, attached to 2017-07-28

Review by nesta

nesta Duders, the boys were having fun that night. Page messing up during Thing People Do, Trey giggling during Chocolate Rain, CDT and practically every other song. I was watching this show the other day with my wife, and kids (9 and 6yr olds) and after ChocolateRain, my wife asked what the hell that was and my 9 yr old boy chimed in... "its a song about diarrhea, mommy." Then Ass handed came on and the kids peeped their pants laughing sooo hard. This show was good clean FUN. My wife commented on Mike singing "You SexyThing", at least he is having fun she said. Yeah, and so are the 20,000+ other phriends. Thank You Boys. that was a fun night in NYC.
, attached to 1993-02-18

Review by PHATTSKIS

PHATTSKIS Today is 2/18/2018. So, 25 years ago, tonight, I went to my first PHiSH show. I remember it being cold. I remember it being at the Elecrtic Ballroom, which was a sh*t hole dance club underneath the interstate bridge mess known as the Henley Street exit off of I-275 and I-40 (it’s “I-275” in the South, not “The 275” like on the West Coast, where I lived off and on for 20 plus years). Some phriends of mine lived about 6 blocks from there so we walked. Psylly times ensued as we walked there and made our way into the venue. I had spent the past few years on Grateful Dead tour and was interested in seeing a Mini tour, similar to Widespread Panic. He lot was sketchy, not because of the kids, but due to being dimly lit under the interstates so we didn’t spend much time outside. The show started off rocking. I didn’t know any of the tunes but got into the bounce and felt the groove quickly. I had a couple of bootlegs but they didn’t grab me the way being in the show did. A few songs in I heard Tweezer, whIch went into Foam. Foam has been since that night my favorite song. Coulda been the psyilliness involved, the strange vibe in the club or the cool art work I heard Mike and his mom made for the backdrop. Whatever it was it was cool. The second set was more rocking than the first until the soundboard shorted out. The band asked us to be quiet and started singing a capella, which I already knew they did but was Very Cool. They ended with Rocky Top, the Tennessee Anthem, and the crowd was satisfied even with the shortened show. I wasn’t hooked that night quite yet. It would be a couple of months later floating in my pool listening to The Wedge that I would actually get it but I did. 122 shows later, I have slowed down from 18-19 shows a year but still dig this band.
, attached to 2018-02-17

Review by jsauce

jsauce This show sold out in a heartbeat and I'd long ago given up hope of finding a ticket when, a few days before the show, a friend called and offered me a pair. I'm so glad he did. What a wonderful night of music. The songs were divided into I'd say three categories: 1. Straight-ahead readings of familiar songs (Mexican cousin, buffalo bill, etc) 2. Songs that required almost wholesale reworking to fit the solo acoustic format (lifeboy, limb by limb) 3. Songs that incorporated layers of repeated riffs and other effects (twist, stealing time). I really enjoyed the improv and wished maybe there was a little bit more of that. The crowd was respectfully quiet and Trey went out of his way to never really out the music in full throttle. Find this show if for no other reason than to listen to Trey's story about cincy 2003. It confirms what we all suspected (i.e. That they were doing tons of blow and keeping bad hours.) Very lucky to have attended. All anyone could talk about after was how great it was.
, attached to 1990-10-25

Review by SplitOpenAndMule

SplitOpenAndMule In a February 3rd 1997 Rockline radio interview, Trey and Fish tell a weird story about this show: You can hear it at 11:30 of the interview [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ahLCr8nlbI#t=11m22s]here[/url]. Trey: We did a show in Houston and a guy got shot, you remember that? It was in that little, we played in this um... out in the parking lot he got shot, it wasn't in the crowd. Fish: Oooh yeah, I remember that. Trey: I was gonna walk my dog and the guy was saying- Fish: Yeah, that was that gig we were yelling at each other. Trey: Yeah, we got in a fight on stage. The whole thing was really bizarre. Fish: Uh, weird night. [Laughter] Trey: It was something about the vibe there, but he was saying, "Don't walk your dog out there cause it's a really dangerous neighborhood," and I was, "Oh, okay," you know. I had Marley, my dog, used to tour with us, and there was only about four people in the audience in this little club we were playing at. And we ended up getting into this huge fight, like right on stage, I can't remember what it was about, but just stopped playing, dropped the instruments, screaming at each other. DJ: You guys were screaming at each other on stage? Trey: On stage, yeah- Fish: No like, yeah, just, yeah, just, you know, arguing about- Trey: You know, the groove was rushing or something, Fish: Some, yeah, it's like, Antelope, like, oh, yeah, it was some thing, like, speeding up... Trey: And we just stopped and started fighting, and then I went off stage and there was this commotion, and I walked outside and some guy had gotten shot out there. So that was pretty weird.
, attached to 2004-06-17

Review by NiceGuyMike

NiceGuyMike Overall a very solid show that is definitely worth your time. This Moma Dance may be my all time second favorite version. SPAC '16 will always be my fave (attendance bias). A very nice segue takes us from that Moma into a stellar Free. IMO the momentum is lost during Maze due to a jam section that is surprisingly boring and without direction. Frankenstein gets things back on track before the set break. There is plenty to enjoy in set two. 46 Days > Possum is a solid way to begin a set and Suzy has a fantastic jam. I'm not as big a fan of this 2001 as many others seem to be. The Mike's Groove is much more to my liking with some killer work from Gordo. Definitely give this show a spin or check out, as I did, The Live in Brooklyn DVD.
, attached to 1992-08-29

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This is a pretty high energy set and a great set at that. Chalkdust lights up the audience right away, may be standard length but it is pure fire from beginning to end. Rift is in it's an infancy here and is still trying to figure itself out, so it can be forgiven for being average at best. Maze continues the trend of destruction as it goes through a beautiful series of tension and release, pretty spot on version. YEM is also pretty damn solid, must have been a lot of fun for those in attendance to see a very well executed Santana tease performed inside of it. Overall an above average opening set with a lot of energy. And why not? On the hollowed grounds of such a significant and famous venue such as Shoreline you have to bring it, and they did.
, attached to 1990-12-31

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Probably the worst NYE show Phish will ever play. This show has a bizarre vibe to it. It feels unorganized, and the guys are playing like they are very nervous. Perfectly understandable considering that NYE is a big show and let's face it, they're not a big band yet. However I literally cannot find anything that's noteworthy about this show. A lot of the songs that they know like the back of their hands at this point are stale and bring nothing new or interesting to the table. Even opening the new year with Buried Alive is a questionable choice. However the way we need to look at it is this is a band that takes mistakes and shortcomings to heart. These are the shows that the band looks back at and works hard to correct in the future. Never again after this will there be an NYE show that doesn't have memorable or noteworthy aspects to it. Shows from these years are stepping stones based on their success as well as their mistakes.
, attached to 2018-02-09

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show showed off Trey's 12-Step synth switch a lot more than the opener of this year's acoustic tour. I thought the Wilson story about the Helping Friendly Playbook was really funny, but some of the other stories weren't quite on par with Peyton Hooten. Apart from the most appealing numbers to me--The Inlaw Josie Wales, Dog Faced Boy, Sleep, and Summer of '89--this show actually seemed to have a "second set..." unusual for a Trey acoustic show. Several songs ran over 9 minutes in length, with or without concomitant stories. Light was particularly good at showing off the kind of angel-choir synth effect that Trey's been using with his 12 Step. I feel like he kind of warmed up to the crowd, the venue, or just the show entirely throughout the performance. I certainly hope that Trey will employ the 12 Step with Phish, but without it becoming something that distracts from his imputed role as leader of the band (like the percussion rack or the keyboard.) I think the other members of the band have been clear that they want Trey to lead the band. In that case, this tour is probably very helpful practice for that position which will come into play most notably in July.
, attached to 1994-10-26

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat This Runaway Jim is such a cheeky add-on. Suzy Greenberg finishes comfortably north of the 1-hour mark, but instead of wrapping up the set, as most could have been forgiven for expecting, they dive into Jim. Bravo. The Antelope is awesome. Reba doesn't hit those July 94 heights but is plenty good. There are hints of Simple and Boogie On Reggae Woman from Mike in the latter part of YEM.
, attached to 1994-10-23

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat Guys seem a bit, uh, buzzed for the second set. The Bouncing Around the Room > Halley's Comet segue was flubbed (before ultimately being saved), and Halley's Comet itself was an absolute mess on vocals. The Vibration of Life banter is also, uh, out there. But hey, a long show and massive second set. Nothing to complain about. The Trey section of YEM is absolutely furious. And as mentioned in the show notes, the Hood has a fake climax before dissolving and building back up again into a raging peak.
, attached to 1998-08-12

Review by markah

markah What a show! An astonishing opener followed by delectable rarities, amusing banter, and great covers thickly layered throughout the first set. Not noted in the setlist, they play a "song" in-between Character Zero and Ramble On, or Trey announces it as a "song written by Fishman..." Fishman doesn't get the joke. The closing suite of Ramble On->Slave is among the most well-executed pieces of ephishemera. The Mike's sounds like an airliner careening with is wings aching and groaning under the weight, and the next 30 minutes of Simple->Rift continues the magical flight through this fantastic dreamscape. End the encore...well, that's the part you love, right? And for good reason! Shout out to everyone who totally called the Talking Heads' cover, too. Special shout out to @shapsio for giving this one the official treatment. Listening to this show now, 20 years later, it's like getting a fresh set of ears. And they are directly plugged into Mike's rig. Man, these sound fantastic. After the show I remember still laughing at the Makisupa keyword, the "who's your daddy vocal jam," loving the jam out of Ramble On and how it reminded me of Dayton (just in the way it went into Slave), and thinking "Jeez...we have got such a long drive to Maine."
, attached to 1994-10-21

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat This show isn't quite as good, but it reminds me a lot of the 12-1-95 show. Lots of similarities in the set construction: DWD > early in the first set, a huge Mike's Song/Groove early in the second set. I hold 12-1-95 in pretty high regard, and this show ain't that. But still would say that they're clearly of the same ripping era.
, attached to 1998-08-12

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show has a classic, stacked setlist, with Roggae and Character Zero the most recent originals played. I wonder if maybe Phish was trying to reserve some firepower for the ensuing Lemonwheel festival. It's a very bantery show (Trey "rambles on") and features a lot of covers. Not noted by the setlist team I hear a Ramblin' (get it?) Man tease at 7:58 in Simple. Simple also features a very sludgy jam that suggests both Spooky and Whole Lotta Love. The energy here is kind of spaced-out, though the Mike's Song is certainly jammed extensively and the Weekapaug features some of the "clattering Rube-Goldberg funk" mentioned by @waxbanks in a review of an entirely different show. The Ramble On cover is fun, with a miniature jam in between it and Slave to the Traffic Light, and Burning Down the House is funny. I like this show, but it's not one I'll probably come back to a lot, even with yesterday's archival release. Kind of how the 8/11/98 Runaway Jim looks better to me on paper while still being a great jam, the Mike's is the marquee jam here but it seems somewhat in and out of focus, perhaps because the concentration here is on the gag and the banter. 8/11/98, however, didn't run its gag into the ground (Bittersweet Motel, halfway between Erie and Pittsburgh) and it also featured quite a lot more lively playing, in my opinion.
, attached to 1988-02-26

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw A very mediocre show even for this era. This show like most from this era has a setlist full of tunes that they are still in the middle of writing and still ironing out the creases. This is clearly shown during Suzy, Phase Dance, and Fluffhead. Not all of it is bad though. In fact one of the best parts of this show is the pretty seamless segue into Possum. So right there you get the feeling that they are getting the hang of some of the more familiar songs in their sets. YEM although not particularly strong is really becoming it's own by this time. This source cuts out after lizards so I can't report for the rest of the show which unfortunately has some heavy hitters for this era in it.
, attached to 1994-10-16

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat This is a maddeningly constructed second set and really entire show. Excellent Fluffhead -- the phish.net description of it being laid back is spot on, I'd just add that Fishman is largely responsible for that -- gives way to BBJ, which is a shame any way you dice. Things get back on track with Antelope, and back off track with a pair of acoustic songs. Sample in a Jar and Highway to Hell do nothing to redeem the setlist. The heavy hitters are sufficiently heavy, but just too much blah interspersed.
, attached to 1989-05-26

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This is a pretty strong show. It really does have a lot to offer, far more than other shows from this era. You have a lot of funny banter as is pretty normal in the early days. But you also have some nice goodies music wise. You have a very long David Bowie from this era, of course with the lyrics changed to “Lazy Lester” you have a pretty damn strong YEM. And Weekapaug is fire as always. And to add to all that one of the strongest front to back sets from this era in Set 3. The only real downsides are the early incarnation of Sanity which is kind of boring sounding. And a very infant Gin. It says this is the very first version. But early in the show you can here people in the audience requesting it so I doubt this is its debut. Overall a pretty stellar show. It gets a very rare 4 Stars for me from this era.
, attached to 2018-02-08

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is an entirely intimate glimpse into Trey's acoustic performances. Even moreso than the 1999 Acoustic/Electric TAB tour, I would say. For one thing, there're a lot more "stories" provided in this show than the acoustic sets from the TAB tour in May 1999. For another thing, there's just a lot more distance timely regarding Trey and Phish's Phishtory compared. One thing I'll say is that the audience is for the most part very respectful of the dynamics between silence and eruption. In moments where it's appropriate, there may be eruptions from the crowd--and even in some moments where it's not appropriate in my opinion--but when silence is called for, it's usually found. Trey seems to encourage audience participation especially in Sleeping Monkey, where he says, "I'll play it, you sing it!" Also during Limb by Limb he trades lyrics with the audience. I am mostly, however, admiring of the dynamic between the audience and the performer here, where Trey is given the space he needs to tell his stories and play his songs, while the audience is primarily attentive and receptive to what's going on. As a final note I'll mention that Til We Meet Again would surely be welcome in any Phish set, and I'm thankful that The Inlaw Josie Wales was revived.
, attached to 1994-05-29

Review by Miguelito

Miguelito I love hunting for underrated gems and my hope was that this show would fit the bill. This being 1994, and following the more famous show from the day before with its top notch Reba and Les Claypool's guest appearance, this show has all the makings of hidden treasure. I'll begin by noting that the recording is a soundboard with a pretty good mix. Opening the show, we get Divided Sky. I love this tune as an opener. It happened a few times in '94 but in general it's not too common. And what a powerful way to open things up as this version delivers. I'm a huge Guelah Papyrus fan, ever since my first listen on A Picture of Nectar, so this was nice to hear. Halley's, DWD, Sparkle, Julius, and I Didn't Know fill in the rest of the middle of the first set solidly, without any of them being remarkable. And this leads to Bowie to close out set I. There are numerous excellent Bowies in '94, and while this one isn't quite on par with the grandest of them (see, e.g., 6.18.94, 11.26.94, 12.29.94), it holds its own. It patiently builds to its peak, exploring several places along the way. Mike is particularly prominent in the mix here. And then we do get the build, and it's fantastic and a prime example of Phish's tension and release jamming style during this time of their career. Nellie Kane as a set II opener is an unusual and unexpected choice that is noteworthy for being the only time it's served in the set II opening slot. Things really get rolling with Melt. As with Bowie, '94 was a peak year for Melt and this version exemplifies this. It's a fairly standard take on the tune, which is to say it's excellent and is pretty nasty, just the way they should be. It includes some screaming and other vocals mixed into the heart of the jam and it's during this tune that having a soundboard to clearly hear what's going on is a bonus. The build up to the end is quite stretched out, with more screams coming in. And then it kind of disintegrates before concluding. It's quite an interesting version, worthy of a listen or two, or ten. The following Esther is lovely, getting a well-deserved noteworthy notation. Chalk Dust comes next. This short version packs a punch. Horn is a treat. As is McGrupp, an always-welcome venture into Gamehenge. The Oh Kee Pah > Suzy combo is nice to hear here, even if the versions are merely solid. It reminds me of when I first started seeing the band and will always be my preferred lead in to Suzy. Suzy ends and drops deftly into Antelope. While this one starts off a bit quietly, it quickly builds in intensity. Once going, this version smokes. Closing out the set is their fun [i]a capella[/i] take on Free Bird. It's always nice to have multiple tunes in the encore. But multiple encores? That's extremely rare. We get Wilson > Golgi > Rocky Top for Encore 1, all played admirably with a little misstep by Trey in the vocals during Golgi. And then we get Encore 2, which starts off with a brief jam while Trey was off stage, followed by Hood and GTBT. The Hood is the highlight of the encores and this is solid version. Overall this is a very solid show, with a few standout tunes but everything is played very well during one of the band's prime eras. This one is definitely worthy of your time.
, attached to 1998-11-11

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I rated this show 4 out of 5 stars. It's kind of under the radar, but it's been commemorated in From the Archives (Halley's Comet) or Live Bait, I can't remember which. Gumbo moves from its standard funk into two segments: what I'm maintaining is a "proto-bliss jam," and then the then-frequent ambient space that appeared so often in 1998. Call Me If You Need a Fool is one of the bluegrass tunes that I would very much like to resurface, particularly in light of this version, wherein Trey miffs the lyrics a few times. I find this show's Tela to be a very good exemplar of that song, so much so that it kind of converted me to phandom of Tela, whereas before I had been somewhat indifferent towards the stalwart Gamehendge tune. Finally from the first set, I feel like the Julius should be Jamcharted. Halley's Comet is the aforementioned archival jam, and it stays mostly "shreddy" throughout, though it modulates (> Simple.) The Limb by Limb melts away at one point into a kind of virtual Page-and-Trey duet, which Page very much leading the ensemble... it's a very pretty version. Finally from the second set, Ghost does indeed (as @n00b100 points out in his review) recall the fabled 7/6/98 version, but it doesn't quite scale the heights that way. It's a bit more subdued and less peaky. Funky Bitch as the show-closing song in the encore features some phun audience clapping. This show is well worthy of archival release, in my opinion, and not just because of the marquee jam in Halley's Comet.
, attached to 2009-08-14

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw A fantastic show from front to back, and easily a top contender for the best of 2009. First set is as good as the second IMO. PYITE is very well played. Col Forbin although a rarity shows no signs of rust what-so-ever. Same with mockingbird which is probably the most complicated thing Trey plays. It's also interesting to note the feeling of despair when Trey doesn't include a narration during Mockingbird, and I believe this is the first time since the original versions that he didn't? Highlight of the set (and possibly the show) for me is the Stash. I find it incredible that it's not mentioned more as it is as solid as they come. It may trade some of it's typical tension and release for more of a thunderous pulsing sound but that's more than ok to me because it all fits perfectly. DWD is always an excellent candidate to open a set and this one is great. The biggest issue I have with it (and my biggest issue of this entire show) is why the hell Trey ripchorded into Wilson. The jam still had life and he impatiently started that riff, I understand really wanting to play something but ease into it a little more. Slave is also outstanding, great peaks that are hardly seen in 3.0. Piper has a nice quick little jam. The Catapult -> Icculus section continues the fun aspect of this show and is unique as hell. YEM is standard but well played all the same. Fairly average encore to these ears. But not a super cliche song choice for it.
, attached to 1989-09-09

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This show has its share of sloppyness (Foam, Gim, and PYITE). But it also has some Strength in Bowie, Parts of YEM, and Hood. Melt is also fairly strong for its infancy and a great taste of what is to come. And it’s also cool to hear the Rhombus Narration as well as a cool little Reba tease to start Bowie. Not a super memorable show. But it teeters just at 3 stars for me.
, attached to 1992-07-25

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is pretty much an average-great show until the Santana band members join in. That is to say, everything is tightly and splendidly played, but the You Enjoy Myself, Llama, Funky Bitch combination is particularly inspired due to the guests. I'm not overly familiar with Santana, so I don't know if Carlos was always this way, but his playing tends to pale in comparison to Trey's in this show. A class act like Carlos Santana was surely cognizant of that, and made way for Trey to show off, but the complexity of Trey's even early style tends to dominate here. Karl Perazzo would appear again on and after Halloween 1996, and those shows are certainly worth listening to. I could really go for another, late-era Karl Perazzo guest spot, actually. Anyway, listen to it.
, attached to 2013-07-26

Review by conormac

conormac Everything in the first set is played with more spunk than standard 3.0 stuff. A little quicker pace/tempo to songs and set as whole. Really helped get the west coast party started off right. This is a fantastic show, my phirst at the Gorge, will never forget it. I was getting pelted by glow sticks so hard during Cross-eyed, and the type I jam was such fire the crowd on the floor was going berserk. Great memories, can't wait for 2018!
, attached to 1992-04-03

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw ::Source I heard only have the second set:: The 2nd set is pretty excellent from this show. The > into The Sloth is seamless. Possum is a top notch version. YEM is played with a fine polish finish. The vocal jam is also pretty solid (although it’s super annoying at the same time). The Mango song is thoughtful and very well played. Llama rips as always. The highlight of it all to me might be this Hood. It’s played so tight, yet in the middle it is beautiful in more of a loose way. It moves to the outro without a hitch. Great set all around, very inspired playing. Would listen again.
, attached to 1995-12-09

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is a good show to listen to if you want to hear Trey "shred" in a way that's somewhat unique to this circumambient era in Phishtory. Maze illustrates some siren-like techniques from him before a Phrygian(?) clinic... Trey is just really on for the entire show. Timber Ho! to open the second set gets very interesting, but everyone remembers this show for the You Enjoy Myself, so much so that it's named The Albany YEM. The silent jam is really funny on video, with Trey playing his guitar behind his head, and so forth. It's quite a testament to the powerhouse force that Phish was in Fall 1995 that they carried this frantic energy all the way through to New Year's Eve. I can think of a number of shows that I like more, but as I said, for people like me, who were drawn into Phish most of all because of Trey's guitar virtuosity, this show is sure to satisfy.
, attached to 1991-02-01

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw The first show of 1991 and it really sets the tone for the rest of the year (and Phish's career). A typical first show of the year. Lots of new material in its infant form, but also some pretty strong takes from their existing catalog (Reba, Bowie). This all mixes together in a stereotypical warm up show. The majority of the first set is strung together with the guys dishing out there new material for the first time in a setlist. This doesn't make for any strong or noteworthy versions of anything. But the Bowie that closes the set is pretty strong (as always). CDT is born to start the first set, and is as straightforward a version as they'll ever play of it. The Reba that follows is superb even for early Phish standards. Mango Song is also pretty strong. And unfortunately just as the momentum slowly grows the guys basically get kicked off stage for curfew. I would guess they had about 20-30mins of material planned for the remainder of the show maybe a little more. It's a shame to think of what could have been played to add to this particular show. I could see a nice Harry Hood or Antelope being tagged at the end of the set. But we will never know! All in all a 3 star show based on historical value as well as some top notch versions of songs.
, attached to 1996-11-02

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show features Karl Perazzo on percussion for the duration. He gets lost in the mix sometimes, but that's not to cast reflection upon his achievements... just to say that Phish's soundstage is busier than Karl might've been used to before. Ya Mar, the show opener, is probably the exemplary definition of Karl's feature, here. Taste is astounding. I'd honestly never understood before what was going on with Fishman during that number. It's remarkable. Free has a kind of noisy outro. The big lauded sequence from this show is the Crosseyed and Painless -> Run Like an Antelope. While it's impressive that Phish could jam Crosseyed out to this degree only 2 nights after its debut at Hallowe'en at the Omni in Atlanta, the jam is kind of staid in the sense that it doesn't really provide that much color. I remember early in my phandom that this sequence was recommended as an all-timer, but I don't think with the benefit of hindsight that it's really that essential. The final most notable thing about this show is Butch Trucks from the Allman Brothers Band sitting in on drums for the Funky Bitch encore. Fishman is relegated to Trey's percussion rack, but it's still a thrilling version.
, attached to 1990-04-25

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Not a show I'd listen to again but it does have some cool elements to it. I like the Led Zeppelin teases throughout by Mike. I also like the good amount of banter that seems to be caused by inclement weather. It's one of those things that would be taken for granted considering the guys would talk less and less as time went on. The one thing about this show that I would consider a "Highlight" would be "If I Only Had A Brain". Yes, as silly as it sounds I really thing that will be the most memorable part of this show to me. It's especially funny hearing Fish singing it through the electrolux. I like how he slips "What are you looking at Paul?" quickly during one of his verses. Overall I'd say it's a fairly rough show. But the repetition of shows like this is what makes Phish a powerhouse in the later years so no real gripes here.
, attached to 1994-10-08

Review by dr32timmymeat

dr32timmymeat This is a molasses-paced 2001. It works, though. This was the second show of the fall tour and they clearly got the kinks in Simple ironed out during their time off. It's all grown up here... none of the goofiness of earlier versions. Nice vocal outro gives way to an aggressive ending to Mike's. Weekapaug and Fluffhead follow in short order, making the middle chunk of this second set and absolute monster.
, attached to 1990-09-13

Review by SplitOpenAndMule

SplitOpenAndMule I was very excited to hear the first known and recorded secret language signals in this Possum, and can only imagine the crowd must have been flabbergasted as the band broke into abrupt changes throughout the jam. (Secret Language has yet to be explained, as far as I'm aware.) Unlike DemandOpener's review, I loved hearing the Bag>Buried Alive>A Train segues, but I can understand the other perspective. Digging into it further, I realized what was going on, and thought it might be helpful to explain it on this setlist page for anyone who likes to understand the tricks behind the magic. The key is the "I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart" signals, a signal I hadn't been aware of before. At the end of Bag, Trey plays the Charlie Chan signal, which indicates a secret language cue is about to happen. He then plays the rising and falling "I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart" riff, which is played to indicate that a new song is on deck and about to be transitioned to. To tell the rest of the band what song it is, Trey plays part of the song, and then band abruptly drops into it. This works uncannily well when, at the end of Bag>Charlie Chan>"I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart" signals, Trey plays the Buried Alive riff, and the band immediately breaks into Buried Alive (I call it reprise, since it's the second of the show, and a shorter version). That's the first known "I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart" signal, and I think it's incredibly cool. During that short Buried Alive, however, things get messy. Trey plays the Charlie Chan signal (think: secret language is coming), followed by the "I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart"signal (think: a new song is coming), followed by the first few notes of The Landlady. At this point, Trey thinks everyone is ready, so at the end of a measure of Buried Alive, he starts The Landlady, but it seems the rest of the band didn't know what song they were going into or how to get there, so things just kind of slow down and space out. Trey, ever quick on his toes, quickly plays another "I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart" signal followed by the 'A' Train riff, before the band all seamlessly kicks into 'A' Train on the 1. I can see how it's cringeworthy, but I think the band plays it off really well, and they all hop aboard the 'A' Train, none the worse for wear. As for the rest of the show, I think it's pretty standard 1990 Phish, which is to say simultaneously incredible and mostly unremarkable in light of the rest of Phish's live canon. In this show, all the debuts are very exciting to hear, especially a zesty Tube and extra energized Paul and Silas. Goin' Down Slow is a great cover I'd love to hear them bring back, and perhaps to mark the specialness of the song and secret language debuts: Sparks is played. It is a special show. For the last three songs of the second set with The Dude of Life on vocals, Phish is a different band. They're more like a, well, Phishy version of a Brit-Punk-Grunge band. After accepting that, I enjoyed Self and Dahlia (especially the outro sort-of vocal jam on the latter), and The Dude's comical drawn out exit during Revolution's Over. 3 stars for playing, 4 stars for history.
You can still access archived Phish.net reviews


Phish.net

Phish.net is a non-commercial project run by Phish fans and for Phish fans under the auspices of the all-volunteer, non-profit Mockingbird Foundation.

This project serves to compile, preserve, and protect encyclopedic information about Phish and their music.

Credits | Terms Of Use | Legal

© 1990-2018  The Mockingbird Foundation, Inc. | Hosted by End Point Corporation