, attached to 1997-08-17

Review by Philbombs77

Philbombs77 Just out of curiosity, what happened to the "headphones" for this show? This is the greatest second set Phish has ever played with a Top 5 Disease, Top 2 Gin, Top 5 2001, and Top 10 Hood. Not to mention the sick SOAMule->DDLJ->SOAMule in the third set. Now that I have that out of the way, I want to weigh in on the not-so-new Phish.net format. I refused to unleash my frustration at the time that the change was made (I believe it was something like last August or September). As a rule of thumb, everybody hates webpage revamps. The ensuing changes to the aesthetic of my favorite website cleaved very closely to this rule. But there have been other webpage revamps that grew on me - some pretty quickly (Slate, Deadspin) and others more slowly (NYTimes). But Phish.net shares the following ignominious honor with Archive.org: both sites were sheer perfection in simplicity, aesthetic appeal, and navigability. And by the superfluous need to constantly "update the look" and tamper with a layout that required no tampering, I am now loath to visit either one of them. Of course I do...how would I be writing this otherwise? But instead of checking out Phish.net once every day for a few minutes, I now take the same amount of time once every 1-2 weeks. The following is a list of the main reasons I hate the new look for Phish.net (I don't have the will, at least not today, to get into the ancillary details): 1. I loved the old setlist format and fonts. It was riveting to explore Phish's setlists and come upon a show like this one (08/17/97), or 11/16/95, or 04/03/98 and see tons of songs in bold green lettering or highlighted in a perfect yellow hue. It let me know that this show had to be listened to at all costs. At one point, they put "quintessential" versions, like the 12/29/95 Gin->Real Me->Gin and the 11/12/94 Hood in bold red as to say "If you don't listen to this version, you're missing out on true ecstasy!" I fucking loved that shit, but of course it was nixed about 2 weeks after it started. There's the seemingly eternal quest to make the copy on each page "clean" and effortless to read. Hence, the headphones. The headphones did not break up the text or call attention to any given song because they were, like the font color of every single song, completely black. Does this make the text "flow" better? Sure. But flow is something we seek when listening to the music, not perusing setlists. I would argue that people loved and very much miss the disjointed nature of the old format when looking at setlists like 12/31/99, 12/31/95, 11/27/98, or 08/13/93 from a purely chromatic and entropic standpoint....haphazard made me happy! 2. Why are the setlist years now scrolling from NYE down to the first show of the year? There's no fuckin' reason for changing that up. It's like you start with some sort of NYE show and scroll back in time when it's far more logical to scroll forward in time and end on NYE. Who wants to check out the amazing shows from November and October '94, only to see some fizzled, light-weight material from April '94 at the end. Speaking of, this site is so currently fucked up (02/25 @ 23:43 MST), it doesn't list anything from before the Bomb Factory show in 1994. WTF is going on? 3. I know this whole web redesign was supposed coincide with the new Phish Companion and the font, setlists, etc... are the same. But that makes me less likely to BUY THE BOOK. Of course, the essays and photos are the real reason Phans bought TPC3. But it didn't have to align with the website and we still would have bought it. 4. There's no heart or passion in this redesign. It seems like a kitchen with 1 chef, 2 sous chefs, 4 line cooks, the owner, and the owner's girlfriend all pushing for their paradigm of soup. Eventually, the most anthemic parts of the soup are watered down and, at the behest of the owner's gf, they add the most banal veggies and spices to make it appealing to the largest, dullest possible audience. In order to please multiple people, too many compromises were made and we get this vapid, uninspired revamp. I still have some screen grabs I took in the early and mid-'00s of shows that I hadn't yet explored and wanted desperately to get my hands (ears) on. I had no idea how much I would cherish them now that I have to put up with this drivel. I waited a good 6 months before imparting Phish.net's community with my opinion on the matter. I waited and did everything I could to Let It Grow on me (wrong band, I know). But it hasn't. Nobody outside of this community, Deadheads, Spraedheads, Cheeseheads, and (it's weird, but true) Bruce Springsteen fans understand how riveting it can truly be to flip through setlists and see what was played on a given night and what the band played the shit out of on other nights. I imagine I haven't been the only one nearly hypnotized as I scrolled through August '93, December '95, and all of Fall '97. I know we live in a great fucking world when I sit down and spend 30 minutes to write a harangue about the insipid visual quality of the new Phish.net site. But I have a feeling that, despite the paucity of comment-section caviling or outright oppositional exegeses on this matter, a lot of people agree with me. And I also needed to add my two cents...it feels good to vent. Thanks for listening.
, attached to 2016-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show is second only to 2010's Little Feat costume in being my least-favorite musical costumes, but I would much rather hear something like Ziggy Stardust than Waiting for Columbus, especially since Zigs includes the strings and acoustic guitar. I have only listened to this show twice, so I can't really give you the droids you're looking for if you want the skinny on it, but I have a right to my entirely subjective opinion and it is that while it's a treat to see a traditional musical costume again after the Wingsuit set and the Chilling Thrilling set, both of those sets were more interesting to me first musically and second for their novelty. Phish didn't even really improvise that much in this Bowie set. The fact that this show capped a hugely entertaining four-show Vegas run and occurred in a great year of Phishtory is more reason for me to be somewhat spoiled to have expected, well, more (no pun intended on the title of that other song.) I am, however, vibrating with love and light and pulsating with love and light with anticipation for this year's Baker's Dozen, and Mexico this year was excellent, so... your head can be any place you let it get to, but just keep taking it everywhere with you and you'll find a pebble in dust.
, attached to 2014-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Boy, was this a spectacle! The kind heretofore reserved for New Year's Eve, I might venture to say, and perhaps exceeding some of those "stunts." I was totally transfixed by the Disney sound-effect songs in the second set, though they have not--to me--weathered as well as the Fuego (née Wingsuit) album material from the previous year's Halloween. Lots of phans seem to really get off on the sound-effect songs, though, so what do I know? An unfortunate similarity between that year's songs and 2014's songs is that with the exception of Fuego, none have seemed to been jammed out extensively. I want Phish to be interested in jamming... not at the expense of their songwriting vocations, but isn't the unknown what we all seek in the Phish experience? Don't we want to be surprised? I've never heard anyone come away from a show saying, "Man, I'm so glad that show was just like the last show I saw," unless they were speaking generally about how awesome both shows were in their respective merits. To be entirely fair, Phish does still jam, and I love them for many reasons. But God, it would be awesome to see a huge version of one of these Disney songs, or many over a tour or any amount of time. The Sand in the third set is certainly worth hearing, too, since I kind of glossed over anything but the costume. Shit, Phish can do anything they want. I just wanna hear it.
, attached to 2013-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I'm reviewing this show by memory from the webcast, and I was simultaneously disappointed that there'd be no Eat a Peach costume and happy that we were getting a full album's worth of new songs, when the Phishbill was circulated. My fears proved to be baseless, as this second set was absolutely fabulous and really kicked me into gear to get ready for the next year or so of Phish. I instantly found a favorite in Fuego, and it would prove to produce several huge jamming versions in future. Reading the Phishbill and its description of the very group-oriented songwriting process, I was fascinated to hear these tunes debuted. I could go for more of them being jammed out--and for any return at all of Snow, Admist the Peals of Laughter, or You Never Know, the latter of which I am not alone in clamoring for--but the main point of this show for me was to prove that Phish was not a nostalgia act, and that their new material could be as strongly affecting as their old, given time and open minds.
, attached to 2010-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I have never been less excited about a musical costume than this one. I've read Mike is a huge Little Feat fan, and that's great for what it's worth; if he needed Phish to do this for whatever reason, I support it. No one's putting a salmon to my head and making me listen to this show on repeat forever (though the first and third sets do offer some tasty courses.) The first four songs in the first set seem to have a bit of thematic Halloween continuity, and I like the song choice in the third set. I'll have to relisten to this Julius to see what's highly recommended about it (probably the percussion and horns.) I'm working my way through reviewing all the musical costumes, and I think I have to rate '94 highest for best overall show and '98 highest for being an amazing show as well as my personal favorite costume top to bottom. 2010 was a good year for Phish, but a kind of transitional one, in my opinion, and this Halloween show as well as the fact that they didn't do another one until 2013 and then they covered their own as-yet-unreleased album support that thesis, if one were to speculate.
, attached to 2009-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I'm much more of a Beatles fan than a Stones fan, but like Halloweens '95, '96, '98, and possibly '10, I have the musical costume of this show to thank for giving me motivation to learn more about the covered band. My Dad used to have Hot Rocks on eight-track, and I enjoyed the singles from the Rolling Stones but didn't give much credence otherwise to their albums at all until after hearing this show. As I said, it was pretty much that way with The Who, Talking Heads, The Velvet Underground, and Little Feat--respectively--as well. Now, after hearing Phish cover it, Exile on Main St is my favorite Stones album, and the one I'm most familiar with. Just as an aside, if Phish is going to keep doing musical costumes for Halloween--and I hope they do!--I could go for some more modern selections. Remain in Light was from the 1980s, but I'm left scratching my head when I think of what Phish could do with more recent material to cover and their choice not to. Mike Gordon Band does a good job of keeping the covers interesting, but for the most part, I'm not most enthusiastic about Phish's covers, but rather their originals, so does it matter? Who knows, man... who effing knows!
, attached to 1998-11-02

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show has already been pretty thoroughly and capably reviewed, but I would like to express my own unique enthusiasm for it. I have somewhat of a self-conferred identity as a preferrer of soundboards, but I will listen to the audience recording of this until the wheels fall off or a soundboard is released--and maybe after--because as with some extremely special shows, the audience is a big part of this one. The sheer, unreserved delight expressed by the crowd throughout this show but especially during the Pink Floyd musical costume is worth hearing by any means necessary. If you're like me and you love to hear an organic and fitting response to the grandeur of a Phish gesture--though I'm by no means belittling the effort it took to pull this show off, by calling it a "gesture"--this and 8/9/98 are where you should be headed. We do have the 8/9/98 Terrapin Station in SBD quality from the Lemonwheel From the Archives show, thanks to Phish archivist Kevin Shapiro, and I hope that some day [i]this[/i] historic moment will be captured in similar quality.
, attached to 1995-06-26

Review by pmc2kd

pmc2kd The new LivePhish release is GREAT. Set I doesn't necessarily have Big (read:long) jams (outside Possum), but it's very well played, with great song selection, and plenty of quality jamming within the confines of song structure. MFMF is a wonderful way to open the show (and foreshadows the psychedelic set II nicely). Great spacey ending section. Don't You Want to Go? is a nice peppy cover. Has a rocking and rollicking jam and the band does a nice job indeed. Bathtub Gin sits in the 3-hole. This is a relatively short version at around 9 minutes, but carries a pretty nice jam without breaking too much ground or peaking too hard. NICU is up next and is another fun tune and fits the preceding couple of song choices nicely. Good danceable stretch. The Sloth is always a fine one to hear. This is a good rocking version and brings back a bit of an edge to the set. My Mind's Got a Mind of Its Own is fun, but to me felt like a bit of an oddly placed song. It's Ice>Dog Faced Boy>Tela is a really cool stretch of songs, with good playing in Ice, a delicate Dog Faced Boy, and a very pretty version of Tela. (Tela & Sloth in same set...awesome!) Possum is the biggest jam of the first set and it is indeed a barn burner. This one is long and pretty open. Has a nice heavy jam in the middle and an absolutely explosive peak. Phenomenal closer. Set II opens with Down With Disease. The opening itself contains a slightly prolonged bit of space, a bit different from today's unrecognizable bubbling bass. Pretty cool. The song itself is played very crisply & the solo is glorious. The jam quickly moves to rhythmic territory. This is '95 at it's finest, glorious open improv, mind-blowing complexity, challenging, but cohesive. Not for the faint of heart, but most certainly satisfying. I felt like this jam went by far quicker than the timing indicated and was also cohesive in the context of some of the long and more challenging Tweezers of '95. It's sublime stuff. The -> into Free is very smooth, executed with some tactfulness (patience) which would develop into the glorious segues found on the back end of the 90's. It's a great, smooth drop-in & the first ever pairing of these tunes. I often lament how much I got these paired in 3.0, but it definitely works here. The Free itself might be my favorite jam of the show. It's amazing improv, with a minimalist, rhythmic, psychedelic section, which deconstructs then rebuilds to a glorious up tempo peaking conclusion. Is this my new favorite version? Asking that question alone is enough of a win. Poor Heart does not allow us to cleanse our palette with a breather quite yet and is plenty fun. YEM (in it's best ever year?) pops up and continues to carry this monster of a set. This is a excellent version (not December '95 exploratory/long) that has an incredible peaking solo (around 14:45 or so) where Trey is just on fire. The whole tune is executed very well. The vocal jam is also plenty wild. Strange Design is the well earned breather and fits the penultimate song slot like a glove. Very choice. Run Like An Antelope charges with abandon in this straight ahead, but nonetheless scorched earth version. It's a truly relentless jam concluding a pretty relentless set. There's a great moment of long sustain in the 6 minute mark. The playing around 7:50 or so is also very tasty and commences a relentless build to the stratosphere. Sleeping Monkey and Rocky Top end the show in a more comical fashion, reminding us that Phish still brings the laughs after some pretty amazing & challenging music. You can't rightfully complain about anything in Set II other than you might have needed another breather or a water bottle to keep up with the pace of that set. Fire front to back and pretty much a perfect set. Great choice LP. 5/5
, attached to 1996-10-21

Review by casperphish

casperphish Very vivid memories of this show. Drove down from Albany right after a full day of teaching band at my school. This is my most memorable moment from the show...was watching the show from behind the board, just to the right. During intermission I happen to see an older gentleman with a "Phish Parent" lanyard standing next to me. So I ask him, "May I ask, Sir who's parent of the group you are?" "I'm Trey's Dad." NICE!!! I find out from our chat he was a teacher as well. Papa Anastasio smiled and nodded his head when I told him I was a music teacher. We continued to chat about teaching and asked each other why we chose teaching as a career. Lights dimmed, I thanked him for the chat, he wished me best of luck with my career, the boys came back out on stage and the music started again. Very cool moment for me. Maybe one of the coolest non musical Phish moments for me.
, attached to 1995-06-26

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads If you're on the fence about buying this archival release, I'll try to persuade you with these 4 words: "Stash-like jam in Possum!" Maybe closer to Dave's Energy Guide territory than Stash, really, but this entire show is absolutely worth hearing in multitrack soundboard quality, especially if you haven't heard it before, or if your knowledge of Phishtory isn't as encyclopedic as you'd like it to be. The LivePhish.com blurb advertises this show as "Summer 1995 Space Camp" material, and though Summer '95 isn't every phan's idea of peak Phish, it was a very transformational, paradigm-shifting time: you got your August '93, with the breakthrough into nightly Type-II jamming, then your Summer '94 which integrates the August '93 sound into a precision machine led by astonishing guitar pyrotechnics, then your Fall '94 which gets out there into the territory that would continue to be mined in Summer '95, though each of the latter two aforementioned tours have their own characteristics (at least by virtue of the seasons in which they were played, where many phans will swear there's a notable difference between Fall Phish and Summer Phish and their concomitant conditions of indoor Phish and outdoor Phish.) I'm learning not to spoil the surprises of a given show in my reviews, so I won't blow up this show's spot by giving away all its secrets, but to reiterate, DWD -> Free and YEM are not the only reasons to listen to this show (though they are very good reasons!) Someone jam chart that Possum immediately, though, for Pete Carini's sake, is alls I know! Good luck and have as much phun as possible. Sincerely, @fhqwhgads
, attached to 2003-01-02

Review by Deadphish420

Deadphish420 This was my very first Phish show. Rode a Greyhound bus for 24 hours from northern Indiana for this show. I was still 15 and travelling with my sister. I was going mostly because of her excitement for it and what the little Phish that she had exposed me to. At that point the only album I had listened to was [i]Billy Breathes[/i] and the only live show I had heard was the Nectar's show from mid 80's, so my Phish knowledge was very low. Not knowing 95% of the songs they played hurts my memory of the show itself. I didn't know what I was hearing. All I knew is Phish took control of my body with their music and made me dance my ass of like I never knew I could. Such a mind blowing feeling. I'm kind of glad I hardly knew any Phish when I went to these first shows because I wasn't chasing songs, I wasn't worried about how long jams were, and I wasn't picking the show apart which happens when you become a jaded vet. I had no expectations at all so I could be completely unbiased in judging what I saw and heard. And my judgement was indescribable love for this band, scene, and whole community. Since then obviously I have seen many shows and immersed myself in their vast live catalog and I've listened back on this show many times. So to actually review the music. The Chalkdust opener is really good. You can feel the excitement when you listen to it, both of the band and the crowd. Then the Gin gets a good funky kind of groove for a while before climbing to a satisfying peak. I love this version of BOTT. It explores a bit more than the norm. wouldn't consider it type 2 but it gets close to it. I also love the Round Room that follows. Underrated song and should be played more. It has a sick outro that leads into The Horse very nicely. The Stash isn't bad but it isn't great. Some good tension jamming but this is one of the songs where you can hear the rust the boys were shaking off from hiatus. 2nd set starts with a banger. "Another new song?" You're damn right another new song and they are gonna jam it out over 20 minutes. They used to jam the hell out of that song in 2.0. The jam dies out into the start of Simple. The rest of the show is good but not great. I like Thunderhead and like most phans I wish they play that more and Antelope is always fun but nothing else stands out in the 2nd set besides 46 Days. Cavern is kind of butchered by Trey flubbing the lyrics and guitar multiple times. Mexican Cousin encore was ok but there really needed to be a 2nd song in that encore IMO to make it satisfying. Overall, I think this was a good, fun, exciting show but setlist flow is a little lacking and, like I said before, there is some definite rust in there. I gave it a 3 star rating but it's more like 3.5
, attached to 1998-07-15

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Breezy, typically "Summer Phish" show, in my opinion, that nonetheless has some meat on its bones and some unusually placed jams. I loved the racing pig narration before Guyute, the Horn -> Jam is probably the only time Horn has been taken for a Type-II ride, and Tweezer -> California Love Jam -> Tweezer is funnily moving to me, as a fan of the 2Pac & Dr. Dre song (as well as the Joe Cocker song sampled, "Woman to Woman," and Talk Box virtuoso Roger Troutman's performance on the sampling version.)
, attached to 1998-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads All three sets of this show are worthy, IMO, though for differing reasons. The first is the type of set I'd love to see nowadays, with a creative setlist and noteworthy jams. The second set warmed me up to The Velvet Underground, from whom before I'd only heard Sweet Jane or maybe I'm Waiting for the Man on the radio. I've since delved more deeply into their catalogue (all 5 or 6 LPs of it? LOL), which I'm sure was a happy byproduct of (rumoredly) Page's selection of this musical costume. The third set is challenging, but full of teases and with a recommended version of Wolfman's... hey, any extended Wolfman's is okay with me. And if you had trouble with the "vibes" after the Ghost, I hope you attended 11/2/98!
, attached to 1996-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Some phans overlook or pooh-pooh the first set of this show, which is probably understandable given the watershed greatness of the second set and the Perazzo-guesting third, but I really enjoy listening to this show front to back. This would've been a hometown show for me if I had paid a little more attention to my cooler, elder friends circa 1996, but I probably couldn't've got my Dad to take me to it at 12 years old, anyway, and if he had he probably wouldn't've been cool with the scene. Ah well. I got my LivePhish download.
, attached to 1995-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The Who were one of the classic-rock bands I was least familiar with until I heard this show. That gave me a pink-cheeked innocence going into listening to the musical costume that I cherish and may never again be able to duplicate (though I wasn't a big Bowie guy before 10/31/16, either.) Icculus opener? Yes, please! The Harpua is funny with plenty of Mike banter; if you need a reference point as a newer phan you could think of it as similar to the 9/6/15(?) Dick's THANK YOU Harpua. Plenty of nearly proto-punk energy in The Who portion of the show, and the YEM is one of the longest versions ever (I think maybe *the* longest, but possibly not the best: see 12/9/95.) Perfect encore caps another captivating and mystical Halloween from our four.
, attached to 1994-10-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is absolutely my favorite Phish Halloween show. The energy in the place must've been through the roof. Funny Vibration of Death Harpua, great Reba and D. Sky in first set. The White Album is done to perfection, even the parts where Phish diverges from the Beatles' original versions (as in Birthday, for example.) And you get Fishman full frontal, which was surely worth the price of admission! Great third set and encore, this is just a classic show that some would say your collection is worthless without.
, attached to 1996-08-13

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I'm not a 1996 scholar, but this show is a worthy prelude to the Clifford Ball. I think maybe more interesting things happened during Fall Tour that year as far as Type-II jams, but this Mike's Groove is better than a whack on the back of the neck with a big fucking stick, I'm sure. I love the acoustic mini-stage setup they used in '96. I'm talking myself into, just writing this review, making a more concerted effort to investigate '96, which is often lauded as one of the most underrated years of Phishtory in the Forum. BRB!
, attached to 1994-06-22

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Tight, well-played first set (Summer '94 is all that way for me) and the second set is one of those huge segue-fests, coming off another one about a week prior at the 6/17/94 OJ Show of renown. If you haven't heard the Icculus from this show, you've got to. That may seem silly to single out from the entire setlist, but Mike plays this arpeggio(?) that is really one of my favorite moments in Phishtory. Hey, if you can't cherish the little things... Speaking of fleeting moments, there's also the Hakeem banter... Relentless energy and inventiveness on display here, just a fantastic show.
, attached to 1989-08-26

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I love this show, particularly the first set, which is absolutely stacked! I'm woefully and inexcusably unfamiliar with a lot of pre-93 Phish, and the 80s is the decade I'm least knowledgeable of, but boy man this show is great. If the setlist goes to show one thing only, let it be that Phish's catalogue was extremely strong right from the word go. I'll also put in a little, niggling request: Phish, please play Donna Lee again! Thank you!
, attached to 1999-07-10

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads 1999 is an underrated year in Phishtory, in my opinion, though most phans knowledgeable and interested enough to be part of .Net know many of its merits. This is just a great show, from top to bottom. Wilson gets extended a little bit, as was Phish's wont in '99, but the Chalkdust that follows is rightfully (and righteously) legendary. It soars effortlessly, the jam striking me just now--I'm a little verklempt--as a sort of updated soundtrack to the journey of the Famous Mockingbird, if you can dig that. Roggae is a great cooldown. Gin also reaches huge heights, as do Tweezer, BOAF, and Fluffhead. This show seems homologous with 2/28/03, to me, in that there are about 4 or 5 great big jams, though instead of the Destiny bustout, here we get the rare Back at the Chicken Shack. You've heard this show, or if only about it, no time like the present!
, attached to 1993-08-14

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads August 1993 represents the consensus month that phans agree Phish started deploying Type II with our now customary regularity. The precision is off the charts in the composed portions of songs, and I suppose the jamming was invigorated by a newfound sense of discovery and potency in a different way to approach "the show." Phish could honestly do no wrong during this month. I find myself overwhelmed by the amount of teases, but I would certainly welcome a return of that kind of variety nowadays in 3.0. Don't miss this one!
, attached to 1998-11-27

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The Meat > Reba and Vultures from the first set stood out to me in this show. The second set is one of those quintessentially Phishy bob-and-weave seguefests that culminates in one of the longest Weekapaugs I know of > Antelope. Wipe Out seems--kind of like the Moby Dicks in 7/11/00--almost designed to push Fish's limits: not that either are technically too demanding for a drummer of his calibre, but just kind of one of those in-jokey things that got carried on throughout the set and works in its own favor. Mirror in the Bathroom is thrilling, for me, and was my first exposure to that song. One doesn't often see a song segued out of, back into, out of again, and back into again, let alone Chalkdust or (almost) Weekapaug, but sometimes you get more than you paid for with Phish... oh, piddle on that, you always get more than you paid for with Phish!
, attached to 2000-06-14

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Both sets of this show are absolutely fantastic, in my opinion. The atmosphere of the Live Phish 04 recording captures the ambiance of the club and the respectfully attentive Japanese phans. There's just an inimitable characteristic sound to this show, and particularly the recording of it captured by Live Phish 04. The Back on the Train that opens Set 2 is my favorite version of the song, one that I feel is due a renaissance vis-a-vis extended jamming. Twist > Jam -> Walk Away -> is for many phans an all-time segment, and while I feel it has moments that are not quite as seat-of-the-pants captivating or risky, shall we say, as something from earlier in 1.0, it is definitely a series of movements that builds to a cohesive whole. The 2001 is long and gnarly, too! ;) Sleep encore is played by request, and The Squirming Coil is always a welcome closer. I don't know exactly what it is about this show that makes it one of my absolute favorites; maybe it's got a bit of the 5/8/77 Grateful Dead factor that such a great recording circulates, or that it represents a sonic direction for Phish that had been explored before but perhaps reached its peak in this particular show. I seem to recall certain phans have contended that 6/14/00 crystallizes what the band had been trying to accomplish until Big Cypress, and even extends and magnifies the grandeur of that style--if not matching B. C. in sheer scope--while rarifying it into a typical two-set show. Let it move you!
, attached to 1994-07-16

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I don't remember much about the first set of this show, though Stash and Maze were surely on par for Summer '94, with its relentlessly reinventive vigor in composed portions and jams alike (Type I jams, in this case.) The second set is memorable to me for the "verbal jab by Fish" about Trey's upcoming wedding to Sue (née Statesir), as well as the Harpua with the "Your cat got hit by a comet" narration. 2001s back then were not typically variable in many ways, often serving as a Set-II opener, but this one has especial significance, as explained by the show notes. Summer '94 sees a decidedly Trey-led Phish, with his authoritatively virtuosic guitar taking the music in newly explorational directions following the watershed of August '93 and its introduction of nightly Type II to the repertoire, but I encourage you to listen carefully to all 4 band members, as Mike, Page, and Fish were all doing really interesting things, as well.
, attached to 1995-12-14

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I remember when this show was released as Live Phish Volume 01. I was in college at the time, and only gave it an attentive listen on a weekend visit home. The sound quality of the Live Phish release is a bit dodgy, the levels not as smooth as some other releases; or perhaps it was just typical of a December '95 show that the energy is all over the place. Fine first set, to be sure, and one that would definitely please in the common era (bustout of Taste That Surrounds notwithstanding), but the beloved second set is all it's cracked up to be and more. If I remember correctly, neither Timber (Jerry) nor Halley's Comet had been jammed out in such a way preceding this show. Oh, how I love a good "->", and this show has a virtually nonstop series of them in Set II. Knowledgeable, longtime phan Charlie Dirksen (@Icculus) is on record that December '95 is pretty much all must-hear Phish, and I concur. On display in this show is a fervor both on part of the band and the audience that is rarely matched these days.
, attached to 1997-02-20

Review by oh_kee_dono

oh_kee_dono I have already written a review for this show but I wanted to say more now that today is my 20th PHISHIVERSARY. This show has always been special as it was my first. Now 20 years and 47 shows later there are still reasons I love it. It contains 5 songs that are my only viewings and another four songs with 2 viewings. Soul Shakedown has only been played 10 times total and Love me is only at 9 times total. Musically this show doesn't seem to be faring well on the ratings but I like it. The tweezer is short but beautiful. The Bowie is pretty standard but the intro is unique at least for my shows. I remember Stash getting pretty deep for a few minutes with a welcome Bouncin' at it's conclusion. Trey was making an impact on me with Free around the 4:30 mark until it's conclusion. I swear he looked me right in the eyes a couple times during that number. Not that it was very hard to make eye contact in that tiny little theatre in Milan. I'm not sure of the capacity but it seemed there were only a couple hundred people in there. And I was super close to the stage. I could hear trey's foot landing on the stage as he stomped along to parts of free meanwhile colorful rainbows of sound poured from his guitar. After sweeping me away with Free >Swept Away >Steep they played a Beatles number that made me think "I feel like such a hippie right now" I honestly don't remember much after that except trying to find our hotel and listening to The Prodigy, Music for the Jilted Generation once we got there. I love this band and all it's fans. See you out there!
, attached to 2016-12-30

Review by banjomatt

banjomatt I've been revisiting this show for almost two months now and I'm more and more convinced that it's just that good. It's worthy of all those superlative all-killer-no-filler mantles and excels in song choice, flow, and jamming. Each of the major jams (Gin, Tweezer, Gnost, and Light -> Party Time) contains a cohesive, complete idea, explored to its logical conclusions before seamlessly segueing to the next vehicle. Hell, you could even say that about Wading. The Ghost jam, particularly the The Wheel/Mountain Song section is one of the most transcendent pieces of live music I've heard. Oh, and did I mention that they played fucking Sparks? Kuroda's immersive Garden rig is on full display here, and I recomend hunting down a copy of the excellently produced webcast.
, attached to 1995-11-29

Review by qushner

qushner Excuse me. The Simple is pretty "important" here. It's not the usual sing-songy see-saw jam. Nor is it a shred-fest. Trey grabs a nice little ascending figure and rides it all the way up. Dismount is a bit jarring, which might be the only thing keeping it off the jam chart, but I'd recommend giving it a good listen.
, attached to 1995-10-19

Review by A_Buddhist_Prodigy

A_Buddhist_Prodigy Thanks @BurningShoreProphet for posting the video for this! This was my first show and the boys left my jaw on the ground from the start. I always remembered the Jim and PYITE (can't forget your first). But the Mike Groove was indeed great. I remember being flabbergasted by their energy and chops. When they encored with A Day in the Life, I was hooked for life. It's so nice to have video of your first show.
, attached to 2014-07-04

Review by newyorkphan18

newyorkphan18 Looking back a few years, and this setlist and show is exceptional. Personally, this was my first 3-show run. Camping at Lee's made this weekend a nonstop party. Tons of fun to be had at the campground both before and after the show. SPAC always an amazing venue for both the lot scene and for the music. Set 1 Highlights: Moma> Reba Runaway Jim, SOAM Coil Set 2 Highlights: Fuego> DwD Light>Fuego Theme
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