Phish.net: a Project of the Mockingbird Foundation


Performances Song History Lyrics Jamming Chart

Light

Music/Lyrics: Anastasio, Marshall

Vocals: Trey (lead) Mike, Page (backing)

Original Artist: Trey Anastasio

Albums: Joy

Debut: 2009-05-31

Historian: lumpblockclod

Last Update: 2014-05-27

During one of their first writing sessions after the 2004 "breakup," Trey gave lyricist Tom Marshall some books he had recently read, including The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle. In Tolle's book the protagonist comes to the life-altering realization that he and his mind are separate entities, an epiphany that brought him great happiness. Though Tom was was not overly impressed by the book (saying "It didn't really make sense"), he was sufficiently intrigued by the concept that he used it as the basis for a song: "Light."

Lyrically “Light” seems to mesh Tolle's concept of the separateness of mind and being with references to someone emerging from a dark period in their life they would like to leave behind. Possibly a reference to Trey’s struggles with substance abuse, the lyrics poignantly balance the optimism of recovery with the uncertainty of a new lifestyle as Trey sings, “I think I’m still me / But how would you know?”

Musically, the debut of “Light” by Trey’s solo band on 8/7/08 was quite tentative, as both Trey and his band mates seemed unfamiliar with the song. “Light” made its Phish debut on 5/31/09 at Fenway Park rising out of “Tweezer.” While the Fenway version was well played, Phish seemed similarly unsure of what to do with the song, resulting in a concise reading. The next version on 6/14/09 at Bonnaroo was a more stretched out affair, but was ultimately outshone by the 500-watt performance on 8/7/09 at the Gorge. Providing one of the highlights of what many consider to be the best show of the 2009 summer tour, the jam out of “Light” developed into an airy, bouncy, almost “Hood”-like jam, compelling the band to add additional vocal accompaniment in the form of several "Ooohs" before segueing into “Taste.” Three months later, "Light" would receive its most prominent set placement to date, appearing in the middle of a "Mike's" > "2001" > "Light" > "Slave" sandwich that closed out the final set of Festival 8. Though the Festival 8 version itself drew mixed reviews (owing mainly to the space jam it spawned), few could dispute that the visual beauty of its burble accompaniment.



"Light" 11/1/09 Indio, CA

After being played sporadically in the first half of 2009, "Light" made five appearances on the 13 show 2009 Fall Tour (including four appearances in the coveted early, second set position), and quickly became one of Phish's most reliable improvisational vehicles. While 11/29/0912/2/09 and 12/5/09 all feature strong renditions, the 12/2/09 version from Madison Square Garden shines the brightest.  



"Light" 12/2/09 New York, NY (Part 1)



"Light" 12/2/09 New York, NY (Part 2)

"Light" continued to shine brightly in 2010. All five versions from the early summer tour were well-played with 6/22/10 (absolutely thrilling before being cut off prematurely by "46 Days") and 7/1/10 (featuring a rare return to the lyrics) topping the list. Both were overshadowed, though, by the 8/7/10 "Light" which included a jam that would have been completely at home in a mid-'90s version of "Bowie." Fall 2010 versions tended towards sparser, more percussive journeys (see 10/19/10 and 10/26/10). The 10/26/10 version, in particular (from a show that contains an embarrassment of riches), stands out as the most interesting of the bunch. Though 2011 was, oddly, a comparatively unadventurous year for "Light," the 8/9/11 version that emerged from the depths of nearby Lake Tahoe is a true monster and should not be missed. Both 7/3/11 and 8/15/11 also contain a few twists and turns and are worth seeking out.  



"Light" 8/9/11 Stateline, NV

After a relatively dim 2011, “Light” is shining much brighter in 2012. The renditions from 6/16/12 and 6/23/12 are not only among the best the band has played, but among the best jams from what many consider one of Phish’s strongest tours of the 3.0 era. The 6/16/12 version from Bader Field weaves in and out of “Manteca” and is infused with “Crosseyed and Painless” quotes before building to a glorious peak. The 6/23/12 Star Lake version featured a jam that ran the gamut from themes that recalled the SBIX “Storage Jam” to bouncy, melodic playing. The second leg of the tour featured 1.21 gigawatt versions on 8/19/12 (building to a furious peak before segueing into “Sally”) and 9/1/12 (culminating in what can only be described as among the most magnificent jams Phish has ever performed).

While some have argued that 2013 marked a significant step forward for the band, it would be hard to say the same with respect to “Light.”  Happily, that is more of a testament to the power of the 2012 renditions than an indictment of those from 2013. Strong 2013 versions include 7/5/13 SPAC (takes a while to lift off, but when it does… BLISS), 7/14/13 Merriweather (with a start/stop proto-”Woo!” jam) and 8/4/13 BGCA (sticks to the “Light” theme, but does so with authority). Phish saved the best “Light” of 2013 for last. Coming off the heels of the post-”Auld Lang Syne” > “Fuego” combo, the 12/31/13 calypso-infused “Light” set a high bar for 2014 versions.

Finally, any discussion of “Light” would be incomplete without mentioning the studio version that many consider to be the highlight of Joy, featuring Mike channeling John Entwistle, in providing some meaty, beaty, big and bouncy bass runs.



”Light” 9/1/12 Commerce City, CO

Submit notes/corrections

Recommended Versions: 2009-08-07, 2009-12-02, 2010-08-07, 2010-10-26, 2011-08-09, 2012-08-19, 2012-09-01, 2013-07-14

You must be logged in to leave a comment!

Username

Password




Register | Forgot Password

Guelah34 Reply
Guelah34 Light> Sally from 8/19/12 is a must hear!
Score: 4
phishfan60 Reply
I am not as technical some people on this site but for me the 9.1.2012 version of Light (along with Golden Age, Prince Caspian and Boogie) is the best 45 minutes of music I have heard.
Score: 2
jpendak Reply
The Super Ball version may be the "1.21 gigawatt performance" that lumpblockclod predicted!
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2009-08-07 George, WA

Light, Number 3


Placement: 2nd song, 2nd set
Preceded by: MOMA Dance


Jam begins at 3:46. Standard soloing from Trey, although he does seem to change tones early, which conveniently leads back into the refrain. The second dive into the jam is a bit more unique. Still the same theme, but the pitch is lower and feels as if it could change into something original at any time. At 5:30 Fish pushes hard mixing the rhythm and soloing on the snare. Trey follows with a catchy repeating pattern, but they slowly form back into a version of the main theme. Page picks up on the repetition briefly, but instead moves off of it as Trey pitch shifts his way into a more mundane segment ... At 8:11 the entire band transitions into a new jam rhythm but Trey seems out of sync with the overall direction. It is a perfect example of Trey's inability to follow his band mates into deeper waters. Page, Mike and Fish are all on the edge of something quite interesting but pulling Trey with them is almost impossible. In fact, it seems that most of them come back to meet Trey. Frustrating to dissect. Finally at 10:11 Trey begins a new melody that locks in with the entire band. By 10:57 Page hops on the organ and the four settle in on a calypso jam, topped off with a subtle island vocal harmony. This calypso jam will become a staple of where the song progresses, but the introduction of their "fifth instrument" pushes this version into an amazing space. The end of this jam is bittersweet because it eventually morphed into something spectacular.

This is in someways a perfect example of the volatility of jams in 3.0. Trey seems to hold back his band mates, but once all four connect an amazing jam happens quickly. Tough to rate.
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-08-05 Raleigh NC

Light, Number 8


Placement: 2nd song, 2nd set
Preceded by: Golgi Apparatus


Coming out of Golgi, this version immediately has an energy and pace that feels quickened and upbeat. Jam begins at 2:57. Trey sounds focused and driven through his opening solo. Standard, but in no way "noodley" or boring until 5:25 when Trey amps the progressions into something much more ear-catching. At 6:00 Trey finally abandons the intro jam and the mood darkens quickly towards some heavy riffing at 6:30. Page on the clav and Mike balance and drive the change in mood. Continuing in this fashion until the 8 minute mark, the jam lacks any direction. At 8:30 we hear a third distinct shift, led by Fish's move from heavy tom beats to lighter snare/cymbal work Trey begins a lighter more floating tone with Page back on piano to follow. Sharper notes and heavier drums begin around 10:30 pushing back to more of a straight up rocker. This jam builds to 12:00 with a couple big rock chords from Trey. Page heads back to the clav and things get a bit funkier. Mike's runs at 13:00 sound great with Trey over the top in more big rock fashion. As things begin to fade, at 14:00 Mike adds some envelope and he takes the lead with a nice variant to the previous segment. Trey comes back at 15:26 with his best melody of the jam, working to build a nice layer over the groove. Oh, must be time to end this jam, because here comes Page with the synth-washout (Seriously, it's like Page's talkback mic)! Mike drives on with some final crazy groove as they fade down and end the song.

Really, really nice version with outstanding playing from all four. Jams in 2010 have more bite, but this one is quite nice.
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-08-05 Raleigh NC

Light, Number 16


Placement: 3rd song, 2nd set
Preceded by: Halley's Comet


Jam begins at 3:03. Someday I'm gonna think of a witty way to describe how ordinary the opening to this jam can be. Around 5:08 you can hear Mike start to drone a new beat and Trey follows suit focusing more on arpeggios than bent ugliness. At 6:54 he hits a couple of peak notes and the jam has its first feeling of significance. At 7:33 Trey fades with an echo and Mike, Fish and Page push direction. It's a nice break and indicative of the changes we will see Trey make in his playing over the next 6 months. When he returns, Trey is playing a quiet melody that is more soundscape than true melody. At 8:45 he unleashes a massive echo that layers with the patterns he's keyed in on. This pattern will remain pervasive throughout the jam over the next 3 minutes. If anyone can identify if this melody is similar to another, please let me know...it sounds very familiar.

The interesting thing here is not the jam, but the style and Trey's function in the jam. He and Page push the dissonance over the final 5 minutes, but it has the staccato feel to it that we will rave about over the 12/2010 tour.

In this incarnation, it's much dirtier and raw...certainly not pretty like you will hear in December. But the connection is there, at least in my ears, and I appreciate it as a marker in style. They push the pattern and the dissonance until 12:15 when they come back into the refrain and close out the song with the final chorus.

This is tough to measure. By itself, I'm inclined to say it's below average, but when you look at the jam in two parts and contrast of the first half as a "whale driven note bending noddle fest" with the second half "staccato'd dissonant" jam it's almost as if we are witnessing the death of the whale call. When the band returns in Berkeley in August we slowly see the removal of the pitch shifting until December where it is almost non existent. Now, I'm probably projecting what I know now onto a moment here that's wildly exaggerated and presumptuous to say the least. Nevertheless, it's interesting to at least hear it and determine if it's valid or wild bullshit created in my mind. Average version, that's worth listening to. I'd love to hear thoughts on this.
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-08-05 Berkeley CA

Light, Number 19


Placement: 2nd song, 2nd set
Preceded by: Wilson


Jam begins at 3:08. Standard jam opening with a long hold to start from Trey. Despite the sign imploring Trey to stop the technique he whale calls his way through the initial segment. Mike and Fish push the rhythm through a varied section that feels decidedly different. When Trey begins to follow their lead, Fish is almost back with Page in the standard melody. By 7:07 everyone is off script and diving further into the improv. Trey leads a big climb upwards with Page while Mike spirals down, it's a very cool effect. Page is on the organ at 8:15 and is much more present in this jam than in others. At 8:30 Page stops the organ and the jam gets much quiter. Trey stays very synthy until 9:20 when he fades out. His return provides a stacatto melody while Mike turns on the envelope for texture. The slow pace at 10:10 begins to quicken just slightly and the jam has become very melodic and pretty. Subtle loops careen as Page begins to bend chords increasing texture. At 12:00 Mike and Trey begin a call and response playing with Trey's melodies. As the jam continues Page almost plays the role of Trey's loop pedal, it's much better than his normal washout technique. Around 13:30 we hear Trey briefly tease the melody from Blondie's "Dreaming." At 13:50 we slow back down into another quiet segment. Trey's melody has hints of Harpua and at 14:21 you can hear Trey start shifting to the next song. 14:47 and Trey begins riffing a little with following his lead. Timber-esque vibe begins to fill and push the final segment of the jam. At 16:00 Trey begins to push a more defined melody as the jam transforms yet again. Amazing ebb and flow throughout, quite dynamic. The beat slows and fades and the band transitions into Twenty Years Later.

Fantastic version. Well above average.
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-08-13 Noblesville IN

Light, Number 18


Placement: 2nd song, 2nd set
Preceded by: Halley's Comet


Jam begins at 2:50. Trey has purpose with his initial notes as he builds the standard jam opening. He sounds crisp and isn't unnecessarily bending notes for effect. Pace is quick and feels purposeful. A bit of a messy segment around 4:40 as Trey changes styles but recovers quickly. At 5:00 we're into the spiraling progression that I just can't stand. Trey and Mike sound out of tune from one another and Fish loses rhythm momentarily. Stop doing this. The promise of the first few minutes wanes until Mike begins a drone at 6:10. Trey is quick to the party but mostly noodles in an unpleasing fashion. At 7:21 Trey plays a powerful chord that finally has some balls. His tone immediately shifts into something that sounds like a real guitar should. Fish is quiet and I haven;t heard Page at all for the entire thing. That can't be good. I can actually hear him now as he provides a layer beneath. At 8:45 the jam dissolves and Trey takes a break. Mike and Page create melody in the spaces between and the result is enjoyable. Trey comes back with a pretty progression as we head towards a new major jam. A delicate loop provides background to Page's synth and Fish on the toms. 10:25 and Trey begins the refrain.

The last 3 minutes show promise but as a full version it leaves a lot to be desired.

Average.
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-06-11 Chicago IL

Light, Number 11


Placement: 1st song, 2nd set
Preceded by: (none)

Jam begins at 3:28. Standard opening as Trey bends notes around in uninspired fashion. At 5:10 Mike takes the opportunity to shift the melody and Fish follows on the rhythm side. Page introduces a bloder sound on the piano but Trey is trapped in Boresville USA (Population, 1). By 6:20 we are right back in the main theme. At 6:55 Trey makes his first move out of constant repetition, but even this is short lived. Page comes back in on both the piano and synthesizer as Mike pushes hard to change the melody. Extremely frustrating to listen to. It is messy and terribly executed. At 8:30 Trey and Page tease the refrain vocals. The addition of this element actually helps to center the jam as the fading vocals match the dissonant feel. 9:25 and Mike is clearly in the lead with Page providing the melody, slowly the jam is transitioning into something of note. 10:30 Trey begins using the tremolo and echo to work with Page on the synth, dissonant melody meanders up and down. At 11:15 Trey plays the first genuinely crisp notes of the last 8 minutes. Mike begins a droning bass beat and Fish rises in tempo and deliberateness. 12:00 Trey is almost riffing for the first time, he plays what could becoming a driving chord but abandons for more noodling. 12:50 the riff comes back, but the energy fades into a washed out segue.

Upon first listen, I remember thinking this was a decent jam. But, 6 months later I can't see how. Very little uniqueness from Trey.

Below average.
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-10-26 Manchester NH

Light, Number 23


Placement: 2nd song, 2nd set
Preceded by: Possum


For some reason Mike sounds more lively in the into here, very Entwistle. Probably nothing to it, but something I immediately thought. Trey doesn’t push the vocal modulations and everything sounds nice. Jam begins at 3:00. Start is innocent enough with the normal noodling from Trey. Page sounds delicate and has found his way forward quickly. At 4:55 Trey and Mike begin to push off course with some runs shifting into new territory. By 5:35 Trey finishes a build and Page comes over the top with heavy repetition and Trey responds with a turn of his own. 6:20 in and you can still main theme pushing back in from Mike and Fish but the whole jam feels different. Trey relaxes at 7:00 and begins a series of stacatto’d notes and the rhythm falls off the original path. Jam turns quiet with Trey in the background as Mike takes the first chair. By 8:20 the loops that Trey is building begin to take shape and Mike is in a dirty way. This is normally where the whole thing goes to shit. Trey starts noodling around playing interspersed notes, but tonight it is actually holding together. Halleluiah! Fish hits the cowbell just before 10:00 minutes and it’s fucking on! Trey comes out of the noodle hole and starts with some dirty riffs bringing us back into a straight up rocker. Fish holds steady on the cowbell and we dive head first in to a funky bluesy progression. Trey is holding on to all the riffs in that elbow out, let’s dig this in kind way. By 12:00 Fish is the center of the rhythm on the cowbell and Trey pushes out a couple echoes and the jam goes back into a 97-esque funk. 13:10 and the jam begins to untangle as in most 3.0 transitions with Page playing a few washes, Trey fading and then starting the next songs opening…Mike’s Song. Nothing markedly different in style from the most recent attempt in Providence, but the cohesiveness and Trey's ability to not significantly fuck the song into a mindless wander help this version immensely.

Above average

* was in attendance
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2009-12-28 Miami FL

Light, Number 10

Placement: 2nd song, 2nd set
Preceded by: Mike's Song

Jam begins at 3:20, Mike and Fish keep the beat from the opening segment as Trey bends notes in the standard jam opening fashion. Fish’s drums drive the opening jam until 5:45 when Page hops to the organ and Trey chirps out some staccato notes to shift the rhythm. At 6:15 Page creates a wash and layers gentle piano behind, Trey follows some delicate notes but ultimately bends his sound to match the feel. By 7:15 the organ is the most prevalent sound as Page bends the sound up and down. Mike and Fish provide rhythm, but overall the jam has degraded into four sounds following the same beat, but not much more. At 8:30 Mike takes control with a quickening beat that begins to define a more cohesive segment, but Trey is just noodling through more staccato notes. By 9:40 Trey has abandoned the riffing and the band finally begins to come back together as Fish makes his way to the cowbell. A couple of ugly turns on the whammy and the band drives into a much better time signature with a quickened pace driving back towards the main theme. Without finishing the song, they fade into Hydrogen.

Another example of a Light where individually there are some moments, but they are extremely short lived. On the whole, this version sees uninspired efforts from all four band members.

Below average.
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-10-22 Providence RI

Light, Number 24*


Placement: 8th song, 2nd set
Preceded by: Suzy Greenberg


Preface: This is easily my least favorite version of Light in its brief history. Continue on at your own risk ;)

Trey's vocals feel off tempo and awkward from the start. He focuses on modulating the chorus more than he has previously and a couple of them sound quite nice, but mostly it just cracks. I still like the potential of the variation. Trey's first notes in the solo are muddy, poorly executed and he fades quickly back in the structure. Page is very prominent in the initial jam segment with Mike easing in. Around 5:15 there's the beginning of an interesting rhythm as Mike drones a beat out. Page works very gingerly to create a nice background layer and then Trey flattens out and just dives into this over-modulated walkabout with zero direction. The entire band is out of sync by 7:00 and sounds terrible. Finally, Trey begins to find a riff that amounts to something as Mike and Fish just play a basic rhythm, but that is quickly abandoned for another try. Sounds like the classic lack of leadership issue. I keep hoping Fish will do something to drive direction but it's not happening. 8:45, Mike is getting a little creative but Trey is still off in la-la land. At 10:00 a dark groove finally appears that has some structure, but it is short lived. Even the segue into the refrain is awful as Page and Trey are on different tempos. Thank god we finish with a feedback loop to cement how awful this was. The intro that follows for Character Zero is even worse. An otherwise inspired second set in Providence on this evening comes crashing down in these 15 minutes.

Terrible. Continuing on, 2 minutes into Zero Fish shouts "Oh yeah!"¯, almost as if he knows how terrible it is and maybe he can hide it from us. Trey does manage to get his shit together and play a pretty ripping zero solo in the end. Clearly that's what he's wanted to do for the last 15 minutes.

*was in attendance
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-10-19 Augusta ME

Light, Number 23*


Placement: 3rd song, 2nd set
Preceded by: Mike's Song


Jam begins at 3:00, Trey played with changing keys in his vocals again, but not as pronounced as in other Fall 2010 version. Trey begins the jam with purpose, nicely defined notes as Page begins to fill behind him. Jam quickly turns away from the bright fill and Page brings in the organ around 5:15. We progress darker while Mike and Fish begin to drive the blossoming rhythm. At 6:20 we find the apex of the darkness with Trey and Mike patterning but are quickly whisked back into a more defined melody. At 7:25 Trey shifts tone and a new jam begins, hints of Timber create a blusey feel and Page begins to take lead on the clav. Funky. Mike, Fish and Trey all settle in on a the rhythm behind Page until at 9:00 the beginnings of an ambient segment begin. Staccato notes layer over a wash from Page. At 10:00 Mike shifts to a more deliberate beat and Trey's almost in a calypso feel which Page picks up on immediately. Fourth style of the song. At 11:40 we begin the shift into a full-on ambient feel. Repetitive rhythm has an almost "delay loop" feel, without the actual use of it's namesake. Around 12:55 the rhythm fades almost entirely and Trey comes back in with a new tone. Eventually the ambient was quickly transforms into Twenty Years Later. The jam inside of Twenty Years is equally impressive.

Well above average version. Maybe best of Fall 2010. Shifts between tempo and style highlight this must hear version.

* was in attendance
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-08-18, Hartford CT

Light, Number 18*


Placement: 3rd song, 2nd Set
Preceded by: Light


After sloppy versions of both Axilla and Timber, the band launches into Light. Jam begins at 3:24. Trey quickly begins to flutter around while left-turn Mike just plays something completely unique.

(Note: Someday I'm gonna compare all of the bass lines Mike uses once Trey starts the solo. I'm betting very few are similar)

At 5:30 Trey unleashes the first lick that really begins to change the dynamic. 6:15 the evolving jam is very Timber-esque, they could probably go back into it if they wanted. 6:50 Trey drives further downward until Mike begins what I'm going to start referring to as "the deathmarch". An ominous alternating between notes that sounds like a belltower before something bad happens. We're all the way up to 8:00 minutes now and Trey has completely shifted tone into a beeping/synthesized sound. (It should be noted that I haven;t listened to or heard Page at all thus far.) All Mike and Trey.

9:30 Trey pulls a little loop and takes a break, the sound quiets and I can finally hear Page. 10:15 Mike comes back in with another groove - man can he play. 11:15 is DEG-esque from Mike if not an actual quote, it's similar and Trey follows it up with a pattern of his own. This is great stuff. Page fills behind with more of the Pink Floyd echoes treatment that he has been playing with. At 12:00 the best part of the song happens when Fish begins playing the opening drum part to Seven Below. Very cool, he hangs with it for almost a minute as the other three play around with their version of synthnoise . It really would have been a cool segue, but I guess Trey wasn't listening or didn't feel it. Instead at 13:35, he comes in over the top of everyone and starts 46 days. I like the transition but Fish dropping Seven Below underneath everyone gets more cred.

The 46 Days that follows is energy packed. Stick around for this one.

Above average. Maybe the best of the second leg.

* was in attendance
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2009-11-27, Albany NY

Light, Number 6*


Placement: Closer, 1st Set
Preceded by: Cavern


Anytime a set continues beyond a version of Cavern is a good thing. After the band hits the stinger, everyone was ready to head for the aisles. Trey had other plans and quickly shifted into the opening chords for Light before the notes of Cavern faded. A real nice treat.

Jam begins at 3:10. Trey lingers with the rest of the band in the structure of the opening solo for the next minute or so. Between 4:30 and 5:00 Mike and Trey begin to increase the pace of the notes and while still in the main jam Trey and Mike have some nice interplay, but nothing that shifts direction.

At 5:50 Trey heads directly back into the chorus. At 6:20 Page moves down the scale into the beginnings of some dissonant notes and Trey follows suit building echoes and feedback for a wall of sound. Fish lightly taps the cymbals and around 7:00 Trey adds a screeching echo as Page moves onto the organ until there's nothing left but noise. At 8:20 Fish pick backs up the main drum beat under everything for a very cool effect. At 9:04 the band fades to only a single loop to be cut off before the band leaves the stage.

Overall a version that is finished but feels totally unfinished in a completely odd way. Setbreak killed this one and ultimately I wish they had saved the song for second set. The dissonance at the end is a very cool moment once Fish picks back up the beat.

Average, considering the timing.

* was in attendance
Score: 1
ericwyman Phish.net Staff Reply
ericwyman 2010-06-18, Hartford CT

Light, Number 12*


Placement: 2nd song, 2nd Set
Preceded by: Halley's Comet


An abrupt end to Halley's Comet and the opening chords to Light begin. Jam begins at 2:53. Trey is heavy on the pitch shift for the first minute, alternating between firing and pitching. Around 4:30 Fish seems to signal the opportunity to slow the jam. Mike slowly follows down pace as Trey lingers in the murky tone established in the earlier portion. Page provides a deeper layer using the piano and a synthesizer together (see 6:50) to provide a contrast to Trey's general noodling. At 7:30 Trey goes through some quick progressions and settles in on a riff as Page moves completely to the synthesizer providing the beginnings of a wash. By 8:30 Fish and Mike have slowed considerably. At 9:00 Fish has faded into almost nothing and Page is into the heavy synthesizer wash, bending the notes up and down until they begin to spin. At 9:30 Trey has faded and only Page and Mike remain. At 9:52 the opening notes of Billy Breathes are heard in a beautiful transition.

Overall, a messy jam that has no focal point. Trey seems to play with his 2010 style throughout and never finds a riff or a groove to progress on. Page provides nice layering in the background.

Below average.

* was in attendance
Score: 1
Ouish Reply
Ouish Fishman on backing vocals too, right?
Score: 0
Ravinus Reply
Now that I think of it, I remember the 12/5/09 Light being pretty good too. I think that may have been the first one that I saw after hearing the Joy version.
Score: 0
Ravinus Reply
I was at the Star Lake show from 2012 and the entire show was fantastic. The Light melted my face. The Merriweather Light this summer was great too, but I really dug the one from last summer in Pittsburgh.
Score: 0
MDosque Reply
MDosque I have been lucky enough to see two of the top few ever - Bader and MPP 13. I have officially let go of the dim but still there jaded vet in me that is slightly bummed when Light starts up. I know that the band uses it as a conduit to deep serious jamming. I'm still not crazy about the actual composed part, but it is growing on me. Definitely a jam vehicle.
Score: 0
UncleGus Reply
UncleGus That’s cool. Thank you. I loved The Power of Now even though I remain a novice in its teachings. The crux I took away from it was more about removing unnecessary and toxic thoughts from your current state of being; like a bodhisattva does during meditation, or pretty much always. I actually was pondering that practice this morning as I was wishing I was going to Dick’s instead of where I’m at right now.
Anyways, it’s not too difficult to see the “Light” was inspired by an epiphany. Wow did I feel it at MPP 2 this year. It was for me, what Maslow described as, a peak experience. So perhaps my mind will be at Dick’s this weekend while my body is stuck at this dumb ass fair in Jersey. Not so bad.
Score: 0
TheFuckinBook_Man Reply
TheFuckinBook_Man Fortunately...you were wrong! "A song of light in the dick of flight"
Score: 0
dscott Reply
Totally different take on 10/22/10: Where PYITE hears a mess, I hear a richness of free-wheeling improv. While the instruments are on different pages for much of the jam, to my ears it holds together nicely as a polyrhythmic, polymelodic foray into something different. It's not my favorite Light jam, but it's not a bad listen either.
Score: 0
mikeyzen Reply
Listening to 8/9/11 now. Would this be considered a Type II Jam? I;m pretty new to some of these terms ;)
Score: 0
Login Register