, attached to 1998-11-09

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This is one of the very best shows from this year. And that is due to not just a very strong 2nd set but also an incredibly good 1st set. Divided Sky is epic, has to be one of the longest pauses ever. Trey just relishes it and keeps going with it very inspired version. The Frankie Says after is my favorite version and likely one of the very best ever played. Free is also in the conversation for best version ever, it gets super funky and the guys are as linked together as they can be. And to end this epic set is likely the best version they've ever played of Bold as Love. Best this best that. Yes this set is the business. You'd think they were out of gas by Set 2. But no you get a nice big Gin jam right out of the gate. You get swept up into a sky of bliss right away. And although it does have some parts and pieces from Gins before it's near flawless in it's execution. You get a nice bustout with TMWSIY>Avenu>TMWSIY. The Moma Dance is solid. And YEM is a straight up dance party from beginning to end, very fun version. And there's nothing quite like a Frankenstein encore with Freebird as the cherry on top. This gets a rare 5 stars from me, it has everything I want in a show.
, attached to 1997-12-03

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I've already forgotten what went down in the Drowned, and pretty much the first set at large, in this first listen to this show preceding my review, but I did enjoy the set and especially the Drowned. I didn't recognize the Couldn't Stand the Weather jam (shame on me.) Gumbo's decelerated jam kind of recalls the similar jam in the Character Zero from the night before at the same venue. But the Bowie is the star of this show, IMO. (Or, if you please, the David Bowie -> Possum > Jam!) I don't know if I had heard an unfinished Bowie very frequently before... is 12/29/94 unfinished? But this one seemed familiar to me from listening to the entirety of 3.0. It's kind of a bliss jam, but with hints of machine-gun Trey. I'd like to hear other jams in a similar style. The Jam after Possum was just good-time cowfunk, but it was very enjoyable. I liked the Hood, a lot, too. Crossroads encore makes me think of how Trey could never seem to remember and/or properly deliver the lyrics to either that cover or Izabella, but how it kind of didn't matter, because they fitted so perfectly in the Fall '97 sound and because they give him a chance to really let 'er rip. I give this show 4 stars out of 5. Maybe some recency bias is in play--LOL, on a 20-year-old show--because I've just finished listening to it, but I enjoyed yourself.
, attached to 1998-11-07

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw A very solid show from front to back. Mikes song has a gorgeous little jam very similar to an early Simple jam. Billy Breathes also stands out a little bit as a very good version. Weekapaug although not the typical shredtastic type is very cohesive and inspired, a great cap to the set. Bag gets very deep and is a great example of a 98' ambient jam, it features some fantastic work by Page and great layering by Trey. Ghost has a jam that doesn't meander all that far but is still very good, it also features a good little outro jam similar to the end of the Halloween Wolfman's Brother just a week or so before. Reba again comes back into the second set, and although it does not trail off into space like 10/29/98 it features great work by Trey in his solo section.
, attached to 1997-12-02

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show is amazing. I thought the Ghost in the first set was something--and it was!--but hold on to your butts when you listen to Set II! Each segue is masterful, just as happened to be mentioned in the .Forum yesterday. I think the most impressive for me is Simple -> Dog Faced Boy, with Dog Faced Boy taking on a Catapult-like free-floater attribution, in that it's not played to its usual accompaniment. Even Character Zero gets some shenanigans thrown in! If you need any reason to check out Fall 1997 beyond the archival and CD releases, this show is a [s]good[/s] towering example of what's to be found for the attentive listener. Pudding!
, attached to 1999-09-18

Review by deathmetalhippy

deathmetalhippy The woman was a dream I had Though rather hard to keep For when my eyes were watching hers, they closed, and I was still asleep For when my hand was holding hers She whispered words and I awoke And faintly bouncing round the room The echo of whomever spoke And I awoke, and faintly bouncing round the room The echo of whomever spoke... I had something to say about this show and then Bouncing came on and I just wanted to sing along.
, attached to 2009-06-06

Review by kipmat

kipmat IT is elusive, as Charlie Dirksen might say. Some shows just don't have IT. Sometimes you get a mid-first-set Lawn Boy or a mid-second-set Heavy Things that kills a set's momentum, or a Prince Caspian set-closer, or a Bug set-closer, or way too many mid-tempo head-bobbing ditties and not enough jams. Sometimes you get a Fluffhead where a Tweezer should be. Sometimes Mike has amp problems that make his bass sound distorted, or Trey completely boffs the heavy metal section of Harry Hood, or some dude runs onto the stage and throws off the band's concentration during the middle of the encore. Some shows are like that. This is not that show. IT might appear, at first glance, that this show would be like that. But from the first notes of Trey's solo in Stealing Time, the Phish from Vermont have come to your town to BLOW YOUR MIND, and have a blast while doing it. This show is a good candidate for a "Just Jams" mix, as every time the band stumbles during the composed part of a song, they come back with some strong jamming. The collective improv in Seven Below and Harry Hood is up there with the best of this tour, Leo gets his licks in during Taste, Fluffhead, and Mule, and the New, Improved Big Red carries the load like a government mule during Jibboo, Caspian, Possum, and Julius. I've been listening through the shows from Summer 2009, and I can assure you that the four shows preceding 6/6/09 are not as good as this show. And yet, this show currently has the third-lowest rating of all the shows from 2009. I might presume that the show was attended by a cadre of JadedVets(tm) that stood in the pavillion with their arms folded, rolling their eyes at the lack of bustouts and groaning when the band makes a mistake... except that I hear nothing but loud, delirious cheering and applause on the recordings. I must therefore conclude that this show is significantly underrated, and when you are getting tired of Fall '95 or Summer '15, you should call 6/6/09 Great Woods. "Hey, how you doin' there? Yeah, do a little dance for us... Let's hear it for That Guy, right there! Hey, That Guy! There he is... That Guy! He's getting thrown out, and he's going to miss the next song... BUT WE LOVE HIM!"
, attached to 2017-03-08

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show is special. Hearing Trey in such an intimate environment--with some of his closest and oldest friends in attendance, to boot--is a rare privilege. The banter is really the overarching highlight here, in my opinion. Trey, at one point, mentions VH1 Storytellers, which is kind of what this show resembles. The crowd was mostly quiet during the songs, but each time Trey starts one up, a roar comes from the crowd, or sometimes a wave of roars. I have no way of knowing if that's what Trey wanted, but the parts where he invites the crowd to sing along--he actually thanks them for filling in at one point--are enjoyable. I think I would have to say the Marley-memorializing Horse > Silent, the Walfredo, and the Summer of '89 are the biggest highlights, but the bustout of Discern is also very cool.
, attached to 2003-07-25

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Just a couple of notes on this show. The first set is pretty tight even with a nice Gin jam sprinkled in the middle. The second set segues are pure butter especially the ->Heavy Things. It should also be noted that this is likely the best version I have ever heard of Heavy Things. The two big jams tucked away at the end of the show are also fairly solid, but I can't help but mention in my opinion they feel forcefully stretched out and not as cohesive or inspired as one may hope. Just my opinion take it for what it's worth.
, attached to 1998-11-04

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show excites me! Thanks to the tapers, especially the one whose AUD I'm listening to right now. That's unusual placement for Character Zero, but it works. Bathtub Gin, I think, is more notable than the Ya Mar; Gin was just 2 legit 2 quit in 1998. Birds of a Feather packs a punch for its 6-some minutes. The amazing part of the first set, if you're into ambience, is the jam out of Frankie Says (-> David Bowie.) It's just gorgeous, soothing calm. The Moma Dance in the second set has a somewhat extended intro, at least in comparison to 3.0 versions. At this point in Phishtory, I'm sure some phans wondered if (and hoped that) Black-Eyed Katy would return; The Moma Dance had only been debuted on I think 6/30/98. That toe-tapping dance didn't last long, though, did it? Chalkdust is also phenomenal, and Coil is its usual thrilling and charming self. I'd have to say this is an average-great show, but--and I'm reticent to say this--average-great meant something somewhat different in Fall '98 than it has for the majority of 3.0. For what it's worth!
, attached to 1999-09-11

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I've just finished listening to this show in full for the first time. I'd heard the Wolfman's Brother -> Sand on the most recent From the Archives. Tube gets the show off to a great start, and though standard in length, is truly inspired. Billy Breathes is given a faithful, emotional reading, followed by the debut of Heavy Things. While listening to this debut, I tried to think about the vocal melodies as if they were being played by Trey on guitar. They're somewhat simple, but when viewing the song as a whole, they make quite a lot of musical sense, IMO. Guyute is played pretty capably for 1999. The aforementioned Wolfman's -> Sand was so long that I can't remember all that much about the Wolfman's--even just having finished listening--but the Sand was remarkable for 1. Mike sticking to Tony Markellis's bassline with little variation for the entire duration, and 2. for the patient jamming that leads to a rewarding peak. Next, Meatstick (sans Japanese lyrics) has a nearly subliminal segue into Maze, which offers Page's most inspired playing of the show (again IMO.) Hood's "atypical, repetitive ending" is kind of interesting. I'd say this is an average-great show, probably 3/5 stars, but I would revisit that Tube--amongst other portions of this show--again without hesitation.
, attached to 1997-11-19

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I used to think the big deal with this show was the Wolfman's Brother. It's a very long jam, to be sure, but it's not quite as colorful sonically as many classic Phish jams. In fact, I like both the 2001 and the Makisupa more than the Wolfman's: the 2001 because I like every 2001 and because this one is longer and groovier than recent 3.0 2001s have been, and the Makisupa because IIRC this is the first Makisupa I've heard go Type II, which is a welcome novelty. The first set was more phun for me to listen to than the second set was, this 'go-round. Gin is amazing, with an interesting segue into Llama. Limb by Limb was still relatively new at this time, and if you want to hear an atypical, early version of it, listen to this one. Theme is magisterial, as always, and as it especially was during 1997 (Taste also had a great 1997.) The Meatstick tease out of Fee is pretty cool to hear. If I was ganna play @Icculus with this show--according to his reputation for liquidating sets--I'd be unable to, because I'd need the Gin -> Llama and 2001 and Makisupa, at least. Thankfully, we don't have to settle for audiocassettes anymore, and there are MP3s downloadable and streaming. As much as I may sound like the Wolfman's isn't really above-average, I certainly enjoyed it as a newer phan when it was included as filler on Live Phish 11/17/97, and I could totally go for this show being archivally released! (I could go for any and all shows being archivally released, to be quite honest!) Thank you.
, attached to 1998-10-29

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I really liked listening to this show for the first time just now, even though I'm kind of moody today. Julius is a great choice for an opener, IMO. Driver, Sleep, Frankie Says kinda zonked me, but McGrupp brought me back around. I'd venture the opinion that McGrupp briefly goes Type II in this version. I must've missed the Super Bad tease in Moma, but I sure got excited about that Type-II Reba (-> Walk Away -> Simple!) Albuquerque is a great song, but it makes me kinda forlorn to hear it, because of connotations with the hiatus and all those complicated feels. Something encore is perfect for this phan, though. Excelsior!
, attached to 1997-07-21

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This show kills! Ghost comes out of the gate hot. The new batches of songs are all played very well. And Gin is absolutely fantastic and although it's no 11/23 it is one of the best of the year. The whole 2nd set is a fun time. Wolfmans is clean and the Magilla bustout comes out of nowhere. Bowie has a nice stretch to it and the Theme>Jam is pure mayhem reminiscent of a Late 80s Early 90s dead jam. The whole show is very solid and is Jamtastic!
, attached to 2016-06-26

Review by DiscoEyedUch

DiscoEyedUch This was my most highly anticipated Phish show for me in years. 4 year break from Deer Creek finally was over, when the summer tour was announced and I saw Deer Creek on there, I absolutely freaked out. I love seeing our band in my hometown venue, (a legendary one at that) Coming off of two nights at Wrigley, I was pretty beat from partying the entire weekend and lack of sleep, so we made the 3 hour trek from Chicago back home, but in this case, instead of relaxing after a run, we had another phish show to go to. Got home about 3 and tried to take a nap but couldn't contain my excitement. Went to pick up my buddy who was going to his first show, then halfway there, I realized I forgot the tickets, thank god DC Is about 10 minutes away so I could easily stop by the house and grab em and head out. I was running on fumes at this point but I didn't care, I knew there was going to be weather in the area heading down, It wouldn't be a real Deer Creek show if mother nature didn't make her way into the spotlight. I was running around the lot, seeing friends I haven't seen in a while, some I just saw the night before in Chicago, when the delay was announced. so the clouds rolled in and we headed back to the car to relax and ride it out. Security came around on golf carts with megaphones saying "The Gates are now open, if you wish to head inside, do it now" So we jumped at that chance and headed for in, Right as that happened the rain came down as we were getting through doors, a cheer came through the standing crowd and the energy level spiked up as everybody was ready for the VT boys back in the cornfields. Arrived at the spot in the lawn page side, it was the shortest time I've had to wait for lights. It was about 9PM when the lights went down and the band came on to a packed Deer Creek. No tuning, no talk on stage, My Friend chords struck 35 seconds after trey walked on stage, they were ready, as were we. I will say, the energy level was a bit weird, the delay had something to do with that i assume. the sound in the lawn on Page side was a bit off for the first couple of songs. adding to the weird energy and odd sound, camel walk was slowed down and trey had multiple flubs in the intro but finally got his mojo right at the breakdown. As trey finally got back into the groove and the band was on the same level, Mother Nature approved of the band getting tight so she opened the skies to show her appreciation and rained down on all that were in the lawn. It was welcoming as it was in the 90s prior. All in all, the show was a good one, not the best of 3.0 but for a sunday night in Indiana, it was very well received with me. I was just happy to be back at Deer Creek with my favorite band.
, attached to 1995-10-06

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw 1995 Stashes new fail do they? The early rendition of Billy Breathes is pretty great as well. Reba is perfectly executed and just gorgeous. Free has a nice little evil section in the middle with some great work by Page. Maze is standard Fire for this time period. Theme is also exceptionally strong. Tweezer is very cohesive throughout and although it doesn't go anywhere too deep or weird it is a great example of the guys firing on all cylinders. All around average/above average show. Its right there.
, attached to 1994-10-13

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This show is fairly straightforward....For 94's high standards. This in my opinion is an experiment show. Some songs are stretched out a tiny bit. There are little experimental moments within some songs. And definitely some experimenting with the setlist. DWD has a pretty awesome guitar solo by Trey. Foam is stretched out a little bit a pretty top notch version. Stash goes for a little ride with some interesting experimentation. The second set has a very awkward pace to it. But none the less it has some great peaks. Antelope is pretty stock but strong. This is when things start getting a little bit odd. They slow down with If I could I would. Then go into It's Ice's odd rhythm. And then follow it up with some acappella in Amazing Grace. They proceed with a very strong Mike's Sandwich. They toss in Yerushalayim Shel Zahav to kind of give it a spacey vibe (again experimenting). It is all followed by Weekapaug that gets very experimental with little break down sections by the guys. Near the end Trey just slaughters the guitar, he's totally in control and on fire. Then the guys move around again an play some Phishgrass. Then they get back on electric and play Cavern. Whew! What a workload! Fire is well fire as an encore. The whole show is a big experiment and historically may be looked at on the more disjointed and less appetizing side. But these are the shows that made the guys perfect there setlist. And hey the playing in this show is nothing to frown at!
, attached to 1995-06-24

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This is a pretty strong show. It's got a lot of solid and unique things sprinkled throughout the show. I really enjoy the segue into Rift in its prized 2nd song slot to get things rolling. Stash is very strong and intense as it should be. Coil has a notably beautiful piano solo at it's end that I like better than most. They burn through a couple quick tunes to start set 2 until they unearth another massive Bowie. This bowie does not follow the same rules as a 94' Bowie. It drops into some nice spooky space for a little bit before rising from the ashes into a fireball, fantastic version. Suzy Greenburg is also a notably solid version minus some of the quirkiness at parts. Hoods Mr. Miner section is insane and unique, Fish nails the entire transition section. This set feels more strung together then dense but everything is still pretty well played. Bold as Love is a standout thanks to Trey's explosive solo, very inspired version.
, attached to 1999-12-16

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is on the shorter side as far as Phish shows go, but it packs a wallop. Wilson seemed to get extended every now and then, even if just a little bit, during 1999; you can hear this on the other archival releases from that year. Chalkdust excels in energy, as does Possum, and everything in between is played well, however succinctly. Trey seems to be in frontman mode for this show. Sand is a very long version, but Mike mostly sticks to Tony Markellis's bassline throughout the jam. It's still a great jam, though, IMO, and is characteristic of 1999. Tweezer is even better, reminding me of Fall 1997, with the loops and ambient washes undergirded by a strong foundation of cowfunk. I could've dealt with the Runaway Jim being longer, but this is a show I am really into right now and love to hear.
, attached to 2016-12-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads A cappella to open again, recalling the similar trend of 10/31/14 songs opening the Halloween Run earlier that year. This show was more phun than memorable musically, IMO, but don't let that stop you from listening closely to Sets II and III, especially. 2001 > Carini -> Twist > Piper -> Ass Handed > Piper > Sand is quite a run of jams (well, Ass Handed is more of a microjam, I guess, LOL.) The third set is really spectacular to watch from the webcast, with horns and so on, all listed in the setlist notes. The choreography was truly awesome. I'm glad the three band members other than Trey were willing to let members of his band guest at this show. Now let's just get Scott onstage now and again, not to mention Oteil again!
, attached to 2016-12-30

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads A cappella to open again, noice! Cities gets taken out to the ballgame, with synth and Echoplex interplay prominent. Gin is a standout version, IMO, reminiscent in some ways of a Summer 1998 Gin. Sugar Shack is performed better than is usual for 3.0. Tweezer > Sparks > Ghost > Light -> Party Time is the meat of the second set, and that's how I like it: long jam after long jam, not to mention a bustout and a segue! I don't know that I'd seek this show up for a relisten very often, that being said. But that's really not a knock on Phish, but more of a testament to how many truly great shows there are in Phishtory.
, attached to 2016-12-29

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads A cappella song to open, as would be the trend this Run. Peaches makes a welcome return, as does Secret Smile (I really love Secret Smile.) Weekapaug must be heard to be believed; not an exceptionally long version, but extra mustard has already been broughten, nonetheless. Split Open and Melt succeeds in its goal of reinvigorating that song's jam, IMO; 3.0 versions have generally not impressed me quite as much as 1.0 or 2.0 versions. DWD opens the second set (you can see that coming nowadays, but okay) and mostly treads pre-established territory. Makisupa has a nice "Drums" segment, but it doesn't hold up that well on the recording, IMO. This is pretty much an average-great show, whether you ask me or not. :)
, attached to 2016-10-30

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads One more Thrilling, Chilling song to open! Ghost is taken for a bit of a ride, with some interesting flourishes by Trey, in particular. The now-rare How Many People Are You shows up... I'd like to hear that more often. Stashes nowadays don't seem to get quite as menacingly dark as in days of yore, but that's okay. What's that you say? DWD Set-II opener? Challenge accepted! The jam is long, but I think I prefer the segue into and jam out of BOAF more. It just seems to break fallower ground. Too bad Fuego didn't follow up with a huge jam, Harry Hood -> Have Mercy -> Harry Hood is a really nice surprise. ADITL is a fitting set-closer, I think.
, attached to 2016-10-29

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The Birds continues the 10/31/14-songs openers. Gumbo gets extended a bit, which is a nice surprise. I'm glad to hear More. Trey did a really good job in his playing in Maze. The second set has multiple highlights, namely, Mercury (not sure what they were going for in Piper but they were gonna go for it, for sure), an alternately funky and ambient Tweezer, and I Always Wanted It This Way, which sees Page doing what I've wanted him to do ever since he got the Nord Lead: use it as more than a sampler. I'm glad the new songs are being integrated comfortably and having such honorable showings.
, attached to 2014-08-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Great setlist all around, if perhaps a little songworthy. We get big jams in The Curtain With, Wolfman's, Chalkdust, and Tweezer -> Sand > Piper (the Sandpiper, if you will, for all you ornithologists out there, or just phans of the band Finch led by lead singer Troy Anastasio), though. The Chalkdust is my favorite jam of the night. It has a distinctive 3.0 flavor, if I do say so myself, in that it's more textural than it is "shreddy," and that's great! We still get to hear "shredding" from time to time. I like noticing that Joy was properly segued into; it makes me wonder if that has happened before, or since. Mike's Groove to close the second set is a great song(s) choice, IMO, and one that I would like to see more often, since Phish doesn't seem to want to put Mike's Groove in the second-set opening slot recently. I rated this show a 3/5, which just means "average-great," but if I had to rank Dick's 2014, I'd go 8/29 > 8/31 > 8/30... in other words, this is my second-favorite show of the run, and one of my favorite shows of the year. It was a very good year.
, attached to 2014-08-30

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show--arguably--doesn't have the cachet of the previous night, with its balls-to-the-wall Simple, but the DWD puts me in a mind of, like, a 2.0 jam with the edges smoothed. Carini also achieves an addictive groove at the end. Great setlist construction in the second set, especially. The .Netlist doesn't list "In a Hole," which I guess is correct, since only one chorus of it is played, but it's still a notable facet of this show. It seems like the band is having a lot of fun here, which is always the most important thing (unless they play "Wait!") ;) Jon, Ernest, Mike, and Page Awesome Show: Great Job!
, attached to 2014-08-29

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Ye olde Lushington show! I, for one, am not tired of the spelling shows. That said, the actual content of the L.U.S.H.I.N.G.T.O.N. portion of the show is well played if not necessarily above average-great, energy factor notwithstanding (I say this as someone who wasn't there and only has the LivePhish SBD.) I'm always glad to see Jen and Nat make an appearance. 46 Days is pretty groovy, but the Simple > Ghost has some of the propulsive energy that reminds me of jams like the 8/17/97 (The Great Went) Bathtub Gin, the 6/28/00 Gin, etc.; it's a feeling of transcendent purpose that pervades the listening experience, and though I think those kinds of jams are mostly precipitated by Fish's drumming, everyone has to be equally yoked or it won't have quite the same effect. The Simple in particular is one of my go-to 3.0 jams, and reminds me that "they've still got it."
, attached to 2012-09-02

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This second set is certainly stacked! But first things first (I, Poppa, freaks all the honeys.) Down with Disease is in the first set, unusually for 3.0; I think I like it better there. Sure, it's a reliable Set-II opening jam vehicle, but the song is about 23 years old (as if that has anything to do with the price of tea in China when it comes to Phish... but yeah, it does.) Anyway, the Sand reminds me of Big Cypress: not necessarily just the Sand -> Quadrophonic Toppling from 12/31/99, but just the overall jamming style most prevalent at that festival of all festivals. Legit segue into Ghost, which I believe is a noteworthy jam, legit segue into Piper, and a beatific landing pad in Twenty Years Later. When I relisten to this show, that's the segment I go for, and sometimes I don't finish the show. There's high-quality video available of the Sand on Phish's YouTube channel.
, attached to 2012-09-01

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I'll focus on the recommended jams sequence: Golden Age > Prince Caspian > Light. Golden Age is not that far out of the box, but is compelling listening, nonetheless, especially since the cover was somewhat fresh at this point. Caspian, however, is kind of a premonition--or little sibling--to the Magnaball Caspian: one of the only Type-II versions in Phishtory. Light is wide-ranging and phenomenal, progressing very logically through a series of motifs and styles. That it ends in a colossal peak is noteworthy for sure. There are other things to applaud about this show, including the Tweezer -> Fluffhead and the Mike's Groove with No Quarter as the filling. This was truly a special run, and probably my favorite Dick's run yet.
, attached to 2012-08-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The variety of jamming on display in this show astonishes me to this day (and I'd like to thank Phish for the longest Jim since--at the latest--2.0.) As we watched the webcast, it was almost as if Fall '97 had crashed the party to the delight of all, because there were actual, honest-to-goodness jams in the first set. Sure, the spelling gimmick is amazing, and the "We love Dick's" antics are funny, but the music is my passion with Phish, first and foremost, and it's remarkable how you can go from an ambient sort of bliss jam in Carini, to a peakier jam in Undermind, to a kind of combination in Jim, to pure ambience in Farmhouse (for goodness' sake!), to a coherent and thoroughly satisfying melange in Chalkdust. This is the best show 3.0 has produced, in my opinion, especially if you exclude Halloween runs and New Year's runs. It was just novel as all get-out, and I love it!
, attached to 2011-07-03

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is this phan's favorite day of Superball IX. From the Soul Shakedown opener, you had to know things were gonna be just exactly perfect. The Forbin's > Mockingbird narration is pretty trippy and phun. Wilson > Mound sees those two songs doing things they usually don't do, and Mound in particular has a coda that's pretty life-affirming. ASIHTOS has a droney, ambient jam that is--dare I say--reprised in Waves > WTU? You got your Time Loves a Hero, and Reba with the return of whistling and a segue into Bowie. Big Balls was a fun one-and-done, and No Quarter is epic. the Ghost > Jibboo > Light segment is great, and I've already mentioned the Waves. Why is this my favorite part of IX? It's just so phun to listen to.
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