, attached to 2022-04-23

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ After N2 and N3 of this run, I came in expecting continued greatness to wrap up YEMSG Spring 2022. From the first notes of Fluffhead, I knew we were in for it. This was a spectacular way to finish the week, full of crowd favorites from the earlier days and some pleasant nods to the newer catalog. The jams were great, and the energy in the room was off the charts. I had an absolute blast. I actually could not believe Set 1 was performed in 2022. I mean, just reading the setlist, you might think that this was straight out of '99 (if you overlook Egg In a Hole, which I count as a quote/tease and not an individual song). This was one of the most fun sets I've ever personally attended, as the crowd was experiencing communal euphoria from start to finish. Fluff came to New York, Arrival, We've Got Skyscraper, the transition back to Simple proper after a crazy dark jam, the band turning around to face the back of the stage during Divided Sky pause, and ALL of the First Tube closer--these moments are cemented in my brain due to the absolute batshit cheering we produced in that room. Musically, I really love Trey's solo at the end of Fluffhead; some of the lines he pulls out are just so triumphant and celebratory. The Simple jam here may have been my favorite of the entire run (though DwD, Ghost, and SYSF are good contenders), especially from ~14:00 on when things get real dark and doomy. Add to all of the magic the fact that this was my first Fluffhead, first Hydrogen-filled Mike's Groove, AND first Divided Sky? Absolute platinum tier. Set 2 had some work to do to keep the pace. Although I felt it fell just a bit short of the mark, there's still some really awesome material in here, starting with NMINML. By far the longest single-song jam of the run, NMINML explores a few different Type II themes and energies without evolving too drastically in any one direction. Plenty of meat in there to pick at. A compelling Prince Caspian (another first for me!) gives way pretty quickly to Piper, which stood out as a Set 2 highlight for me. Trey shreds over a steady upbeat, darkish groove where Mike really stands out for his creative bass approach. As Phish fans love, Piper transitions right into Gotta Jibboo (ahem 6/19/04). Trey harkens back to the gag of the previous night and and Jibboos of yesteryear with his funk siren in the jam section. Always Wanted it this Way and Lonely Trip take a step back from the heavy hitting for some nice loftiness and a slow breather. Finally the boys bring us home with a beastly Walls of the Cave finish. The energy on the jam here is sky high again, and Trey shreds above and beyond. Though the encore didn't deliver the YEM I'd been looking for all run, we got three more tunes before going home and I can't complain. I was stoked to see my first Wilson since my first show (this time I knew the call and response intro, lol), relish in a sweet David Bowie (my fave Phish tune) with some excellent Mike in the jam, and close the run with a spirited More. Like a beloved little one leaving Grandma's house on Thanksgiving, I went home sleepy, stuffed, and super satisfied. Absolutely killer run.
, attached to 1990-10-25

Review by Lifeboy13

Lifeboy13 I bought the promotional venue poster on eBay in 2008 from what appeared to be the owner/manager of the SHOWBAR. It came with the contract and rider from Phish and has a stage set up diagram with Languadocs phone number as well as having John Paluskas number on the front. No signatures on the paperwork but was an unbelievable find for $35. The poster was creased down the middle and looked to have been used as a folder for the paperwork. I'm not sure if condition is an issue because I've only seen tour blanks and have never seen anything of this calibre to compare it too. What Value does it have? I was thinking of selling if the value is there. Not sure if I can post a picture in the thread either.
, attached to 2000-09-27

Review by mhirstm75

mhirstm75 Don't sleep on this show. The 2nd set alone is worth the admission price. 1st set has some nice work in the Melt, LCL, and Taste with a typicallyy rocmitb Cavern taking us to the set break. I remember being anxious for the 2nd set to bring the heat, as the first set left me needing more. And, the second set does NOT disappoint. Piper>Gumbo>Ghost>Mango is phenomenal Phish that is as good a four-song stretch that I be seen before or since. The Heavy Things made my girlfriend and friends smile. It rocked. Yeah, it's catchy as shit. Sue me. I dig it. The brother bust out is nice. I have seen only one other Brother, back at Sandstone '98. YEM is the quintessential Phish song and it will always be welcome. Loving Cup sends on out merry way on a big rockin note. Second set is where it's at. You need to hear it.
, attached to 2022-04-22

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ This was my first time attending an entire "NYE" run, as well as my first time catching a gag / three-set show. Let me just start out by saying that I had a fucking BLAST and would recommend the experience to any Phan that can swing it. I had only been to ten shows before the run started and was amped to scratch off a ton of tunes I'd been chasing, catch a bunch of killer jams, and relish in the energy of YEMSG. It's really tough for me to definitively say which night of the run was my favorite, as 4/21-23 were all spectacular. At the end of the weekend, I left feeling like N2 stood out as the strongest for a combined rarity factor with some excellent performances. However, after re-listening to this show, I think it might be N3. The actual NYE show is usually known to be one of the weaker performances, leaning more heavily on gag mileage than musical content. In this case though, I was consistently impressed by the output of the jams, even those which did not transcend time and space (but those, too!). Set 1 starts off with a really sweet Everything's Right that morphs and grows, ebbing and flowing very smoothly for a >15-minute opener. Tube has a tasty extended groove section where Mike and Fishman lay down some really excellent funk sauce. Trey's effect play here is pretty dope, as well, especially when combining the synth pedal with the delay. After a fairly standard 555, Fish and Page pull off an extended and gradual ascent that serves excellently for a developing Trey solo--I loved this one. Army of One was a nice choice for a run that was relatively lacking in Page vocals. One of the more unique jams I've personally caught, Axilla II's outro is harmonically and sonically rich, digging into some very deep textures as Fishman lingers on the laidback groove. The jam chart's choice of the word "hypnotic" is apt. I've never met a Bathtub Gin I didn't like, and though this one remains fairly straightforward, I thought the slow increase in energy was great. Fishman specifically drives this jam, ripping on the set even when the dynamics are bit more subdued. A VERY strong SANTOS closes out Set 1--one of the most spirited performances I've seen. This show only gets better in the second set, beginning with a big ol' SYSF that spends some time dabbling in shallow waters before fading to a space with slightly more murk and swirl. Around 12:20, the band sets on the foundation of a groove that'll take us to a phenomenal peak in which Trey is using his looper to duel soloing phrases with himself. The Happy Birthday teases are just icing on a cake that had the whole room in a state of euphoria. Light achieves some pretty sweet heights as well, landing in a groovy and celebratory jam space for the final minutes. Fishman is excellent all the while. Next up, Fuego is absolutely epic. The main song is executed spectacularly, and then we get an extended outro jam that establishes some very industrial tension, to use jam chart's verbiage again. The > into WTU? feels all too appropriate here, and the second half of the tune is absolute bliss (please just listen to Fish here). Finally, a special birthday BDTNL for Bella wraps up Set 2. And then the gag came. A buddy of mine came with me this night for his first show (what a first show to catch, lol), and his only request was "I hope they play Free." As soon as Trey started chugging away, we blew up. The stage setup was pretty low key for this tune, but the jam section was nice and tasty. When the band turned around to face the back of the arena, you could FEEL the excitement in the room (this would be repeated again during the Divided Sky pause the next night). I wasn't super familiar with A Wave of Hope before this show, but CK5 and the rest of the choreographers really helped me get into it with a spectacle waterfall/laser light show. When the dolphins and whale came out for Waves, it was game over: fucking killer gag. Waves itself was a bit drawn out and stagnant, but being there in person was mystical and enchanting, as Trey's playing emulated aquatic sonar calls--someone in that building had to be tripping way too hard at this point, hahaha. Sand moves through a number of excellent motions, most notably landing in a powerful, descending harmonic pattern established by Page. Set 3 closes as SOAM gets an atypically amorphous jam that creates a deep tension as the band explores the depths of the ocean floor. Very dooming and lurking. The It's Ice encore was a bit slow and the "underwater" section pretty short-lived, but the complex compositional pieces were nailed, so I was happy with the finish. Definitely an odd end to a show, as there wasn't your typical Hood-like peak or anything, but I found this show super refreshing and entertaining.
, attached to 1989-05-27

Review by thelot

thelot This source isn’t great due to multiple cassette generations in it’s lineage. On a positive note, there’s no pitch issues! Not much to really review for set 1 as it’s pretty straightforward. Trey tried to recreate the magic of last nights YEM but came up short. Unfortunately there’s a tape flip in the middle of the jam and picks back up before heading into the B&D section. The band blows the drop into the arrival section of Fluffhead. However, they recover and this flub inspires Trey to add a some extra mustard to his solo. Gin had a little bit more added to the ending. Weekapaug was solid but didn’t vary much from current versions.
, attached to 2003-02-22

Review by Shadowfox0

Shadowfox0 WEEKAPAUG GROOVE on her own a woman alone she does not need a man let her run wild and free and alone on her own fuck men Who needs Mike when you have his SHIT MAGIC Bass guitar slapping the shit out of Mike and the Security Dude at the Doorway Blocking the Way to a Hotel Fire Crazy night many people are lucky to be alive me included Great Show!! Not epic like 2-28 shortly thereafter but almost that good it was riding a wave about to peak and it did at IT and then Crashed down to earth like the song Friday which ironically sounds beautiful this time and only one other time the best ever 12-28-2003 Magic was in the air in Cincinnati that night for sure !! I felt it and so did the band
, attached to 1989-05-26

Review by thelot

thelot The SBD source for this one sounds fantastic! I wonder if this is an “On Stage” recording as the overall sound is a lot brighter than what you’d expect from a straight board recording. Unfortunately there is a cut on the backside of Mango and picks up halfway through Melt. Great banter among the band throughout the show. This source picks up their on stage conversations nicely. There’s also lots of great banter with the audience as well, most notably during the hi hat hijinks intro to Lazy Lester. This show is pretty darn good, but the 3rd set is perfection! Check out Mike’s bass tone during Slave and Funky Bitch! The Curtis Lowe is beautiful and the Possum brings back some of the silliness we heard the other night on Spear Street. Incredible version of Possum! The band had to wrap it up after that due to the venue shutting things down, but ended with the second and final version of the short little ditty, The Practical Song. The version here is much better quality than the debut on 9/12/88. Set 1 had a smokin’ YEM with Trey and Fishman teaming up in the jam section while Mike and Page take a breather. Definitely a must hear version! Mango in set 2 sounds different than previous versions. Unfortunately it cuts out prematurely. Highlights: Weekapaug, Sanity, YEM!!!, Bowie!!, Antelope, Slave!!! and Possum!!!
, attached to 1991-12-31

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ This is a really sweet NYE show that, like Amy's Farm, does an excellent job of capturing the state of the band in 1991. With a deep catalog of tunes, intra-band familiarity, and some of the hottest musical chops in the game, the band puts together three awesome sets of music relying on no gag outside of the cursing voice box (which fits excellently in both tone and rhythm on Wilson). From Set 1, a powerful Stash offers the dreadful dissonance, soaring soloing, and dastardly drumming present in many of the '94 performances; the band lifts Page to great heights in his solo on the Lizards; Trey and Fishman go ballistic on Divided Sky as Mike sprinkles some extremely tasteful bass riffs; and Llama runs absolutely wild in a '93 fashion. Set 2 opens with an unhinged Brother before bringing in the new year with Buried Alive>ALS. Immediately after this, Runaway Jim earns a spot in the jam charts with a celebratory energy driven by Fishman's jubilant bouncing and Trey's hose shredding. The subsequent Reba offers plenty of tasty snippets, though Trey's solo is cut a bit short and there isn't quite as much soaring as some of the better versions. That said, this performance has some really sweet band interplay, building energy as a cohesive unit. Some excellent moments of dissonant and chromatic soloing that resolves with bliss (~8:20-8:25 is sooo awesome), deviation from the typical harmonic pattern (8:45), and really spirited support from Page, Mike, Fishman. Definitely check out the goofy Set 3 Wilson opener; Trey's new toy adds a fun musical and colorful element to the classic. In my opinion, the Tweezer from this set is the earliest to really achieve Tweezer greatness. While many previous iterations have some sweet jams, this version grows new life from the standard form, venturing into uncharted territory with developed riffing, vocal interjections, and perpetual droning guitar to keep the fire blazing. This performance foreshadows some great things to come for future Tweezers. Page's solo on McGrupp balances a dancey groove and musical spirit quite well, forming one of the stronger '91 versions. Finally, we close Set 3 with a great Mike's Groove that eats well in the second Mike's jam. Some confusion in where to land causes the band to break down with some spicy cowbell and organ energy, taking a step back to rebuild again into -> H2. Weekapaug finishes the year with triumph and a nice Lion Sleeps tease. Last call out for the show is the wonderfully sleepy and timely Christmas Song Lawn Boy--an instant favorite.
, attached to 1985-05-03

Review by Shadowfox0

Shadowfox0 Page is my favorite of the fabulous four so I have to say that even though this show in many ways sucked and was average at best it did introduce my favorite member i love PIANO and all things Keyboards and it also included 3 debuts of non original covers that they have yet to ever play again which i guess is cool but neither were jam worthy or worth mentioning as covers either They just sucked like most of early 83-86 Phish but a few things stood out in those years At least Trey knew he was a rockstar His voice was really LOUD in these early days he was confident he knew he was a rockstar whether the world agreed yet or not until 1992 he knew he was awesome before the jam world did
, attached to 1991-11-24

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ I don't usually listen to too much pre-1993 Phish outside the official releases, but over the past month or so I've been trying to become a bit more familiar with the earlier stages of the band and listening to some older tapes. I don't think I'd ever heard mention of this show before this week, but its standout .net rating among 1991 grabbed my attention, and I had to throw it on Relisten. This show features some real strong musicianship, a couple of really tasty jams, and a diverse setlist that flows very naturally. Trey excels on Stash, and Page really digs into the keys on a YEM-funk-like It's Ice breakdown. The Fluffhead Arrival is optimistically triumphant and powerful, especially thanks to great energetic drumming on Fishman's part. The David Bowie that closes Set 1 dabbles with some really nice swanky riffing, slowly picking up energy and working in dissonant passages that weave between the semblance of a typical Bowie groove. The finish is traditional and classic, but executed with precision and grace. In Set 2, Divided Sky gets a slightly longer solo section as Trey and band push the envelope with blazing energy. This is a really fantastic version of the tune for '91, and imo belongs on the jam charts. The highlight of the show, however, is the penultimate YEM. As the charts point out, every segment is tremendous. The epic jam that ensues calls for some spirited head banging and plenty of stank face as the band blazes to a rocking groove. The slow burnout from here forms a sweet, ambient basin of sound before rebuilding and falling again. VJ is noteworthy for highly percussive elements that shy away from more melodic/harmonic space. Overall, a great early show with a few killer standouts. This is worth a listen, for sure.
, attached to 1989-05-21

Review by thelot

thelot This source is top notch! I guess the only thing to complain about would be the cut into Hood to start the tape and the harsh cut to end the tape during Sky. With that said, I’m grateful that part of this amazing show was recorded! If relaxed/loose/fun Phish isn’t your thing you may not care for this show. Believe it or not some fans dislike shows like 2/20/93 and 7/13/94. This set has it all. Great recording, great stage banter and great playing! What a treat it must’ve been to be at this party!
, attached to 1985-10-30

Review by Shadowfox0

Shadowfox0 All their shows in the 1983-1986 era were rather short even the 3 set shows were mostly covers of the dead or other bands because they were trying to make a name for themselves which makes sense All to say that Harry Hood is amazing from the gate This is the debut of the song that got me hooked on Phish! I also loved MFMF Dirt Horn Petrichor Slave Back on the Train Gotta Jibboo Fluffhead and Lizards those were my favorite songs and still are mostly Now I love Maze Piper Chalkdust Torture Sand more than those but at the time those were my favorites I now realize they always play their best versions of any given song on the live debut Life beyond the Dream was only played amazingly at Blossom 2019 debut HH has been played amazing since but this first version is also jam worthy even Joy was played well the first time at Camden a really shitty slow song was played best the first time Wading in the Velvet Sea played best at its debut 1997 in Europe Phish plays their best versions of songs from the gate I suppose an exception would be Show of Life an amazing song and great show closer or Encore played best not the first time but the 2nd time 6-11 was good but 6-19-2010 was better that show sucked in all but the Show of Life was EPIC another exception is Friday a song most fans hate like TTE a song that all fans hate like Petrichor I actually love the rain falling in Petrichor but agree that Time Turning Elastic is just boring like Sugar Shack or Let Me Lie really boring songs like Miss You or More I actually love the song More because I totally agree w the lyrics but most fans do not because they are atheist idiots who love Darwin not Jesus and the only songs i abhor by Phish are Friends Lifeboy Bug and Death Dont Hurt Very Long simply all lies I love Simple the song i amazing but simply those songs suck ass Harry Hood Possum and Sneaking Sally make this SHORT show amazing !!! and worthy of listening to backwards down the number line of time
, attached to 1989-05-20

Review by thelot

thelot The SBD source for this show is pretty flat sounding. The multiple cassette generations in it’s lineage doesn’t help. Set two’s pitch seems just a hair slow. Luckily this doesn’t take away from the energy of the performance. The show starts out just like Syracuse with AC/DC, Alumni, YEM. Trey even dedicates Alumni to the graduates again. The pairing was far stronger than what we heard in Syracuse. After the poor reception Trey got during his “Traveling minstrels from Gamehendge” rap at the Night Stage in Cambridge, I was curious how long it would be before he tried again…about 3 weeks. :) This attempt was far better received by the young boarding school audience. There’s a time and place for everything! Set 2 wasn’t quite as strong as set 1, but featured a nice Weekapaug and Bowie. It should be noted that the band references the shuttle buses in Contact. Fun show overall. The band seemed in good spirits and I would imagine they picked up some lifelong fans at this gig.
, attached to 1991-08-03

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Five years before Clifford Ball, Phish and their loyal cronies made the trek out to Auburn, Maine for what one could argue was the first ever Phish festival. Videos of all three sets are easily found on YouTube and worth checking out. Something about watching the dozens of in-frame fans, all shirtless to boogie, and the beaming smile on Trey's face is extremely heartwarming. Obviously the band had been on a steadily upward trajectory in terms of expanding their footprint, deepening the repertoire, and defining/refining their sound for a few years at this point, but this destination festival-esque show seems to mark a turning point where the career acceleration kicked up a notch. From a retrospective point of view, the band was hot off the heels of a great summer tour with Giant Country Horns and would soon hit the road again for a great Fall tour that would introduce many soon-to-be fan-favorite tunes, put on a killer New Year's show, and release a third killer album, [i]A Picture of Nectar[/i]. Perhaps I'm projecting, but I love to think of this show as a way to celebrate all the accomplishments of *early* Phish and usher in the next major chapter. Musically, the show boasts a fantastic setlist that covers most of the regular heavy-hitters in rotation at the time, plus a special Dude of Life encore set. From the top of Set 1, Trey's having a blast and carries Wilson, Foam, and Jim to great heights. The Divided Sky here (available on Live Bait Vol. 5) is an excellent early edition with ancestral ties to later 94 craziness. In Set 2, we get a really cool and groovy Reba jam that evolves into an emotional blaze very quickly. YEM begins a little rocky for Trey, but man all four boys absolutely rip the jam, including a super memorable VJ. From here, Fluffhead and Harry Hood standout for their phenomenal outro jams, each full of the vigorous joy I associate with this show and this chapter of the band's journey.
, attached to 1988-03-11

Review by stgsince88

stgsince88 I have to preface this by saying this is less of a show review than a tale of my experience. More than twelve years have passed and not once have I owned a tape of this show. As a freshman at Johnson State I spent most of the year partying in my dorm. This is because at the very first party I went to, they carded people to weed out us freshman losers. So after that I just never left campus. This was fine and dandy as political correctness hadn't yet taken over alcohol policies on campus, and the sky was the limit. My point is that not having anything else to do in a small town in Vermont forced me to head down to the Base Lodge for each and every show that happened. It was my money going into these shows and I wanted my money's worth from college! Most of what I saw was a disappointment. I came from the classic rock school of thought. My favorite bands at the time were Yes and Genesis, and no one could touch them as far as I was concerned. This was mainly because they were so different from everything else out there. But I kept an open mind. The ‘80s were bereft of quality music and I had had about enough of it, but that quickly changed one night at the Slodge. (We called it that as a term of endearment. Also the Moose Lodge, Space Garage…the names go on and on.) Anyway, there was a bit more of a stink made about this one show than the typical night at the Base Lodge. But that wasn't saying much; all it warranted was a slightly larger party than normal. Phish still wasn't that well known , even in Stearns, only thirty-five miles from Burlington. There were a few folks who made trips to Burlington to see them, but those travelers were few and far between. As for myself, it took this visit to my usual hangout to facilitate my first Phish show. After some typical college pre-show preparations, I went down to the Lodge, which was part of the student center. Strange that they didn't bring in enough of a crowd to play at Dibden (the auditorium) which isn't that big, but much bigger than the Lodge. The room couldn't hold much more than maybe a couple hundred, and on this night there was less than that. I kind of recall it feeling roomy. It didn't even take rubbing elbows to get to where I stood up front. I noticed that there were a few hippie-looking outsiders who had made the trip for the show. This in itself was pretty new to me. JSC had a large Dead following, but I hadn't been part of that so this Philly boy was in a new world. Once I got in place, I spent most of the night standing literally three inches away from Page's Hammond organ; in fact, I may even have been leaning on it. I watched the Leslie speaker spin round and round the whole time, and thought that was the coolest thing I had ever seen! I thought, "Man, what a cool band to have this neat thing." I was just smiling away and I caught Page laughing at my obvious amazement with the Leslie. They opened with “The Chicken”, followed by “Funky Bitch”, both songs I had never heard before. The performance didn't impress too much upon me, but it was rocking, garage band-type entertainment so I wasn't ready to leave just yet. Next came “Sneakin’ Sally”. I was a huge fan of this song at the time and they didn't disappoint me by playing it. That sealed the fact that I wouldn't be wandering back to my dorm room anytime soon. Following this they played “Take the A Train”. I didn't know jazz from a hole in the ground, but I did understand enough to know that this was not your ordinary band. It was the next tune that changed my life forever. When I first heard “YEM”, I knew that it was the end of an era. The lack of originality that marked the ‘80s had come to a screeching halt. This was the first Phish original I ever heard, and I was dumbfounded! This is the Phish sound. It's what differentiates them from other bands. It was incredibly refreshing to hear something so different. Yes, in progressive rock I had heard things like it, but this was different. And (for me) new. The way it kept intricately building into near noise until it exploded into a tight groove wasn't necessarily new to music, but the way this band did it was new to me. And such a distinct overall sound. Somehow it came from a band that came from the ‘80s. I sincerely thought I would forever be stuck in the world of classic rock from the ‘60s and ‘70s; yet here was a song that obviously was influenced by that music, but so different at the same time. They had opened up with covers and I thought they were just going to be a cover band with a few originals thrown in for good measure. But song after song of composition and improvisation with sick jamming continually bombarded me. I'll be honest that the only other thing I really recall after twelve years is “Lizards”. For some reason this song truly struck a chord in me. I left that night singing, "But I'm never ever going back there / and I couldn't if I tried / cause I come from the land of the Lizards / and the Lizards they have died / the Lizards they have died / the Lizards they have died!" After this, I wanted nothing but Phish in my ears. I knew there was finally hope in the world…musically, anyway. I saw them again in two months; if not for lack of a car, the return would have been even sooner. In retrospect, this unsuspecting night at the Lodge changed my life.
, attached to 1991-11-07

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ This is a pretty sweet Fall '91 show that features some really strong playing from all members of the band. Though only Set 2 was released on LivePhish, it's certainly worth checking out the first half of the show on Relisten (or wherever you get your tape goodies). Among some very solid performances--including a few of the new tunes!--this YEM is an absolute heater. Trey's solo section in particular ascends to crazy heights from a laidback but stanky start. Fishman helps facilitate some real gnarly jamming, playing with subdivisions and driving the energy forward with monstrous momentum. It's Ice and Runaway Jim also feature some great soloing from Page and Trey, respectively. In Set 2, things really take off. Clocking in at only five and a half minutes, this Brother wastes no time navigating to shrill, dissonant, jam space. It's very impressive the energy they achieve in such a compact song. In a similar vein, the Reba jam accomplishes some crazy beautiful moments despite making up less than half the tune's runtime. Including splashes of harmonic clash and a great soaring finale, this is certainly a notable performance for this early period in the band's career (check out 7/14/1991 for another great '91 Reba). Tube also grants some tight leashed greatness, as Page absolutely wrecks the keys on this version--would've loved to hear it go for a bit longer. Then Aquarium Rescue Unit joins Phish on stage--always a sign of greatness to come. This David Bowie, featuring some wild bass slapping, unhinged scatting from Col. Bruce Hampton, and utterly frenetic guitar dueling between Jimmy Herring and Trey, is beyond face-melting. The band sets into a swanky groove more akin to a YEM than a Bowie fairly early on, sowing the seeds of chaos. A very Type II breakdown ensues, followed by the reaping of a faster Bowie outro that bursts through the stratosphere around 11:30. For the love of God, listen to this Bowie. The Love You jam is pretty unique, and a breath of fresh air compared to the other performances as this one contains a bit more musical improvisation than novel goofiness. Finally, a tease/signal heavy Possum wraps up Set 2 with great ferocity (continued in the Fire encore). Something about that bayou water...the boys were absolutely shredding this show.
, attached to 1989-05-13

Review by thelot

thelot The sound quality for this show leaves a lot to be desired. There’s noticeable static that is present throughout the recording. I felt the performance was pretty straightforward for what they’ve done thus far. Set 1 felt longer than average. Unfortunately, Bowie cuts out as the jam starts. This is the first time I can recall that they extend the intro out a bit adding some teases from songs in the set. While set 1 was long I felt it never really gained any traction. I thought set 2 was better overall with beautiful versions of Hood and Whipping Post. Highlights: Possum, Hood and Whipping Post
, attached to 1989-05-13

Review by thelot

thelot The sound quality for this show leaves a lot to be desired. There’s noticeable static that is present throughout the recording. It I felt the performance was pretty straightforward for what they’ve done thus far. Set 1 felt longer than average. Unfortunately, Bowie cuts out as the jam starts. This is the first time I can recall that they extend the intro out a bit adding some teases from songs in the set. While set 1 was long I felt it never really gained any traction. I thought set 2 was better overall with beautiful versions of Hood and Whipping Post. Highlights: Possum, Hood and Whipping Post
, attached to 2021-08-01

Review by SkyTrainWand

SkyTrainWand I'll put in here for a show review what I entered for the phish.net JOTY contest about the Tweezer from THIS show: ... When they change into a major key for the first time I imagine slowly falling into a giant pillow. I was also present in the venue for this Tweezer. I finally got to where I needed to be for the jam and I remember feeling several times like *everyone* in my area was moving in this widespread chaotic synchronicity, like there were thousands of invisible rubber bands connecting everyone under the roof and probably on the lawn too. I'm sure some of you have noticed the "elastic" effect before, I think it happens every so often when the band and crowd manage to connect on a *deeper* level than usual. This Tweezer was exactly that - elastic. Phish metaphysics! The very first big peak in this one is SO GOOD and I swear there wasn't a single soul that wasn't dancing their ass off. There's a solid 12-13 minutes of jamming after that and all of it is awesome and that is why Tweezer wins. I am surprised that so many phans were still wearing pants after that incredible jam!
, attached to 1992-05-16

Review by bblock

bblock It's almost impossible to believe that it's been 30 years since my first Phish show at The Orpheum in Boston. They say you always remember your first - and I sure do. I've been privileged to see some 25+ shows over the years in 7 states including some standout performances including: * NYE 1992 at Matthew's Arena w/Dude of Life * NYE 1994 with the flying hot dog * The Real Gin at Worcester * 3 amazing nights in Hampton in 2013 * Tweezer Fest at MPP 2014 But, I hold a special place in my heart for 5/16/92 -- my first show! I was introduced to the band while in college at UPenn, when a friend of mine saw them at a tiny Philadelphia venue in February and brought back A Picture of Nectar CD. For the rest of the semester, I must have listened to that outstanding album about 5 dozen times. No music I had ever heard before sounded like this amazing band! My Deadhead roommate painstakingly figured out most of Stash on his guitar. For the next several months, I found rec.music.phish and started trading tapes with kind souls around the country to find as much live Phish as I could. Little did I know what was in store when returning home to Boston for the Summer. A few days after coming back to my suburban Boston home, I was at a buddy Dave's house and preaching to him the gospel of Phish. Casually, Dave said he was going to see them on Saturday! [b]What?! GTFO![/b] Immediately I ordered two tickets and invited my friend Mike to the show. Saturday night we arrived outside The Orpheum and enjoyed people watching the crowd outside the venue. Someone offered us to trade our decent tickets and a few bucks for tickets in the 3rd row front and center. What a great decision. The Orpheum held less than 3,000 people, yet being up front for my first Phish experience will never be forgotten. The energy in the room was electric and at some points, it felt like the entire balcony was going to fall down on top of everyone with the frenzied dancing and partying. The music was great and I know that I had a blissful ear to ear smile on my face all night long. Of course, back in 1992, Phish's repertoire wasn't close to the depth and breadth that it is now. However, the playlist reads like absolute classic Phish and many of these songs are still chased by fans to this day. While standard fare today, watching the boys in 1992 smoothly segue from one song to another was a sight to see and a sound to behold. The jokes, teases, trampolines, and a cappella were all new and fresh. I loved this band. We had a blast at this show and then 3 more in 1992, including at a tiny baseball field called Holman Stadium in Nashua, NH where we enjoyed a set by Phish and an entire show by Santana and some jamming together. Morning after my first show on 5/16/92, my parents asked about the show and the band, and I told them that they were "4 extremely talented musicians who are clearly having a fantastic time on stage making & creating. not just playing, music" Certainly that answer still holds up 30 years later.
, attached to 1991-07-19

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ I admittedly haven't listened to a ton of summer '91--just the official LivePhish releases and whatever gems Shapiro has included in Live Bait releases. As far as full shows goes, I think the criticism of setlist repetition is certainly fair and dissuades me from diving much deeper into the rest of the tour. With that said, I do really love the GCH arrangements of these regular rotation songs. Having the horns present really takes a few of these songs to a new place that can make one forget they're even listening to Phish (Landlady, Gumbo, Magilla, and Lawn Boy especially glow up with the horn solos). Outside of the more straightforward tunes on this show, there are a few notable highlights. For me, the most obvious is YEM. Frankly I'm surprised this isn't in the jam charts; while the tune doesn't ever really stray from the typical groove, all members of the band and horn ensemble bring their A-game. Plenty of excellent dynamic variance, fun Frankenstein and Chameleon elements, and a VJ that leans on the trumpet and percussion for a uniquely afrobeat energy all mark this performance as exceptional in my book. Tweezer comes with some nice dissonance and a steadily ascending energy driven in part by Fishman's vocal ramblings. The presence of the horns on this one definitely helps contribute to the feeling of chaos brewing throughout the jam. Really excellent playing on David Bowie as well (as always :) ), and I LOVE the sax solo on the outro of Mango Song--wish that was a more common element of the song because it just feels so, so right.
, attached to 1988-05-15

Review by stgsince88

stgsince88 I was there. I was at Johnson State College at the time. My sister was at UVM. My finals were over so I went to burlington to hang out with my sister before we both went home for the summer. She said we were going to a friends farm to see a band called Phish. I said I know Phish they played t my school on 3/11 and I loved them so I was excited. WE drove to Hinesburg and it was simply a huge keg party on a farm. The stage was just next to a river/stream that was cold as ice. In it were many kegs. And playing was Phish. On the other side of the river were hiking trails and I thought it was great that they had signs for the trails that were like ski trails with the same ratings, blue square, diamond, double diamond etc. What blew me away though was this band I saw at my school 2 months earlier. For some reason it was lizards that really hit me, I fucking love this band!! And here I am 34 years later with the same love.
, attached to 2022-04-21

Review by Dinner_in_Alaska

Dinner_in_Alaska For me, sitting solo this night I was never alone. In a room filled with friends known and unknown, my friend and brother on N2 was the music and the music from start to finish was a beautiful dream. I want to highlight how wonderful the build up to our lift off was. First, having Suzy at her first show and the band opening with her song was just exactly what Phish is, fucking crazy! Suzy Greenberg’s first show? GTFO that’s fucking amazing! Loved it. A proper rocker 46 Days then led us into my very first and long sought after Plasma. This next thing I say may be weird, but TMWSIY was the launching point for me. I just felt that during the beauty and magic of the quiet notes ringing out over us (not a single talker in my section to boot), that we were collectively passing through a portal to a new place that is mapped out for a brief time in the music being played. My expectations soared after the Hebrew prayer was sung and with the closing notes of TMWSIY we launched into a Wolfman’s whose ragging peak of a close will speak for itself for years to come. Listening back in the pause after, a guy in the crowd is yelling , “Sing Monica!” but Trey wanted to tell the story of Esther and so they did. Having only recently caught my first live version (see The Gorge) I was just as excited to get it again at my next run of shows. Our story of Esther ended were the Story of the (good god almighty) Ghost begins! What a way to end the first set, my heart was already so full. I could go on and on about the 2nd set, but I’m not. It speaks for itself and many others have left their wonderful thoughts on it. I will only say this, the Your Pet Tweezer is My Pet Tweezer. That beautiful uplifting jam is my jam. It’s been the background music in my head nonstop since that night. As I sit here in my projects office alone in the Arctic writing this review, in place of writing about the rest of the 2nd set, I’m going to once again listen to it and follow the road map through the portal of space and time to that place, even if I can only glimpse it for a moment. I highly recommend you do the same. Cheers.
, attached to 1989-05-09

Review by thelot

thelot Sound quality is decent enough. It sounds like the pitch may be a hair sharp. Almost sounds like the source cassette may have sat on the car dash for a summer or two. The show itself is pretty strong. However, most of the action takes place during the second set. Set 1 was highlighted by a strong Weekapaug, Possum and Sky. Set 2 was fantastic but the guest “Hijack” during I Didn’t Know was like nails on a chalkboard. I actually kind of enjoyed the last time Eyeburn came out on 3/12/89 at Nectars, but this time was kind of annoying. I Didn’t Know I was that far gone…”yes you did!” lol One thing of note about I Didn’t Know that’s not listed is that they say Pardon me Daubs instead of Doug. Another incredible version of Harpua tonight! Somewhat of a sister version to the last one played at The Zoo on 4/20. Unfortunately, If I Don’t Be There by Morning is missing from the recording. YEM is a must hear, as is the Slave->Esther combo. Slave is unfinished and Esther is perfect if not for the botched ending. Antelope to follow is also a must hear. Even La Grange and Bold as Love slay! Check it out!
, attached to 1991-07-12

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Every once in a while it's fun to return to the summer '91 shows with the Giant Country Horns. Most of my Phish listening focuses on '93 and beyond, as I believe is the case for most Phans. By turning back the clock to earlier shows, we get some great tunes that fell out of regular rotation as well as some that stuck around as staples but sound distinguished this early in the band's development. Throw in the Giant Country Horns with some nice solos and excellent arrangements and you've got yourself a show that stands out from the usual listening. As a 3.0 Phan, I began my exploration of the catalog relatively late in the band's career. By chance, Spotify directed me to 7/12/91 for a couple versions of tunes that would help form the foundation for the rest of the journey, namely AC/DC Bag and Mike's Song. Though these two performances are obviously a little different from the songs' typical styles, I fell in love with each and to this day still miss the call and response between Trey's vocals and GCH on Bag's chorus. These two biggest hitters from this show feature some really excellent playing by Trey, who was really beginning to heat up his chops at this point. The rest of the show features some strong versions of other tunes (especially David Bowie and Gumbo), and plenty of interesting horn accompaniment that breathes fresh life into the usual repertoire. Aside from the aforementioned, I feel that the Landlady, Cavern, Golgi, and Suzy Greenberg really glow up with the addition of GCH. In addition, the jazz tunes Flat Fee, Donna Lee, and Moose the Mooche fit excellently into the set for some diversification (perhaps even better than some of the acoustic bluegrass tunes prevalent in '93). A couple final shoutouts for Tweezer, where I was really impressed with the incorporation of additional horn riffs on top of the already busy and intricate rhythms produced by the core 4, and Frankenstein, which did more truthful justice to Edgar Winter with the brass (even if Page's synth was absent). All around, this is a very fun show from a unique period for the band. It's fun to imagine what some other later Phish tunes may have sounded like had GCH remained a more integral part of the band's career, though I guess TAB sort of gives us a taste of that.
, attached to 1993-08-26

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ The penultimate show from a legendary tour, 8/26/93 serves as an excellent sample of summer '93. Both sets contain some ridiculously awesome jamming, though Set 1 is a bit more consistent and filled out (as is the case with a few other big shows from this month). This distinction is largely due to the amount of set real estate left for Baby Gramps' sit-in and the HYHU performance, a touch akin to many of the other August '93 shows that featured HYHU, Purple Rain, or acoustic/a cappella sessions that demonstrate novelty over prowess. While moments like these are certainly central to the band's character, and I would never wish them out of this transitional phase into a more matured group, the gag loses some of its initial luster after one listens through enough of the tour--especially when these moments consistently close otherwise fantastical shows and rinse away the taste of the more jaw-dropping jams. Regardless, this show has plenty to unpack and is a fantastic representation of the band at this stage in their career. Set 1 is fully loaded with noteworthy performances, including a playfully climbing Runaway Jim opener, another Reba that grips the heart in August '93 fashion, a Fee that includes a heavily Type II outro, a SOaM that demonstrates a maturing approach to improvisation involving the entire band with true direction (my god the end of this jam is so fucking sick), and a Harry Hood that really milks the ascent before reaching its glorified acme. The whole band stays on point through the whole set, but I'll give a special shoutout to Page, who shines exceptionally bright--especially on Esther and It's Ice. Set 2 starts off with that beloved 2001 opener before diving right into David Bowie. Summer '93 has produced many incredible Bowie jams, and this example is no exception. The jam here sticks a little more strictly to the recognizable Bowie elements than the uber-exploratory performance from 8/17/93, with only a few moments that break free of the usual groove and harmonic movement (though Trey works in plenty of nice improvisational riffs that build atop the foundation). That said, any dearth of adventure is easily made up for with an insane ferocity. The energy behind this jam is fucking high octane, and the band definitely deserves the easy breezy Lifeboy that follows. Surviving a somewhat rough Rift, the band dials back in for a KILLER JJLC. Once again, Page is operating on another level, delivering those ZZ Top vocals with grit and swagger before absolutely commanding the room during his piano solo. Trey follows suit, taking the band sky high and then crashing back down to earth. As stated before, the rest of the set's highlights come from the goofy HYHU>Nothin' But>HYHU, not quite as praiseworthy in my book. A strong CDT and Free Bird encore closes the show with an appropriate juxtaposition of pure musicianship against a goof that caters to the band's burgeoning in-group community.
, attached to 1993-08-17

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ August '93 has got to be one of the band's hottest and most consistent months. The musicianship, deep repertoire, and exploratory spirit represented in each show on the tour speaks to the phase of development Phish was in at the time. Most notable is the regular prevalence of Type II jamming, which results in dozens of notable and formative performances over the course of a few weeks. The improvisational approach is noticeably still maturing (as it would continue to do so through the next few years), and often comprises of a decomposing / fragmenting a jam, riding along with some harmonic dissonance and rhythmic interplay, and then capitalizing on some new idea that's birthed out of this less structured section without a very fluid transition. While this methodology no doubt produces some awesome music and leads to extremely creative jams, it can also sometimes feel a bit like the band is lost in these liminal segments, looking for some idea with more substance to inspire further jamming. 8/17/93 provides two examples of tunes that I think really demonstrate more thoroughly developed Type II jams: David Bowie and YEM. Sets 1 and 2 both contain some really awesome performances of other tunes: Wilson transitions into Llama with a cool improvisation that launches the show at high velocity from the get-go, Divided Sky and Maze showcase Machine Gun Trey's chops, Fluffhead and FEFY produce some very powerful solo sections, and Page goes balls-to-the-wall on Suzy. But the main focus of this show should be on Bowie and YEM. Hot off a 2001 set opener, David Bowie dives right into the composed section, forgoing a more unique intro like the one from Murat. However, once the jam begins, it's clear that something special is about to take place. Sections of this jam transition together with such natural fluidity that it's hard to draw distinct lines between them. Through rhythmic variations and key changes, Trey does a particularly phenomenal job changing seats between a soloing guitarist and a band leader that contributes more directly and explicitly to the groove of the moment. Along with Stash 8/15/93, this is one of my absolute favorite August '93 jams. YEM brings a similar improvisational prowess, breaking free of the traditional YEM groove during Trey's solo to develop on a few different cadences, including an utterly blazing jam inspired by Frankenstein. The following BnD jam is swanky and laid back, giving way to an extended VJ. Definitely check these two tunes out.
, attached to 1989-05-06

Review by thelot

thelot The sound quality is so so on this one. I’m sure the Master audience recording sounds amazing though as it still isn’t too bad. Unfortunately, there are multiple splices and cuts throughout. With that said, this show is pretty darn good!! Some notes: Esther still features the Gamehendge introduction which started at The Zoo on 4/20. Forbin>Mockingbird has narration between tracks for the first time. Sloth still features the composed ending. Possum follows once again with no segue. Show Highlights: YEM, Mike’s Groove, Esther, AC/DC, Bowie!!!, Hood, Slave!!!, Sky
, attached to 1993-08-15

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Sandwiched right between the highly regarded 8/13 Murat, 8/14 Tinsley Park, 8/16 St. Louis, and 8/17 Kansas City performances, 8/15/93 in Louisville marks as the halfway point in a crazy 5-night stretch of consecutive shows. As each of the other aforementioned shows have their own LivePhish release, this one might not get as much attention from the Phan base. While it might not be as consistently amazing as the surrounding evenings, it's definitely worth checking this one out on Relisten, if only for a few tunes (Stash is a required listening for Phans). Set 1 has some great moments among a uniquely Phishy arrangement of Caravan (jazzheads have to listen to this one), a Runaway Jim that climbs from delicacy to a mighty peak through a nice jam, and a Fee with a cheeky, dreamlike groove appended to the outro that gives Mike a bit of spotlight. The heavy hitter of the show is most certainly Stash, which I believe reaches Top 3 Ever status (among 11/14/95 and 7/2/97). To copy an earlier description I wrote: [i]In contrast to some of the more capricious jams from summer of '93, this one builds on itself and evolves with extreme patience that challenges one to delineate distinct sections. Around 11:00, the band aligns on a fantastically optimistic mixolydian groove full of rhythmic and melodic elements reminiscent of Mango Song. The less-organized blend back into Stash plays extremely well.[/i] After this, a fun Colonel Forbin-> Mockingbird and CDT take us home. Set 2 starts with a nice Rift, followed by a big summer of '93 Tweezer. This one covers a lot of Type II ground, working in some Tweezer-based riffing, Antelope-style higher tempo groove, and dissonant reggae influence, and ultimately working its way back to a blazing Tweezer and burning out to a slow stop. The rest of Set 2 is less notable, hitting a couple more standard electric tracks (including a Maze that lives up to its great August 93 peers), and then transitioning to an acoustic/a cappella set up that capitalizes on the intimacy of the venue. While I'm sure this would've been special to witness, it ends things on a lower note from a tape-listener's perspective. Thankfully, the band opts for a Harry Hood encore to inject one last bit of jam into the evening. The Hood jam scratches the itch for sure, dabbling in more patient and subdued ground (and even teasing a Dorian modal shift for a quick second) before arriving at the peak. *chef's kiss*
, attached to 1989-05-05

Review by thelot

thelot The source info has this listed as a Cass/2 SBD , but I’d venture to guess this is an “On Stage” microphone recording with the mics being closer to Trey and Page on the stage. Noticeable splice in YaMar. Unfortunately the majority of the song is cut. Beautiful recording overall though! It’s unclear if there was any other songs played after McGrupp? I would imagine theres more to Set 2. Another well played show for the western Mass fans. Donna Lee made an appearance for the first time since it’s debut at Goddard on 10/29/88. Highlights: YEM, Alumni, A-Train, McGrupp
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