Wednesday 10/26/2011 by Lemuria

MUSIC CAN'T LIE

Music can’t lie — it really is the universal language. People can hear your intent. If your intent is to sell records and make money, people will hear that, and it blackens the music. That’s why the live thing has been so exciting, and so spiritual for us. Once the fans are in the room, there’s nothing we can do on-stage that will bring us any more monetary gain. So we’re then free to explore and celebrate the spiritual aspect of the music.

Trey Anastasio, The Detroit News, 10/26/95

Comments

, comment by harryhoot
harryhoot Is this still true today? ( not saying yes or no just wondering what everyone has to say)
, comment by HARRYHOOD213
HARRYHOOD213 True to an extent, however its interesting how they CAN do things on stage that will bring them more monetary gain (more LivePhish sales, CD's, DVD's, etc)...maybe not for that night, but in the future, however they are as pure as a band can be within reality.
, comment by Jackaroe
Jackaroe And two days later they totally shredded the Palace of Auburn Hills. I can remember sitting there during the ultra-spooky duel portion of Scent on that night and thinking, I truly have never had an experience like this before. A few days after that they played Quadrophinia in its entirety. There isn't another band on earth that can touch what they do.
, comment by forbins0218
forbins0218 It is true in the sense that it is on the spot artistic creation that can only be experinced live once.

On the flip side, shows that stand out can be downloaded heavily and sold as DVD's. However, I think the fact that the band donates so much of its merchandise and live phish money to charity keeps it pure!
, comment by PHiSHEAD22
PHiSHEAD22 I agree with that for the most part except for the opening statement. Music is NOT the universal language.
, comment by MrMinersBrother
MrMinersBrother @PHiSHEAD22 said:
I agree with that for the most part except for the opening statement. Music is NOT the universal language.
How is music not a universal language? Maybe not for Deaf people. I took a global music class where I listened to Indian, Chinese and Arabic music. I enjoyed the majority of it and was able to decipher mood and feeling from all of it. Please explain....
, comment by dosemeonturrr
dosemeonturrr @MrMinersBrother said:
@PHiSHEAD22 said:
I agree with that for the most part except for the opening statement. Music is NOT the universal language.
How is music not a universal language? Maybe not for Deaf people. I took a global music class where I listened to Indian, Chinese and Arabic music. I enjoyed the majority of it and was able to decipher mood and feeling from all of it. Please explain....
This is what I was thinking too. But with that said, I could still imagine an argument claiming that, although it is possible to decipher an interpretation of the intent, it's impossible to gain true empathy for the mindset of such a foreign culture and therefore it's impossible to not misinterpret subtleties of the presentation within that context. Phish jokes around and does things all the time that people outside of a suburban American background just wouldn't 'get', and it's often central to their rolling themes.
, comment by PHiSHEAD22
PHiSHEAD22 @MrMinersBrother said:
@PHiSHEAD22 said:
I agree with that for the most part except for the opening statement. Music is NOT the universal language.
How is music not a universal language? Maybe not for Deaf people. I took a global music class where I listened to Indian, Chinese and Arabic music. I enjoyed the majority of it and was able to decipher mood and feeling from all of it. Please explain....
Yes, and being an American, I'm sure you were already somewhat familiar with most, if not all of that music through some medium or another, whether it be in movies, television, or the incorporation of some of the sounds and techniques those cultures value incorporated into music you have heard here. HOWEVER, for people who come from those cultures, Western music can make little to no sense to them. Other cultures may have different tuning systems, not to mention ideas about rhythm, melody, harmony (or the lack thereof) they have grown accustomed to throughout their entire lives, which affects their perception of Western classical and popular music of any kind. For example, a very accomplished Asian musician once attended a symphony orchestra concert for the first time in Europe. When his hosts asked him how he liked the performance and what his favorite part was, he replied something to this affect, "Very well. I enjoyed the first part the most." His hosts, of course, thought he was referring to the first movement of the symphony, but in reality, he was talking about when the musicians were tuning. The rest of the performance, what we would call the "music", to him didn't make much sense and seemed like it all sounded the same. An Armenian musician once also said, speaking of Western classical and pop music, that everything had this "mush" (which we refer to as harmony) that seemed to make everything sound alike and that the regular, driving rhythms made pop music sound undeveloped and boring, not only because of the rhythm but because of the melodies placed on top of that, that were, to him, so confined. Also, as @dosemeonturrr said, without knowledge of American culture, one from another country wouldn't be able to understand a lot of the themes that not only Phish, but many other American bands incorporate into their music, because it's just not familiar to them. Therefore, music cannot be the "universal language". Your world music teacher should've taught you that. Shame on him/her.
, comment by turquOiseMountain
turquOiseMountain Once the fans are in the room, there’s nothing we can do on-stage that will bring us any more monetary gain.

I can't really say what I want to say. . .just enjoy the music. I likes me some good dirty Phish from 94-97.
, comment by patper
patper I think Trey probably meant that music in general is the universal language, not specifically one kind or another. The reason there are so many different sounds throughout the history of music across the world is because it affects each person differently. It does, however, affect everyone in some way.

Show me somebody who doesn't like some form of music.
, comment by PHiSHEAD22
PHiSHEAD22 @patper said:
I think Trey probably meant that music in general is the universal language, not specifically one kind or another. The reason there are so many different sounds throughout the history of music across the world is because it affects each person differently. It does, however, affect everyone in some way.

Show me somebody who doesn't like some form of music.
I can see that. I guess I just read it differently.
, comment by white_lightning
white_lightning While I love the intent of the quote, even back then, there was something they could do onstage to make more money...and that was shred it so people came back the next night. Which Phish did (shredded it) and the fans did (came back).

I would also say that Phish comes closer than almost anyone else to being a "universal language"-like band. Reason being, while their lyrics are a large part of who they are, in plenty of their songs they are so nonsensical as to be irrelevant. And thus, it is the played music that carries more weight (rather than the lyrics), at least to me. And anyone, anywhere, can listen to an epic jam and like it.
, comment by MrMinersBrother
MrMinersBrother Phish aside, Instrumental Music throughout history continues to live on because of its ability to "communicate" with all different types of people. I'm sure your Asian and Armenian musicians appreciate Mozart, Beethoven and Hayden, even though it may be outside of their culture. I do and I'm sure as hell not a part to any of their cultures.
, comment by MrMinersBrother
MrMinersBrother @white_lightning said:
I would also say that Phish comes closer than almost anyone else to being a "universal language"-like band. Reason being, while their lyrics are a large part of who they are, in plenty of their songs they are so nonsensical as to be irrelevant. And thus, it is the played music that carries more weight (rather than the lyrics), at least to me. And anyone, anywhere, can listen to an epic jam and like it.
Good Point
, comment by msgisgoodforyou
msgisgoodforyou ...just think...
if string theory is true,
and we exist in just one verse of many,
maybe life is the chorus,
and music truly is
the universal language...

I know when i play,
it comes from somewhere
deep within me,
and all around me...

, comment by Phart_Door
Phart_Door Actually, mathematics is the true universal language. Yes, everybody loves some form of music, but what you like might be completely foreign to someone else. Nowhere is that more true than with Phish. People sometimes think I'm from another planet for listening to these guys. But math is the same for everybody no matter where you live, what you believe or what other languages you speak.
, comment by DrEvil
DrEvil This is no lie/ this band is pathetic!!
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