, attached to 1994-10-13

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This show is fairly straightforward....For 94's high standards. This in my opinion is an experiment show. Some songs are stretched out a tiny bit. There are little experimental moments within some songs. And definitely some experimenting with the setlist. DWD has a pretty awesome guitar solo by Trey. Foam is stretched out a little bit a pretty top notch version. Stash goes for a little ride with some interesting experimentation. The second set has a very awkward pace to it. But none the less it has some great peaks. Antelope is pretty stock but strong. This is when things start getting a little bit odd. They slow down with If I could I would. Then go into It's Ice's odd rhythm. And then follow it up with some acappella in Amazing Grace. They proceed with a very strong Mike's Sandwich. They toss in Yerushalayim Shel Zahav to kind of give it a spacey vibe (again experimenting). It is all followed by Weekapaug that gets very experimental with little break down sections by the guys. Near the end Trey just slaughters the guitar, he's totally in control and on fire. Then the guys move around again an play some Phishgrass. Then they get back on electric and play Cavern. Whew! What a workload! Fire is well fire as an encore. The whole show is a big experiment and historically may be looked at on the more disjointed and less appetizing side. But these are the shows that made the guys perfect there setlist. And hey the playing in this show is nothing to frown at!
, attached to 1995-06-24

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This is a pretty strong show. It's got a lot of solid and unique things sprinkled throughout the show. I really enjoy the segue into Rift in its prized 2nd song slot to get things rolling. Stash is very strong and intense as it should be. Coil has a notably beautiful piano solo at it's end that I like better than most. They burn through a couple quick tunes to start set 2 until they unearth another massive Bowie. This bowie does not follow the same rules as a 94' Bowie. It drops into some nice spooky space for a little bit before rising from the ashes into a fireball, fantastic version. Suzy Greenburg is also a notably solid version minus some of the quirkiness at parts. Hoods Mr. Miner section is insane and unique, Fish nails the entire transition section. This set feels more strung together then dense but everything is still pretty well played. Bold as Love is a standout thanks to Trey's explosive solo, very inspired version.
, attached to 1999-12-16

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is on the shorter side as far as Phish shows go, but it packs a wallop. Wilson seemed to get extended every now and then, even if just a little bit, during 1999; you can hear this on the other archival releases from that year. Chalkdust excels in energy, as does Possum, and everything in between is played well, however succinctly. Trey seems to be in frontman mode for this show. Sand is a very long version, but Mike mostly sticks to Tony Markellis's bassline throughout the jam. It's still a great jam, though, IMO, and is characteristic of 1999. Tweezer is even better, reminding me of Fall 1997, with the loops and ambient washes undergirded by a strong foundation of cowfunk. I could've dealt with the Runaway Jim being longer, but this is a show I am really into right now and love to hear.
, attached to 2016-12-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads A cappella to open again, recalling the similar trend of 10/31/14 songs opening the Halloween Run earlier that year. This show was more phun than memorable musically, IMO, but don't let that stop you from listening closely to Sets II and III, especially. 2001 > Carini -> Twist > Piper -> Ass Handed > Piper > Sand is quite a run of jams (well, Ass Handed is more of a microjam, I guess, LOL.) The third set is really spectacular to watch from the webcast, with horns and so on, all listed in the setlist notes. The choreography was truly awesome. I'm glad the three band members other than Trey were willing to let members of his band guest at this show. Now let's just get Scott onstage now and again, not to mention Oteil again!
, attached to 2016-12-30

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads A cappella to open again, noice! Cities gets taken out to the ballgame, with synth and Echoplex interplay prominent. Gin is a standout version, IMO, reminiscent in some ways of a Summer 1998 Gin. Sugar Shack is performed better than is usual for 3.0. Tweezer > Sparks > Ghost > Light -> Party Time is the meat of the second set, and that's how I like it: long jam after long jam, not to mention a bustout and a segue! I don't know that I'd seek this show up for a relisten very often, that being said. But that's really not a knock on Phish, but more of a testament to how many truly great shows there are in Phishtory.
, attached to 2016-12-29

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads A cappella song to open, as would be the trend this Run. Peaches makes a welcome return, as does Secret Smile (I really love Secret Smile.) Weekapaug must be heard to be believed; not an exceptionally long version, but extra mustard has already been broughten, nonetheless. Split Open and Melt succeeds in its goal of reinvigorating that song's jam, IMO; 3.0 versions have generally not impressed me quite as much as 1.0 or 2.0 versions. DWD opens the second set (you can see that coming nowadays, but okay) and mostly treads pre-established territory. Makisupa has a nice "Drums" segment, but it doesn't hold up that well on the recording, IMO. This is pretty much an average-great show, whether you ask me or not. :)
, attached to 2016-10-30

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads One more Thrilling, Chilling song to open! Ghost is taken for a bit of a ride, with some interesting flourishes by Trey, in particular. The now-rare How Many People Are You shows up... I'd like to hear that more often. Stashes nowadays don't seem to get quite as menacingly dark as in days of yore, but that's okay. What's that you say? DWD Set-II opener? Challenge accepted! The jam is long, but I think I prefer the segue into and jam out of BOAF more. It just seems to break fallower ground. Too bad Fuego didn't follow up with a huge jam, Harry Hood -> Have Mercy -> Harry Hood is a really nice surprise. ADITL is a fitting set-closer, I think.
, attached to 2016-10-29

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The Birds continues the 10/31/14-songs openers. Gumbo gets extended a bit, which is a nice surprise. I'm glad to hear More. Trey did a really good job in his playing in Maze. The second set has multiple highlights, namely, Mercury (not sure what they were going for in Piper but they were gonna go for it, for sure), an alternately funky and ambient Tweezer, and I Always Wanted It This Way, which sees Page doing what I've wanted him to do ever since he got the Nord Lead: use it as more than a sampler. I'm glad the new songs are being integrated comfortably and having such honorable showings.
, attached to 2014-08-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Great setlist all around, if perhaps a little songworthy. We get big jams in The Curtain With, Wolfman's, Chalkdust, and Tweezer -> Sand > Piper (the Sandpiper, if you will, for all you ornithologists out there, or just phans of the band Finch led by lead singer Troy Anastasio), though. The Chalkdust is my favorite jam of the night. It has a distinctive 3.0 flavor, if I do say so myself, in that it's more textural than it is "shreddy," and that's great! We still get to hear "shredding" from time to time. I like noticing that Joy was properly segued into; it makes me wonder if that has happened before, or since. Mike's Groove to close the second set is a great song(s) choice, IMO, and one that I would like to see more often, since Phish doesn't seem to want to put Mike's Groove in the second-set opening slot recently. I rated this show a 3/5, which just means "average-great," but if I had to rank Dick's 2014, I'd go 8/29 > 8/31 > 8/30... in other words, this is my second-favorite show of the run, and one of my favorite shows of the year. It was a very good year.
, attached to 2014-08-30

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This show--arguably--doesn't have the cachet of the previous night, with its balls-to-the-wall Simple, but the DWD puts me in a mind of, like, a 2.0 jam with the edges smoothed. Carini also achieves an addictive groove at the end. Great setlist construction in the second set, especially. The .Netlist doesn't list "In a Hole," which I guess is correct, since only one chorus of it is played, but it's still a notable facet of this show. It seems like the band is having a lot of fun here, which is always the most important thing (unless they play "Wait!") ;) Jon, Ernest, Mike, and Page Awesome Show: Great Job!
, attached to 2014-08-29

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Ye olde Lushington show! I, for one, am not tired of the spelling shows. That said, the actual content of the L.U.S.H.I.N.G.T.O.N. portion of the show is well played if not necessarily above average-great, energy factor notwithstanding (I say this as someone who wasn't there and only has the LivePhish SBD.) I'm always glad to see Jen and Nat make an appearance. 46 Days is pretty groovy, but the Simple > Ghost has some of the propulsive energy that reminds me of jams like the 8/17/97 (The Great Went) Bathtub Gin, the 6/28/00 Gin, etc.; it's a feeling of transcendent purpose that pervades the listening experience, and though I think those kinds of jams are mostly precipitated by Fish's drumming, everyone has to be equally yoked or it won't have quite the same effect. The Simple in particular is one of my go-to 3.0 jams, and reminds me that "they've still got it."
, attached to 2012-09-02

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This second set is certainly stacked! But first things first (I, Poppa, freaks all the honeys.) Down with Disease is in the first set, unusually for 3.0; I think I like it better there. Sure, it's a reliable Set-II opening jam vehicle, but the song is about 23 years old (as if that has anything to do with the price of tea in China when it comes to Phish... but yeah, it does.) Anyway, the Sand reminds me of Big Cypress: not necessarily just the Sand -> Quadrophonic Toppling from 12/31/99, but just the overall jamming style most prevalent at that festival of all festivals. Legit segue into Ghost, which I believe is a noteworthy jam, legit segue into Piper, and a beatific landing pad in Twenty Years Later. When I relisten to this show, that's the segment I go for, and sometimes I don't finish the show. There's high-quality video available of the Sand on Phish's YouTube channel.
, attached to 2012-09-01

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I'll focus on the recommended jams sequence: Golden Age > Prince Caspian > Light. Golden Age is not that far out of the box, but is compelling listening, nonetheless, especially since the cover was somewhat fresh at this point. Caspian, however, is kind of a premonition--or little sibling--to the Magnaball Caspian: one of the only Type-II versions in Phishtory. Light is wide-ranging and phenomenal, progressing very logically through a series of motifs and styles. That it ends in a colossal peak is noteworthy for sure. There are other things to applaud about this show, including the Tweezer -> Fluffhead and the Mike's Groove with No Quarter as the filling. This was truly a special run, and probably my favorite Dick's run yet.
, attached to 2012-08-31

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads The variety of jamming on display in this show astonishes me to this day (and I'd like to thank Phish for the longest Jim since--at the latest--2.0.) As we watched the webcast, it was almost as if Fall '97 had crashed the party to the delight of all, because there were actual, honest-to-goodness jams in the first set. Sure, the spelling gimmick is amazing, and the "We love Dick's" antics are funny, but the music is my passion with Phish, first and foremost, and it's remarkable how you can go from an ambient sort of bliss jam in Carini, to a peakier jam in Undermind, to a kind of combination in Jim, to pure ambience in Farmhouse (for goodness' sake!), to a coherent and thoroughly satisfying melange in Chalkdust. This is the best show 3.0 has produced, in my opinion, especially if you exclude Halloween runs and New Year's runs. It was just novel as all get-out, and I love it!
, attached to 2011-07-03

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is this phan's favorite day of Superball IX. From the Soul Shakedown opener, you had to know things were gonna be just exactly perfect. The Forbin's > Mockingbird narration is pretty trippy and phun. Wilson > Mound sees those two songs doing things they usually don't do, and Mound in particular has a coda that's pretty life-affirming. ASIHTOS has a droney, ambient jam that is--dare I say--reprised in Waves > WTU? You got your Time Loves a Hero, and Reba with the return of whistling and a segue into Bowie. Big Balls was a fun one-and-done, and No Quarter is epic. the Ghost > Jibboo > Light segment is great, and I've already mentioned the Waves. Why is this my favorite part of IX? It's just so phun to listen to.
, attached to 2011-07-02

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Long sets! Susskind Hotel (which I hope finds it way back into current setlists!) Monkey Man! Banter in Jim! Quality execution of It's Ice! Scents with Intro! Golden Age jam (sort of plinko, as much as I disavow that that was really a thing, though now I see how it presaged the percussion/Marimba Lumina/drums jams of 2016!) Piper > Tweezer, perhaps the highlight of the show! 5 set closers (Cavern > Golgi > ADITL, E: Loving Cup, Tweeprise!) Storage Jam! Whew! Note: I don't really see what "Storage Jamming" is in the context of the consecutive few years of Phishtory; like "plinko," I think it's just an attempt--albeit good-natured--to "call" or classify Phish's jamming style, perhaps in hope of a full-scale renaissance such as the cowfunk of 1997, the ambient jamming of 1998, or the respective styles of 1999 and 2000. I think Phish has settled down in their jamming quite a bit since 1.0--and even 2.0--and that, while the jams are still amazing, there aren't as many paradigm shifts as some phans seem to "want to believe." $0.02.
, attached to 2011-07-01

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads In some ways, this show is "A Tale of Two Sets," IMO. The first begins auspiciously with Possum, which, if I remember correctly, was nearly omnipresent at this time in Phishtory. Moma gets extended a bit, but in a Type-I way. Gin goes out some, and Wolfman's is probably *the* jam of the first set. The tale of the first set is that it's more ragery than the second, for the most part: read on to see what the codicil means. Set II opens with a legitimate "Jam," rare for 3.0 and all of Phishtory AFAIK. I'm not a huge Crosseyed fan, so I'll let the current reviews address that one. The most exciting thing about Set II, for me, is Simple > Bug, immortalized in perpetuity by an HD video on Phish's YouTube channel (and, previously, their Vimeo channel.) Simple explores some comfortable, even pointillist, space, before Bug returns to the ragery of Set I. Weekapaug also clambers along with its vintage Vermont cowfunk and virtuosic displays from all four heads of the Hydra. Show of Life encores kind of bum me out, when there're so many other "better" choices, but Trey really seems to love the tune, if we're assuming Trey mostly picks the songs, so... Average-great show, and a good beginning to Superball IX.
, attached to 2010-06-25

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is one of those "amped-up" shows. You can pretty much tell from the setlist, though there are a few "breathers" in there. I'm impressed by the mild psychedelia of the Runaway Jim in the first set; this song's tempo always feels propulsive, and though the jam here is pretty much Type I, and doesn't veer into space like a Summer '95 Jim, it's just a really good version. Free Man in Paris is debuted, which I like... Summer 2010 was kind of a little sibling to the Summer 1998 "Summer of Covers." I think most phans prefer the variety and diction of '98's covers, though--especially considering one of them was Terrapin Station! Chalk Dust Torture covers a lot of ground as the big jam opening and IMO anchoring Set II, though the segue from Alaska -> 2001 is novel, as is that from Light -> Possum. I'd like to point out that Summer of '89 is actually a pretty long version, and that I wish Phish would bring back Time Turns Elastic. I understand that judging by .Net's reception of the song, it's not one of the best loved in the catalogue, but I have the perspective that it is one of the best songwriting-and-epic-composition accomplishments since the Reunion. I don't care if you can't figure out how to dance to it, LOL! :P
, attached to 2009-11-28

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is--in my opinion--a mellower type of show than your typical 1994-vintage "rager," but it has a particular flavor all its own. Mike is low in the mix on the LivePhish soundboard recording, but I actually like the effect of that, and the overall smooth quality to the mix. Speaking of Mike, he's not very erratic at all in this show, to my ears: this is a really good group effort that is coherent despite some flubs. Foam in the first set is very well played, and receives a deserving raucous reaction from the crowd that's audible on the SBD. The biggest story of this show for most phans was the Seven Below > Ghost, which represented nearly 50 minutes of jamming, until then not seen in 3.0, and--I'm reaching deep here--not again seen in quite such a quantity with only a two-song combination to this day. Seven Below has a more relaxed, ambient, spacey sort of vibe, with hints of funk, while Ghost veers more toward peaking tension-and-release, though not of a kind that you'll be expecting if you haven't heard a good deal of 3.0 yet. I highly recommend this show as a pleasant listening experience: words you don't often hear used to describe a Phish show, but "pleasant" is the impression that I get here on this vernal equinox of 2017, with a warm day, plenty of sunshine, and a cool breeze playing around the old Howth Castle and Environs.
, attached to 1992-04-21

Review by KingDisco

KingDisco Ah the 1992 California run. It is easily the most consequential trip to this point for the young band and the energy is palpable no matter which show you spin. Everyone has their favorites but this is the one to seek out IMO. It will deliver on the quirkiness and oddball antics that define pre-1993 Phish. Some Yaz references and Secret Language and this show is pretty boilerplate for 1992. Where it really shines is the crumbs that lead us to see the future. Tweezer is great, not for pre-type 2 heyday but for any era. The band is tight and ready to take it off the launchpad. A Mike's Song is where we stand years ahead of the time. Multilayered and tight. Its incredible that they cover so much ground in about three mins of jamming. There are more sacred Cali shows from 1992 but this is the one that can give you a sampling of how things were to that point while also showing the glory days ahead.
, attached to 1997-08-13

Review by jvman

jvman Ah, my first Phish show. The traffic jam was legendary, and as a result, my friends and I missed Amoreena and Poor Heart. We walked up to an empty spot at the back of the lawn just as Stash began, and it was immediately like magic. I didn't realize at the time how special that Stash was, since I had no frame of reference - I just assumed it was always that electrifying. Since I was a serious newbie (barely 18, heard only official releases prior to this show) there was a lot of music that I didn't recognize at all, but no one could miss the level of musicianship on display all night. I left the concert feeling in love with this band, and it looks like history has really validated that feeling, since everyone seems to agree that this show was a real gem. I've listened to it several times since then, of course, and I feel that Golgi is really the only low point. I loved that song so much that I thought it was awesome at the time, not caring about Trey missing that last riff. That's the one thing that's changed in hindsight - they just didn't have it together on that song. Hey, it'd be great if Phish could be 100% on all night every night, but they put on hours of music at every show, in constant communication with one another. There's going to be a moment or two, or a song here and there, that doesn't quite work. Listen all the same, appreciate the contrast that those moments give you, and then before you know it you're lost again in the next moment, wondering how they pull it off.
, attached to 2015-08-23

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I think this is an average-great show. Stash, Reba is an one-two punch I'd like to see setlisted again, though! Martian Monster sandwich 2nd set is prooty hot, with What's the Use? bookending its previous teasing (and hinting, if you swing that way) from the opening set of the festival. I like seeing all those authentic segues in the second set, too. This version of Mike's Song is a good one, of the shorter versions. I sure would love Mike's to be extended with the second jam on a permanent basis again, though, and soon! This concludes my all-in-one-day relisten and review of Magnaball, and I'm left with the distinct impression of how far we've come since Coventry, and even that Magnaball trumps 8 and Superball for me. Phish is really on the crest of a wave right now (maybe that's an anachronistical statement, since Magnaball occurred in August 2015, but I think you'll know what I mean.) I'm looking forward to listening to and possibly streaming the Baker's Dozen! Viva la woman!
, attached to 2015-08-22

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads This is a very highly regarded show by many phans, myself among them. Among its strengths are fluidity, willingness to jam, and integration of new material. I enjoyed Scabbard in the first set, and feel that it kind of presages what Phish--rather than TAB--would go for with some of the "tropical"-sounding tunes we've heard debuted recently, such as Breath and Burning, and even Blaze On (Scabbard dates back to 2012, if I remember correctly.) The second set is amazing, as a festival second set should be! I'm not [i]as[/i] in love with the Tweezer > Prince Caspian (Tweezerpants) as many are, but I'm still glad to see Caspian get some Type-II love. The third set, for me, is most notable for an extended Cities and the jams in Blaze On and Light. I'll go ahead and declare that I'm not into the percussiony type jams that much, for example, 2016's (over-)reliance on the Marimba Lumina, but if that's what Phish wants to do, I'm happy they're living the dream. The Drive-In Jam is probably my favorite of the "secret" late-night festival sets! Conceptually, it's not as high-flying (pun intended) as the Tower Jam, but musically, it's my favorite. Recency bias firmly in cheek. 4/5 stars.
, attached to 2017-03-11

Review by MrMagilla

MrMagilla It was indeed a very special night. There were so many special moments... the whole show was really. It's the type of night you want to keep going back to and hold onto that feeling forever. Personally, having gone to UNH, but now living in Hoboken, NJ, this was a very personal night for me (I'm sure many others as well, Portsmouth being the magical place that it is). Trey brought it all night long and the crowd did too. A real highlight for me was when he played 'Shine A Light'. My wife and I were married in York, ME, just up the road, and my mother-son dance was 'Shine A Light'. So to hear it in that town, in that setting, really affected me and will remain an all time favorite musical moment in my life. I wholeheartedly agree regarding it being one of the most memorable evenings of music I've ever witnessed. What an incredible night in an incredible town where I took my wife on our first date (which she didn't know was a date at the time), had our rehearsal dinner for our wedding, have bought half my record collection at Bull Moose, have spent countless amazing nights with friends, and now... have seen maybe my favorite show of all time.
, attached to 2015-08-21

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads Oh, I forgot to mention in my previous review: I detect more Taste/WTU? teasing than in just Chalk Dust Torture. I think it was subtly carried throughout the second set, which is partly responsible IMO for the feeling I got of it being a bit dark or experimental. That said, I'm grateful that Phish feels comfortable enough to get dark or experimental--especially experimental, read: Type II--from time to time, but I prefer blissy Phish to Lucille-has-messed-my-mind-up type Phish. I think that in the 90s Phish was a lot more willing to trip people out in a quintessentially Phishy and weird way, and I'm kind of glad that they don't pull those kind of nans that much anymore, because I don't really see the point to it. Their compositions can freak out susceptible persons, anyway, and there's really no call for freaking people out any further than that, IMO. It's kind of like how Bob Weir could be such a wiseacre at Grateful Dead shows... I love what I know of Phish's individual and collective personaliti(es), but one thing I prefer about 3.0 is that there's more of an even keel to even the improvisation. I pray that the band stays healthy, happy, satisfied, and fulfilled through hosing us, however that may permute.
, attached to 2015-08-21

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads I wasn't there! So my opinion may be irrelevant, but my hair [i]is[/i] a bird, for what it's worth. I like the vibe of the first set more, upon a close relisten. Simple is grand, I could groove to the Dogs... Just, as I said, a good vibe. The Gin impressed me much more the first time I heard it, but that doesn't mean it's gotten worse (how could it?), it just means I'm in a different set and setting this go'round. The second set is a bit darker--or, more favorably, a bit more experimental--than the first's happy-go-lucky everybody have a logical time vibe, IMO. I love the setlist for the second set, though, and there's a really interesting groove segment in Ghost: the quasi-stop-start action, if you know what I'm talking about. Maybe fishing for woos that aren't audible on the soundboard recording? No Men in No Man's Land rejuvenates the set after a tentative Harry Hood with a portion that I'll contend is Type II. First Tube encore feels good 'cause it feels good. Great but somewhat wonky first day of Magnaball. Take my opinion with a grain of your preferred seasoning ;)
, attached to 1998-08-11

Review by jvman

jvman This was my second of 5 Phish 1.0 shows I attended, and four of those were at Star Lake. I think Star Lake 1997 was a better show overall but this one has aged really well. I recall thinking that Wolfman was well done, and listening to it now, it only gets better. At the time, I lived in a town that is almost exactly halfway between Erie and Pittsburgh, so Bittersweet Motel caused quite a response, and this has to be my favorite recording of it. But of course it's set 2, with that marvelous Jim, that gets and deserves all the attention. LxL was every bit as good as Runaway Jim, so don't skip it. I had never heard Meat before and everyone was looking at each other trying to figure out what Fish was doing. Now, here's the thing about Circus: I have never understood why Trey changed the lyrics. It's one of my favorite Los Lobos songs, and it's so evocative of heartbreak that it's hard for me to stomach any alteration. Originally, wheels were "rolling" on the ground. Trey has them "flowing," which is more tranquil and not, to my mind, in keeping with the tone of the song. A rolling wheel brings things in and gruffly rolls them away, whereas a flowing wheel is like some gentle stream, which wouldn't make someone want to burn the whole place down. And then, for some reason, Trey repeats the second verse instead of going to the third, which originally was "I'll scratch your name out on that tree / I'll chase your heart right out of me / it doesn't mean that much / it doesn't mean that much." That lyric perfectly closes the arc of that song. Maybe it's too melancholy for a Phish show, but somehow it always bothered me. Anyway, glad I got that off my chest. I should point out that the playing is absolutely perfect throughout this 5-minute, succinct statement of the song. So ANYWAY I was really not a fan of DwD at the time I heard this, which is a shame, because this is a really enjoyable version, though nobody would call it a defining moment for that song. A very solid set all around. Wilson is always a favorite encore for me. As for Golgi, unless and until the band says otherwise I will always believe that the reason this was tacked on to the encore was to make up for the Golgi at the end of Star Lake '97, which featured some sloppy playing by the band as a whole and by Trey in particular. I can almost hear them saying backstage, "alright, we can nail it this time." And I think they did.
, attached to 1993-08-13

Review by fhqwhgads

fhqwhgads In case you've never listened to this show--get the archival release!--or didn't pay much attention to the the setlist Notes, Type II abounds in both Sets I and II, in this show. I think you can clearly say that Llama and David Bowie went a camera in the first set, and at the very least, Bathtub Gin and Mike's Song did in the second. The musical execution of the songs, jams, and segues is still whipcrack-tight, though; Phish at this point was really a powerhouse, with some phans referring to '93 as the "speed-jazz" portion of Phishtory. This is one of my favorite shows, and I rated it a 5/5. The only realm in which it lacks--just a little bit, for me--is banter, but then again, there's some funny stuff in Mike's. And if you want antics, you've got Fishman on the Madonna washboard. In pace requiescat, Brandon, love you, buddy.
, attached to 1994-11-25

Review by pmc2kd

pmc2kd This is a great show and the SBD sounds awesome. Llama opens the first set and is a fine version. Excellent start. Trey makes some great use of the sustain and pitch shifter to deliver some major tension before a fiery conclusion. Guelah is a nice choice in the two spot. Well executed and a personal favorite. Reba occupies the third slot and is a first taste of some of the band's '94 era compositional and jamming chops. The song itself is played very nicely, with good work in the composition by Trey & Page. The jam kicks in nicely with a bit of syncopated playing from Trey and the band crafts a nice little pocket. They build a strong but linear jam that produces a fine climax. This Reba is not too long, nor in the pantheon of Reba jams, but is nonetheless a fine version with strong playing and a nice whistle ending. Bouncin' is a solid enough follow up and is played cleanly. SOAM is a great call after some blissful tunes. This one is not the longest, most exploratory, but it is plenty wild and plenty thrilling. Great jamming and tons of tension set up a great release. Definitely a highlight. Esther is not my favorite song, but this is a nice version. Fits ok here for me. Julius > Golgi is a nice closing combination. Both are played well and finish the set in good form. Overall a pretty darn solid set. Very nice jamming in Reba and Melt as well as a couple other well played tunes make this one a nice listen. Nothing over the top great, but not too shabby indeed. Set II kicks off with a perfunctory 2001. It’s more ’93 than ’96 and no where close to 97/98/99, but it’s fun and a strong opener with good energetic execution. Mike’s is up next and is a rock out. Very nicely played version, albeit quite short. I think it’s under 8 minutes, but it’s still plenty fierce and lands nicely into Simple. Simple is the big jam of the show. The song is well played and the outdo jam is nifty. It leads into a broken-down rocking jam that gradually grows weirder and more dissonant. Soon enough we are in DEEEEEP space and there’s some vocal calls over the atmospheric noise the band creates. We then get some tempo & dynamics jamming which they toy with nicely and add a few more vocal cries. The jam stays weird. Landing delightfully into the “oom pah pah” of Harpua. Harpua features a cool Thanksgiving story about various light beams and dogs etc. Good stuff. This is a good fun version of the song with a good narration. Weekapaug gallops out of Harpua and gets a good workout right away with some fine soloing from Trey. They then go more rhythmic with Page leading a good funky jam. This jam (like the Simple) goes deeper and deeper into space. By 5:30 we’ve got the rhythm section only reminding us of Weekapaug, but Trey emerges with some good soloing at around 6:15 brining us back from the depths. There’s another shift at around 7 minutes (Fish still on the drumbeat) where the band downshifts and Trey plays some frenetic notes. Mike is laying down some cool bass work and Trey is droning a bit, while they ratchet up the tension. By 8:45 Trey takes a victory lap back to ‘Paug land, but instead of staying in the Groove, he climbs crazily upward before brining back the chording at speed. They then down shift into syncopated landed that sounds as if it’ll pop into Sanity, but Trey picks out the Mango riff and they segue nicely into the tune. Mango is a good version and feels nice after a bit of a zany ‘Paug. Purple Rain & HYHU are fun. Antelope is the ender and seals the deal with some fiery playing. A cool intro lands nicely into the jam. This is your standard great ‘Lope (which means is surpasses most modern renditions easily in fury and execution). There’s an epic build at around 6:30 that’s really great to hear, with a very nice and patient release. A great jam yields a super spacey lyrical section, which is totally neat. This is followed by a great push to the conclusion. GTBT is a rocking encore, ‘nuff said. Overall, I prefer the first show of the release to this one. That said, this is a great show. The Simple and the ‘Paug are the surefire jamming highlights, with great versions of Reba, SOAM & Antelope adding requisite firepower. The 2001>Mike’s is also quite good and Harpua is always a treat. Damn fine show.
, attached to 1997-06-19

Review by Burglekutt

Burglekutt I just wanted to draw attention to Trey's banter before the encore: "Thank you so much. It's very exciting -- our first time in your beautiful country. We really had a great time. [b]As I said before, congratulations on hosting the Olympics in the year 2000.[/b]" Now, maybe I'm wrong, but this leads me to believe that there were some Austria/Australia jokes being made backstage: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRIUbFLjtX0]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRIUbFLjtX0[/url]
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