, attached to 1995-06-15

Review by GrantBrown

GrantBrown Even at a rating 4.38 (at time of this writing), this show is still one of the most underrated shows in Phish's career. The show is smokin' hot from the jump and there's not a dull second anywhere. The playing is so ferocious that you can hear the PA growl on serveral occasions, and it's obvious that every square inch of The Lakewood is filled to the max with rich sound. Add to all of this that the jams are so intricate & downright weird - forget LSD, more like PTSD! This has 97-Foreshadowing written all over it. Warning - back to back listens are not recommended for cardiac health. Str8Fyah.
, attached to 1986-10-12

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw The debuts give this show some historical significance. You can see Trey stepping up to fill the space left behind by Jeff and thriving. Trey's guitar intro on Slave is excellent and beautiful. The highlight of the whole show to me is likely Sally which is pretty well played. Overall a decent show with some positive signs of a new direction.
, attached to 1986-04-25

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This show is pretty straightforward and inline with most of the shows from this era. One big exception is that the YEM from this show is far stronger than any other before it. The song had grown a lot in just a few weeks and it's pretty fun to listen to on this recording. The only other interesting aspect of this show is it's really the last widely circulated show with Jeff Holdsworth still in the band. So it is fun to romanticize him playing Possum and Camel Walk for the last time as an official member. Besides that a pretty forgetful show. But check out the YEM if you want a great early glimpse into the song that would become the most iconic in the bands catalog.
, attached to 1986-04-01

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw There seems to be some nice progress in the couple months between this show and the circulating February show at hunts. Quinn is decent enough but the pure gold from this show is "Have Mercy" the middle section has some great Piano and Guitar interplay that is beautiful for any era, and something I will probably go back to which is saying a lot from this period. Hood is interesting because the middle section is quite different than what it will grow to be. Instead it includes teases from Col. Forbin and some other nice elements before concluding. The Pendulum is an interesting piece based on the fact that Phish has never known to be particularly politically charged (Jeff was probably the sole member who was) so it's cool to hear them do something like this. For cross over fans from the Dead community it is cool to hear the Help -> Slip suite with Bag at the end as opposed to Franklins Tower. The majority of the show is fairly lackluster and average for this year. Overall nothing to write home about besides the superb have mercy. But that's enough for a 3 star rating from me.
, attached to 1994-04-30

Review by westbrook

westbrook The first set is quite short and unspectacular aside from yet another '94 Stash you'll want to hear. The second set is a big improvement over the first and circulates in SBD quality so there's no reason not to give it a go. Wilson > Bowie is a great combo to get things moving and also begins the "Lion Sleeps Tonight" theme of the set. I found Page to be the instigator of many interesting ideas in this Bowie jam but Trey also gets his licks in before the end. Wolfman's starts another mini segment of the set that runs through Hood. It's still a little strange to hear an early Wolfman's with its lower key and lack of a jam but it's a nice rendition. Peaches is mostly clean aside from a brief slip-up from Trey. The Lion Sleeps Tonight is integrated smoothly into this strong Hood. The ending of the song is cut off but you get the whole jam. It's at this point in the show where you might be expecting a breather, but it keeps rolling all the way through Axilla II, McGrupp, and a really hot Possum that fits in a bunch of teases. Possum concludes the real meat of the show from a jamming standpoint but Purple Rain sung by Fishman is charming in its own way. During BBFCFM Fish has to tell somebody to "get off my fucking riser" which he then apologizes for saying in front of his mother. Funny stuff to end a good show.
, attached to 1986-02-03

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This show is pretty rough. It does have the historical significance with it being the first YEM ever played live (supposedly) but everything around it is fairly rough and very loose. No real highlights from this show at all but it is still an interesting piece of history considering the most iconic Phish song was (supposedly) played for the first time.
, attached to 1985-11-23

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw It's hard to properly rate this show based on how incomplete it is. But what is easy to know is that the Whipping Post jam here is one of the most important jams in Phishtory. It's one of (if not the longest) from the primitive years of Phish. Although it does not have the progression or direction from the post '93 years it is no doubt fluid the whole time. It is essentially the band piecing together various styles and a ton of different teases. The above shows all of the obvious teases like The Other One and Norwegian Wood. What isn't included (yet) is the Slave to the Traffic Light tease at 19:24 of the recording. The whole thing is fantastic and a huge stepping stone for the guys in terms of improvisation live. Mike's is a fairly rough and early version as is Run Like an Antelope. Dave's Energy Guide is obnoxious as usual. Overall what was recorded and recovered is pretty entertaining and good. The only thing worth going back for however is the Whipping Post Jam.
, attached to 2016-06-26

Review by serpent_deflector

serpent_deflector My first show and, therefore, it holds a special place in my heart. I played it over and over, throughout the year, on days there weren’t new shows to listen to. Listening back now, I can see that it is a fairly average show, considering some of the monsters I saw in 2017. But the MFMF opener was well-played and KDF is always welcome. A fun, energetic way to start the show, after having to wait it out for the rain delay. Theme>First Tube was a great way to end a high-energy first set, with Lawn Boy as the lone breather. I see some criticism for the PYITE set 2 opener and I can understand it. It’s not a jam vehicle like we tend to see in that slot and there were some mistakes. But the song’s intro has been a favorite of mine since early in my fandom, after watching Bittersweet Motel. So it got my blood pumping again. Check out Trey’s solo here- it worked for me at least. Light>Golden Age>Boogie On is the meat of the show. Light has awesome melodic soloing from Trey, bombs from Mike and a great groove from Page on the Clav to end it and segue into GA. Golden Age and Boogie On were soaring and funky, respectively. The show ends on another high-energy note with the Possum closer and RnR encore. 3.5/5 stars
, attached to 2012-08-18

Review by theothr1

theothr1 just listened to the sublime "Simple" from this show for the umpteenth time (twice, today) and, for the life of me, canNOT figure out how no one has acknowledged the sick little "Wheel" (more) tease (than jam) that Mike and Fish throw in at about the 8:41 mark (on the LP cd)...it lasts for a little bit until Trey and Page dissolve it into the aforementioned 'whale-call' space
, attached to 1991-11-14

Review by theghost

theghost I'd say this ANTELOPE is being underestimated as a novelty. It really smokes.... Trey shreds it HARD in a 91 style that makes it a little unique from the later ragers. As a small historical note, Smells like Teen Spirit was just starting to explode on this particularly date. Checking back, it was #3 this week on the Billboard Alternative charts and would hit #1 on Nov. 23. It didn't peak on the mainstream charts until mid January. So anyway...the little teen spirit tease was very topical... not just a throw off of an ubiquitous vocal riff.
, attached to 2000-06-24

Review by westbrook

westbrook Good first set, albeit short. Moma and Jim both stretch out in their Type I jams. This Tweezer would be a treat anywhere but it being in the first set makes it even more noteworthy. You can draw some parallels between the Radio City Ghost and this jam, with both featuring thick grooves led by some fabulous playing from Mike while Trey hangs back, giving the jam a very chilled vibe and a deliberate pace. Despite sharing these characteristics, this Tweezer does not develop into anything as transcendent as the movement that begins around minute 16 of the Radio City Ghost. In fact it takes several attempts for the band to successfully build off of the central groove, but if you enjoy the journey you'll appreciate this jam very much. The second set suffers from both a lack of jamming and questionable setlist choices. BOAF starts the set off on the right foot but following that up with Bug immediately disrupts the flow. There's a reason the ballad type songs usually come later in the set. My Sweet One is botched but at least it leads to some stage banter. Antelope is a step in the right direction with Trey using his pedals to create some cool swells in the jam, but then we're right back down with Frankie Says, which is a good song but doesn't do the set any favors in this spot. Carini, Squirming Coil, Caspian continues the up and down feel of the set and doesn't allow for any momentum to build. A quadruple encore is nothing to sneeze at and it makes up a bit for the lackluster second set. 3/5
, attached to 1997-11-28

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Personally to me the 1st set is far superior to the 2nd in this show. The Curtain is a completely out of left field type opener. The YEM that follows is superb and includes a very clever vocal segue into I Didn't Know which is finally polished. Maze is always welcome and this one is complete and total fire. Farmhouse is still very young in this show but Trey plays it completely inspired I really like this version. It also has one of the better Black Eyed Katy's, Trey chops his guitar with nice funky licks. And as expected Theme is fantastic like every other version from '97. The 2nd set is pretty meaty Timber and Limb by Limb have a nice little stretch to it but I feel like they don't go anywhere interesting really. Slave is pretty decent but not a top version from this year. Ghost is the highlight of the set it has some nice experimentation but is completely outshine by the majority of the version from this year. Encore is straight forward. Overall not a standout from this tour, but still worth checking out for the 1st set.
, attached to 1995-11-15

Review by westbrook

westbrook Currently holding a rating of 3.571, I'd call this an underrated show. The first set is not a standout but you still get an AC/DC Bag and SOAM played with their characteristic '95 style fury and a delightful Squirming Coil closer. The Mike's Groove that anchors the second isn't as well known as the 12/1, 12/7, and 12/31 versions, but it's right up there with them in terms of quality. A true highlight of the tour. The material surrounding that show-stopping sequence is merely average by '95 standards but still makes for a really good second set.
, attached to 1992-05-14

Review by Miguelito

Miguelito This was my second show. The energy inside the Capitol Theater was intense and it was clear that this band was quickly outgrowing even larger theaters such as this one. This was a really great show and helped solidify my love for the band. They open with Suzy followed by ATR. Both are fine versions. The same goes for The Sloth and Sparkle that follow. Not much more needs to be said about any of these opening tunes. Things finally open up a bit with Maze. Still in its infancy, this tune has a nice jam but doesn't hold a candle to later versions. I like to ponder the evolution of Phish songs and find it noteworthy that this was the longest version of Maze up to that point since it debuted several months back, only to be bested two shows later. After Horn, with its little false start, we get an excellent Reba. Trey's fine guitar work is on full display towards the end of the jam. The set closes with what I like to call Spiderlope. Those familiar with the Spiderman cartoon from back in the day will be familiar the tease in this version. This tease, combined with secret language instructions, and a fiery jam leading into them, makes for one of my favorite early versions of the tune. Glide, Cavern and Rift are all perfunctory takes but make for an interesting 1-2-3 opening combo for set II. This brings us to Fluffhead. I love this tune and the band gives us a solid version. Eliza is a nice rarity that makes its final appearance this night. And then this brings us to Mike's, which is fiery and rocks. I was always a sucker for the classic Mike's Groove combo so Hydrogen is a welcome inclusion here, and the Wait in the middle of Weekapaug but is an interesting inclusion and is nice for my personal stats. It's also noteworthy that this tune too makes its final appearance on this date. In all, this Mike's Groove is a worthy listen. McGrupp is a lovely visit to Gamehenge. A late set Stash is a really nice treat here, as is the Possum to close it out. It doesn't come close to the amazing version I caught three nights later at Union College but it's still a great version. With Sleeping Monkey and Rocky Top as a double encore, we're done. After this and my next show on 5.17.92, I was sold. This band became my favorite band and I've never looked back.
, attached to 1999-12-08

Review by westbrook

westbrook This is a very good show, and I say that as someone who's not the biggest fan of December '99. The setlist is nicely balanced between rockers, jams, and slower numbers and the jams that are present are all worth your time, something that I don't think can be said for others in this tour. 4/5 for sure.
, attached to 1995-06-23

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Prince Caspian sure was short in these days, wasn't it? Great setlist, as was typical of the time: all killer, no filler. Simple to open the show is interesting... Reba is really good, but my favorite version (12/31/95) hasn't been surpassed so far, in my listening. The You Enjoy Myself vocal jam was a little bit annoying to me during the part where they were kind of making popping noises with their mouths. Run Like an Antelope in the second set is what I'd call a heady version, leading into a segment featuring John Popper on harmonica (Harpua -> Jam -> Llama, Good Times Bad Times.) I think this is the first unfinished Harpua I've ever heard. John really rips on harp through that sequence of tunes. A Day in the Life settles us in for the night.
, attached to 1995-06-22

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show contains the best Sample in a Jar I've yet heard. I was forcibly impressed by how the Sample openers nowadays go in a different sort of direction entirely. It's still the same song, but... I'm musing here on the magnificence of Phish's ability to infuse such life into their music. I noticed that the crowd is quiet on the audience recording during the beginning of Scent of a Mule, which features a stunning "Duel." The other highlights of the first set for me were It's Ice and Maze (and I'm always ready for a Strange Design.) Set II contains what's become known as the FLeezer ("[b]F[/b]inger [b]L[/b]akes Tw[b]eezer[/b]") as well as a jam out of Theme From the Bottom, which is played admirably. This Tweezer is almost an hour long, or as near as makes no difference, and I can easily imagine that the crowd might've been swept away by it. I don't want to spoil it for you. Acoustic Army has some audience participation, I guess? And While My Guitar Gently Weeps closes the show on what I have to assume is an imploring note: part invitation to continue on the tour, and part meanderminded personal externalization. The practice regimen seems to have been a bit stricter at this point? Or maybe they were just honed from playing shows more often. Whatever "It" is about this show, I'd welcome it any time I might see Phish.
, attached to 1995-11-12

Review by Miguelito

Miguelito I've been diving into some less covered shows and this is one that deserves a bit more attention. I love My Friend My Friend in the opening slot, and Llama to follow is sweet. A nice, high energy 1-2 punch to get things going. Guelah is an always welcome rarity and this version doesn't disappoint. The Reba is a magnificent centerpiece of the set. This tune will always have a special place in my heart ever since my love-at-first-listen when I popped Lawn Boy into the CD player back in 1991 and this version is as fine a take as any from this year. The recording is crystal clear here and the band is clearly in sync as they build to an intense peak. A very fine version. The Taste is an early version, which still has Fish on some of the vocals. I don't miss these versions. The If I Could is a lovely breather before the Melt. This version is typical '95 stuff, which is to say it's pretty great. It builds to a chaotic peak and, while it's not the most out there or long version, it's an energetic, strong version. After the audience chess move, the set opens with The Curtain. While I prefer my Curtain's to be With, I'll take it without if there's going to be a monster Tweezer like this that follows. Of course, back in '95 the band was only playing the tune without so we didn't have a choice and this is a nice set opener. This Tweezer doesn't disappoint. While not as deep or exploratory as some of the versions from the past summer, this version is excellent. This upbeat version pretty much rocks the whole time and is worthy of a listen, especially if you tend to lose interest in the spacier or more ambient jams. After a couple of other tunes, Slave makes its appearance and this is a lovely version with nice peaks and valleys. Kudos to the taper as each band member is clear here, and Mike in particular is fun to follow. The Possum is a fun, tease-filled version which sets us up to end the show. While not quite the tease-fest from the second time I caught this song, on 5.17.92, this is a great version. Going into this song, I would have thought this was the set ending. If the band did in fact end here I don't think anyone would have been disappointed. However, the band had other ideas. I love Tweezeprise in the set closing slot rather than as an encore as it closes on the highest possible note. For the encore we get Fire, a nice, short version but it's a perfect choice. After a rocking Tweezer, Possum and Tweezeprise, we should've expected nothing but a Hendrix cover. And we're done. An overall very good show in an excellent tour.
, attached to 1998-07-03

Review by westbrook

westbrook This being a one-set festival performance, there are predictably no big jams to be heard, but a high quality AUD and some fine playing make it a decent listen. 2001 > DwD is the highlight to me, with the former being as laid-back and funky as you'd expect given the date and the latter a sizzling, Type I, complete version. This show also gives you the opportunity to listen to a YEM without feeling the guilt of skipping the vocal jam, although there is no real peak before sliding into A Day in the Life. Compared to most full two-set shows, this doesn't offer anything you haven't heard before, but compared to anything else you could be listening to, I think it stands up quite well.
, attached to 1995-06-22

Review by Midcoaster

Midcoaster The Grateful Dead over on the Hudson, playing Albany during Jerry's final run through the northeast while Phish plays 200 miles to the west on the Finger Lakes. The Dead made a passable final appearance in the region, while Phish absolutely shreds the fabric apart. What more could someone ask for? How would one have known where to go? Such dilemmas represent an embarrassment of riches. We'll never see the likes of it again. BTW, has anyone else ever played a two song second set? This, alone, is an accomplishment of mind f**k, and I applaud Phish their efforts. This is a psychedelic melt-down fest, and I would never complain about it. Thanks, guys.
, attached to 2003-12-02

Review by Mcrothers

Mcrothers I completely disagree with Bob_loblow. In no way would I consider this show to be shit. Agreed, the first set was disjointed but Piper was sick ass hell! R&R was ridicules. End of 2003 into summer 04 wasn't the strongest by any means. But They has some insane dance-able jam syles in this 03 & 04 that I haven't seen anywhere in 3.0.
, attached to 1998-11-28

Review by westbrook

westbrook This show understandably gets lost in the shuffle between two strong performances and has no real marquee jams to speak of. With that said, there are quality versions of Gumbo, Foam, Timber, and Mule to be heard, as noted on the jam charts. When comparing this show to others from the tour, it just doesn't bring enough to sit in the upper tier, but it is well-played and has a decent setlist (the first set is nearly perfect to me). If any of Tube, Disease, or Tweezer had gone bigger, this show would really have no faults, so when you're reaching for some Worcester '98, don't forget this entirely enjoyable, if not exceptional show.
, attached to 2003-07-18

Review by westbrook

westbrook The first set is kind of a wash besides Roggae but it's nice to hear Discern. Gin is not bad but it does not compare favorably to others from the period. Down with Disease anchors the show with a ferocious jam segment that is at times unfocused but any time a jam -> to Catapult is fine by me. Following that up with Bug, Secret Smile, and Two Versions of Me seems redundant, but they're played well. Twist has a dark, effects-driven jam and the Type II stuff in Hood is really on point. This is not one of the stronger shows of the tour but Roggae, DwD-> Catapult, and Hood are swell.
, attached to 2000-06-28

Review by westbrook

westbrook I rate this as one of the better shows of the tour, mostly on the strength of the first set. Although it lacks much Type II jamming to speak of, the energy of the performance really comes through and many of the songs are played with an intensity not often matched. Trey in particular seems to be charged up for the hometown fans. In the first set, he seems determined to get everything he can out of the Type I jams and plays with a lot of fire, leading to some exceptional peaks. Bathtub Gin is the clearest example of this with the band firing on all cylinders and delivering one of the top Gin jams of all-time, but Chalk Dust, Taste, Piper, and If I Could are all played with some extra verve as well. Matching the vibe of the show, this Piper is not an extended groover, but rather a relatively short Type 1 shred-piece. If I could soars magnificently and is available on Magnaball's first From the Archive show. The second set does not reach the heights of the first, but the Down with Disease and Mike's are good listens. The set-opening DwD doesn't stray off the beaten path, but it does feature some quality space that maintains the jam's momentum and leads into the closing riff quite well. Hood in the two-hole is an unusual choice (it was placed in the same spot at the last PNC show 7/10/13) and the jam never really takes off from a slow start during which Trey is tossing glowsticks to the crowd. This Jibboo does not have much replay value; it's nothing special. When the Circus Comes is one my favorite breather type songs, but it would have been more welcome after something a bit more rewarding. Next comes a Mike's Song with a dark, grooving jam segment well worth hearing, but it too never really amps up. Albuquerque is tremendous song in its own right, but I think this set could have used something a bit more upbeat at this point. Weekapaug, First Tube, and Loving Cup end the show in expectedly rousing fashion.
, attached to 1997-11-16

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw The first set from this show is the polar opposite of the following nights. NICU is a great starting point. But along the way you get a weaker than most version of BEK the brand new and understandably sloppy Farmhouse. Billy Breathes is likely the best thing from this set and is fantastic throughout this tour. The Banjo section is pretty forgettable especially the rough transition back to the end of ScentOAM. The second set is decent and Timber gets a random jam out of it. However besides that and a very patient and well played Harry Hood, this set thrives on segues. And the segue into Simple (which the guys had down already for years) and Wilson (not so common and definitely not so easy) are fantastic. Izabella is a nice touch at the end. Bowie is always a welcome encore and is pretty well played. But it's nothing special and nothing new, but it beats another Loving Cup encore! Overall I'd say this show is one of the more "Average" of the tour which I guess you can consider a mild insult considering most of this tour is 4 star or more worthy.
, attached to 1994-10-27

Review by Miguelito

Miguelito Here's another show in my attempt to review underrated and/or under-appreciated shows. Unfortunately I didn't succeed in finding such a show here. We start off with Wilson. I love this tune as an opener and it's too bad it's not used in this placement more often. The "Wilson" crowd chant is now written in permanent marker but this version predates those times and hearing it here without it is a bit strange. It's also the first of several welcome visits to Gamehenge during this show, which are becoming more and more rare these days. Maze is its typical awesome self although this version isn't anything particularly noteworthy. I'll never argue with a visit to Gamehenge, especially when it comes in the form of the Forbin's > Mockingbird combo. This version doesn't disappoint, and includes a Vibration of Life incorporated into the narration, which is a nice twist. Leading into another Gamehenge tune, this Divided Sky that follows is solid and well-played. It and the preceding combo are arguably the highlights of the set. Julius and Ya Mar are both solid to open the second set. Ya Mar in particular has some fine playing by Trey. What should be the centerpiece of the set, Tweezer, follows. A relatively short version, I like its intensity but it doesn't really go too deep. It's such a shame too given what was brewing for this tune a little later on during this tour. The rest of the set is fine, and unremarkable. DWD was still evolving so the short version was typical for the times. Apparently due to some mixup with the venue, the second set was cut off early but the encore was extended. Thus, we get a lovely Slave, the rare and always welcome Icculus, and a Tweezeprise that goes a bit longer than typical. This is an average show in the middle of a mostly phenomenal tour. There's really nothing outstanding but it's a solid, well-played, and enjoyable show.
, attached to 1997-11-14

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw After a fantastic ice breaker of a tour opener the guys reveal the recipe they will use frequently for the rest of the show. A slightly shortened show with a short yet laser focused 2nd set. The entire first set is excellent Gumbo is always a treat and Maze has a great peak and a nice stretch to it. 2001 is also notably good. Antelope has some nice whistling that makes it unique and a great finish. The 2nd set is the design you know and love from this entire tour (and 11/17/97 has it as a 1st set). Wolfman is a nice warmup for the big ones to come. The segue into piper is fantastic, especially considering how difficult it is to seamlessly segue into an awkward intro like piper has. Twist which is new like Piper gets a nice stretch to it and a very experimental one at that. After all this you get an epic Slave to end the set, it has a great stretch and a patient and beautiful peak. just excellently played. Bold as Love is very well played as an encore, not much more you can say!
, attached to 1995-12-12

Review by Miguelito

Miguelito I chose to review this show after noting one lone review while many of the surrounding shows have so many accolades. This seemed odd so I decided to see why, especially since the show offers an intriguing setlist with what looks to be a monster DWD. I had caught 12.9.95 and its monstrous YEM so this DWD held promise. Ya Mar is such a great opener. It's a feel-good, positive, party tune. It sets the mood and now I'm wishing they'd open with it more frequently. This version doesn't disappoint. Sample is fine, and Divided Sky is its typical, awesome self. We're off to a fantastic start! Lifeboy - I used to groan at this one but now I like it. I enjoyed this version and wish they'd bring it back more often. A nice breather before the high energetics of PYITE, a song I like in the opening slot but I welcome anywhere, anytime. I love this tune and here we get a well-executed version. After Horse > Silent, we get a fiery 'Lope that I just love. I'm sure many in the crowd thought this was the set closer. How could they not after a ridiculous version like this, which just builds and builds like the best of them? And how many times have I fallen for this trick by this band? So this moves the tune into a fairly rare mid-set position, which is a nice treat. They close out the set with lovely versions of I'm Blue, I'm Lonesome and Coil. And this brings us to Free to open set II. I love these early versions. Just a bit exploratory while staying within the confines of the tune. I also love the contrast here between the quietness during the vocals and how they crank it up between the lyrics and during the jam. I wish they would take this one further these days. Even at 12.30.15 everyone seemed to take note when the band took the tune out for a slightly longer than usual spin. Sparkle was a breather before the clear centerpiece of the show. This DWD is ridiculous and is such a prototypical example of how Phish was connecting as a band that Fall and how in tune they were with each other. Despite the length it didn't seem like there were any moments where they lost their way. The tune builds to a pretty intense peak, containing elements that are Llama-esque, before dissolving into a really nice ambient jam near the end. Overall this is a pretty awesome version. Lizards, Simple, Jim to close out the set. Phew. All three are fine but pale in comparison to DWD. The Jim in the closing spot is a nice treat and, while well-played, isn't anything extraordinary. Fire closes it out in energetic fashion. With Lope, DWD and Jim all in atypical slots, I like that the band mixed up the setlist here. It worked and this show resulted in some major highlights.
, attached to 1987-09-21

Review by BudokanCostume

BudokanCostume Love this show. I'm attempting the fun-daunting task of attempting to listen to all the recorded shows. Will I make it? I don't know, but this show from a Monday night in late September 1987 makes it worth the digging. I'm trying to get my thoughts and notes down before reading the other reviews, but before I clicked the button I saw @DollarBill's first line about this show is a good example of how their roots still come through today. I agree as I noticed for the first time some hallmarks and traits that I can't get enough of still when they still bring them out. Coming off a "far out" recording effort from the 1987.09.02 show, the crispy sound and performance of Clod immediately jump out. I love how loose and funky AC/DC is, and it sounds like Trey is stepping away from the full-throated “baaaahhhhhgg” approach to the refrain, even if the recording abruptly cuts off. Some quintessential YEM Acapella Madness, fun boogieing interludes in The Curtain With, a completely raging and manic, BBFCFM!, and an extra Dubby Makisupa. Yes, yes, and yes. I love getting to hear these early shows for picking up tracks like Flat Fee, and phish.net for giving me the rundown on its history. Everything about this show is popping off, the crowd, the band, the recording… definitely the best show of ‘87 I’ve listened to so far, and a Monday none-the-less. I do know what that Terrapin was, but since my first time seeing them, I’ve always been blown away by their fearlessness to do anything. It’s a bummer that Fluffhead gets cut up and chopped off, but I’m sure it was sweet, floating, and joyful as it’s ever been, and something only those who were there will get to hold on to.
, attached to 1997-11-13

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw You know typically every single tour opener can be added up to something as simple as a "Warm up show". This label need not apply to this show, it is for the lack of a less cliché term "Fire". Right from the get-go CDT gets things moving to lightspeed quick. BEK is in it's most infant form but does it's thing. Theme is fantastic like literally every other version from '97, very inspired. Melt is fairly average but good. You'd think the set may be done after my soul....Or maybe they'd stick Cavern or Character Zero after it for good measure. But they unveil YEM in the first set of the first show! And boy it's pretty tasty! And after all that you still get Character Zero to light one last fire for the set. Stash kicks of the 2nd set somewhat in the same vein as the Amsterdam version. However this one goes in a different direction but is still very solid. Mike's song is just top notch excellent as is the absolute incendiary version of Weekapaug to end the set. Standard encore but the room is already destroyed so who cares? Probably the best tour opener I've ever heard.
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