, attached to 2001-02-24

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks I'm not a fan of the first set but 2nd set is good, Gotta Jibboo being the clear highlight. It's the first version to really break the standard format and by far the best version we've seen so far. Still waiting for the sextet to do something new with Sand. I wouldn't recommend the whole show but definitely give that Jibboo a listen.
, attached to 2004-06-26

Review by jsauce

jsauce Listen dudes. I love phish. We all do. And I'm particularly fond of talking about the old days and how they're better than the new ones. Sometimes this is true and sometimes it's not. In this case, it's not. In short: I have no idea why these alpine shows are rated as highly as they are. Fresh off the news the band was going to break up and knowing we weren't going to make it to Coventry, my buddy and I decided to make this our last stand. We're both pretty dedicated fans and both agreed that these shows were two of the worst we'd ever seen. The coke rocks were practically dangling out of trey's nose. No patience. No melody. To complicate matters, a drunk girl vomited on my shoes. To be skipped.
, attached to 1998-04-05

Review by aybesea

aybesea The last night of the historic 4 night Island Tour... maybe the best 4 contiguous nights in Phish history. This one is another ridiculously good show, although it's probably 3rd best of the 4. Highlights: Set 1: All of it. This is the best first set of the run. Set 2: Really, all of it, though Ya Mar/Caspian and Possum/Cavern absolutely shine. If you don't have these 4 shows, run don't walk to LivePhish and buy them now!
, attached to 1998-04-04

Review by aybesea

aybesea So, here we find the third night of the amazing four night Island Tour... considered by some (including me) to be the greatest four night run Phish had ever played. This is an extremely close contender for the best of the four, but I believe that it comes in very slightly behind the previous show. But boy is it close! Highlights: Set 1: Tweezer, Ginseng Sullivan Set 2: EVERYTHING... literally! One of the best second sets they've ever played.
, attached to 2001-02-23

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks Good show, about the same quality of the previous 2 nights. Highlights here are the Gotta Jibboo jam (they really rock this one) and the Page sit in (doesn't actually do a whole lot musically but sit ins are always exciting, especially if it's a member of Phish. Looks like they're playing Sand pretty much the same way each night, not at all what they were doing in '99 with the trio.
, attached to 2009-08-15

Review by possum495

possum495 Underrated! I'm not saying this show is a gem, but it has gotten a lot of hate and it wasn't really that bad. The second half of set two is great on relisten. 46 days has a nice jam, one of only six ever Oh Sweet Nothin's and a solid hood. I will take that any day of the week. The first set had Esther, which we've gotten about once a year in 3.0 (and it was played well). The trio of fishman songs was fun, plus there was some good banter (and THE SLOTH!!!). So with all that said, this show did get a little boring at times (Alaska and Let Me Lie in the middle of a second set???) but this show is on the higher end of average (if that is a thing) and lots of people treat it like bottom barrel Phish.
, attached to 2004-08-10

Review by possum495

possum495 My first show!! I had been listening to Phish since I was a teenager and never got around to seeing them until I graduated college. So I think I wanted to see Phish before I took this big trip around the world, like a trip before my trip. This show opened up really nicely, with lots of people in a good mood on the lawn. The first set was pretty fantastic as I recall. I didn't know much about Phish shows at the time. I was also on a headful of the fungus. By the time BOAF peaked, I could have sworn that Trey was channeling beautiful spiritual transcendence through his guitar. Relistening (sans mush) to BOAF it is indeed fantastic. The second set was also a great time. Looking back, I definitely remember feeling like we hit a speed bump somewhere late in the second set, but I could have just been tired from standing so long. Dog faced boy was a treat, and the Hood was fantastic. I think it was the Hood that has kept me coming back. It reminded me of being a kid and listening to A Live One while I drifted off to sleep, and that feeling of being a phish rushing along down a river bobbing up and down not quite breaking the surface of the water. By the time they rolled around with "you can feel good" I was totally blissed out. What a great first show, but bittersweet in that I was to go five or so years without another one.
, attached to 2001-02-23

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks Very short version of Push On 'Til the Day. No jam. Nothing of note. The best part of this show I guess is that it's on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7mvTxbpC0g It's always fun to see old footage of Trey and the band. Tube Top Flop is listed on the setlist but in the video you only hear the first few notes of it due to commercial break.
, attached to 2001-02-22

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks Good show with some unlikely jam vehicles. First version of Gotta Jibboo with the sextet sounds good. Very jazzy feel to it compared to versions with the trio and this one features a full band Burlap Sacks and Pumps tease. Sand follows the format of the previous night's version. Drifting and Will It Go Round in Circles? are surprisingly the highlights here. They both get a bit of extra mustard and I'd say Will It Go Round In Circles? in particular deserves a listen.
, attached to 1996-11-16

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw This show rules. Anyone who only listens to Clifford Ball, Deer Creek, & Halloween '96 is really missing out. As with most versions from '96 Trey nails his DWD solo. I'm not a big fan of Guyute, in fact there are likely no Phish songs I am more burnt out on. But I actually can get behind this version it's really great. Gumbo has a nice Page Synth solo that I can't remember hearing in any other versions. Free is powerful and has a very good mid section. Bowie is a little mellow in the middle but is very strong. La Grange is a great bustout and a really weird song to kick off S2 but it works well. Jim moves into a nice pulsing jam and then moves into some really heavy funk that gets cut off. I'm torn because I really would have liked to hear that jam go a little further. However the ensuing bizarre trio of Vibration of Life/Kung/Catapult is also pretty damn cool. It also includes some really cool percussion and effects. Axilla starts the weird gibberish banter for the night that keeps going on. Hood is pretty great. Trey holds a note for what must be 3-4 minutes. It's cool but becomes increasingly obnoxious (which is probably what he was going for). Suzy is great in that it has excellent teases of La Grange and Axilla that mesh very well with the key Suzy is played in. The debut of We're an American Band is fantastic and a really great way to end this show. Really great show.
, attached to 1998-04-03

Review by aybesea

aybesea Another ridiculously great show from what might be the most ridiculously great 4 show run in Phish history. This one is my personal favorite of the 4, though all 4 are absolutely stellar! Highlights: Set 1: Mikes Groove, Billy Breathes, Dogs->Reba Set 2: The Whole Thing! Encore: The Whole Thing! Yes, it's that consistent. You NEED this.
, attached to 2001-02-21

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks First TAB show with the sextet is a good one, although it is clear that the band isn't 100% confident yet. The debuts sound good (as do the old songs with newly added horn parts), but compared to the band's strength in '02 and '03, the band has a long way to go. Push On 'Til the Day in particular is missing the energy that pretty much all later versions provide. The big jam here is Sand. Sand sounds great with the horns and I prefer this version over any of the versions from '99. To summarize: Good show, bodes well for the future of TAB. Band isn't all the way locked in yet.
, attached to 2000-09-15

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Great 2000 show. 1st Tube is lightening as basically every version is from 2000. Nice Jibboo with a nice Gin like hose jam. Antelope is a top shelf fire version. Everything else from the set is straight forward but they are playing everything very well. Piper should be a noteworthy jam, plain and simple. Nothing I have heard comes close to the Drum Logos jam sound except for this. You definitely get the mellowness and what I like to call the "Alien Robot Machinery" sound. Lizards is solid. Tube is the 2nd peak in the set. Not only is it played abnormally well they actually give it the extremely rare jam treatment. It takes you for a very nice ride. The rest of the set is average. Possum is always a very welcome encore and this one is fire! Overall a great show from a hit or miss year.
, attached to 1995-10-15

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw The calm before the storm. Slave in a rare first set #3 slot, it's strong and has a strong ending as most from this era. Excellent Llama. Bowie has a fairly straightforward jam, but still has the same great fire. Tweezer moves with ease into it's jam with some fantastic bass work by Mike. As usual a very well played Lizards. Hood is probably the most noteworthy/interesting part of the show. Instead of your typical epic build and release they try something different and basically whisper the Good About Hood portion. I will take the peak any day but still a very interesting approach. Overall a very average show and the valley before the giant hill they climb up to the peak of all peaks NYE '95.
, attached to 1998-04-02

Review by aybesea

aybesea A crazy great show that is the 4th best of 4 contiguous crazy great shows! I wasn't there. I wish I was. I have listened to these 4 shows so many times that I have them memorized. Maybe the most outstanding contiguous run in the band's history (if not, it's something in Nov-Dec 97). Highlights are as others have noted: Set 1 - Tube, Sloth, *Stash* Set 2 - PYITE through Twist If you don't love this show, you may as well find another hobby.
, attached to 1999-05-19

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks Good show to close out '99. The highlight here is definitely O-o-h Child -> Keyboard Solo > Sand > Drums. Sand has a really high energy dissonant and rocking jam. O-o-h Child has an ambient jam unlike any other version. The setlist has some mistakes here. Listed here is "O-o-h Child, Aqui Como Alla, Keyboard Solo > Sand." It should actually be "Aqui Como Alla, O-o-h Child -> Keyboard Solo > Sand."
, attached to 2000-06-14

Review by aybesea

aybesea I absolutely love this show, although I wasn't there (I really wish that I had been). The second set of this one is right up there with Auburn Hills 97 as far as being the greatest sets ever played by Phish. They sound nothing alike (which is a wonderful thing), but the groove on this 2nd set (really, the whole show) is ridiculously crazy! God, I love this band!
, attached to 1999-05-17

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks Good and very unique show. The highlights here are the Sand jam and the sit ins. This is the 2nd time we see horns with TAB, the first being 4/17/1998. This is definitely the most interesting version of Last Tube in '99, that's not saying a whole lot though as it isn't a jam vehicle yet. Seeing Phish and TAB play together for a couple songs is cool of course too.
, attached to 1990-02-03

Review by Timpanogos

Timpanogos Dave Schools w/ a tidbit about this show: "Phish and Widespread played together once at the Cotton Club in Atlanta. We got so wasted on Jager backstage the club owner almost threw both bands out before the show [laughs]. But then Phish got up there and made up something called the “Jager Song“—-to this day you can still find tapes with the “Jager Song” listed on it. Man, it was hilarious. A few years latter, while they were recording the Hoist album, Page and Trey came out and played with us at the Roxy in LA. It’s amazing how well Trey and Mikey [Houser] got along. They never tried to outshine one another and really listened to each other’s playing. Their version of “Low Spark of the High Heeled Boys” is just amazing. At the end of the 80s it was cool not to know how to play your instruments. But Phish made it cool to be a musician. Those guys really know how to play and truly love music."
, attached to 1999-05-15

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks Good show that doesn't stand out too much. Gotta Jibboo is underwhelming compared to the previous night's version. Sand is a good version and definitely the highlight of the night. Trey's keyboard playing from this show is better to my ears than all of the other keyboard stuff of '99 up to this point. This is the last time TAB ever played Bell Bottom Blues. :( Last version of Come On (Part One) as well but I'm not too sad about that one.
, attached to 1994-12-02

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Just another great show. Simple is it's typically strong '94 self love versions from this era. Fantastic segue into It's Ice they really nail the overlap. And the outro out of It's Ice is gorgeous as it goes into a strong Lizards. Stash is fairly standard, but it's peak is absolutely not standard it's epic! Coil is a great way to cap the set as always. Things really kick into high gear when Bowie kicks in. The jam starts at about the same point as all late '94 Bowie's do. And although this isn't the best or most epic of them all it goes fairly deep and has great intensity, and at horns kicking in at the end is a fantastic cap on that jam. The whole horns section is phenomenal Julius is outstanding, Gumbo is one of the best ever with horns (it's on A Live One for obvious reasons), Caravan is also a welcome treat especially with horns. And Suzy with horns is the only way it should be played just excellent. I love this sit in, it's what elevates this show to above average to me overall. Average encore with Cavern + Horns makes it a little above average. Overall Fall '94 rocks and this oozes with it.
, attached to 1987-02-21

Review by aybesea

aybesea My continuing trek through the early years now stops at Slade Hall where, luckily, the tape is a little better than the last two. Even so, it's a noisy AUD tape with a lot of chatter. As SlavePhan so eloquently paints the picture of Slade Hall, this show seems to come into better focus for me. Not that I was there, or have any inside knowledge, because I most certainly don't! But I can tell you that there is a really lackadaisical feel to the show as a whole. Lots of tracks are played very slow. There is a general lethargy to the jam segments. The vocals certainly aren't on the bright side. My theory (note that this is strictly a theory) is that the drugs at this party were probably pretty incredible and that what you're hearing is a derivative artifact. Anyway, notes/highlights: Fluffhead continues to impress. Well played and sung, but still without the Clod piece. Suzy is still miles away from what it will become. Very rough in this form. DMR always cracks me up because it's witty and not just silly. I really wish that they'd revive this as Dear Mrs. Trump. Next up is Camel Walk on ludes. 'Nuff said. I'm still digging on Back Porch Boogie and think that it should definitely be brought back. So fun! In my mind, this is the best jam of the show. Clod by itself is still really strange, and it doesn't work very well for me. I keep wanting it to land where it belongs in Fluff. Well, I gushed over the first Lushington (10/15/86), but I think I may like this one even more. Not sure... they're both really good. They should bring this song back. Peaches is sloppy and short, replete with a false start. Swing Low is played so slowly that it sounds like a blues. The first Boogie On is a good one, with Mike leading the way. This primordial funk is always welcome! Also extremely welcome is this debut of Ya Mar... Mike again, leading the way through the fog. Glad that this song has now joined the party. A mixed bag of a show. I'd like to rate this a 3.5, but you know that 1/2 stars aren't allowed.
, attached to 1987-02-13

Review by aybesea

aybesea First things first... the audio is really rough. I don't mind bad tapes, I really don't... and I'm telling you that the audio is really rough. You've been warned. IMO there are really only two items of note from this show: 1) The first Suzy gets played here. It is one of my very favorite Phish songs, but this version is truly bizarre! It sounds very different from the song that we've all become accustomed to. Definitely needs a listen. 2) The 2nd Melt The Guns gets played here and it's about 100 times better than the first one. Too bad that the audio is so rough. Also the ->DEG is really interesting. Other than that there really isn't a whole lot to like about this tape. See SlavePhan's review for more details, but unless you have a specific reason to poke at this show, it's probably better to just move along.
, attached to 1986-12-06

Review by aybesea

aybesea Continuing my romp through the cretaceous era we reach the landmark 3rd anniversary of recorded Phish. So how does the band sound after 3 years of shows? The strange thing about this show is that it is not as strong as several others from 86, namely 4/1, 10/12, & 10/15. The repertoire is filling out nicely, but the performances are really spotty. The sound on this is pretty muddy (way too much hiss removal I reckon), but the show is still pretty listenable. 1st Funky Bitch sounds pretty much the same as it does now. Page has a good solo. Weird intro on this otherwise unexceptional Makisupa. The Fluffhead here sounds like it is being played on valium... unbelievably lethargic. I Know a Little is better than bar band quality, but just barely. Golgi is still missing the intro, and it is played pretty slowly. But, IMO, better than previous outings. This one still needs to bake. Slave remains the finest song in the repertoire. This thing is simply beautiful by this point. Why don't they play Shaggy Dog anymore? The more I hear it, the more I like it! Too bad that the sound is so awful on this... I think it might just be really good. But honestly, the sound has degraded by this point to where it is not comfortable to listen. Anyway, it appears to be a really fine debut of this Traffic number. At this point, I'm really tired of Camel Walk. It doesn't change much and they play it pretty much every show. Ah... the jam. Best part of this show and the primary reason to dust if off and give it a spin. This is a very nice, trippy jam that builds toward an ABB thing. I really, really wish that the band would [have and] make available a clean copy of this jam. It's that tasty! And then... it cuts... NOOOO! What is labeled Swing Low on the tapes is really Ramblin' Man Jam->Swing Low and it's very good. I assume that the previous jam should have wound into this somehow. Another good Back Porch Boogie. Again I say, bring this one back! The Mike's here is a bit of a conundrum. The vocals are not quite right, making it less than desirable. However, the jam helps make up for this flaw as it is really spacey and leads into Drummer Boy. Nice! Decent Whipping Post except for Trey's vocals which are shot. But the jam is good and sometimes that's all that really matters. The Bowie here is pretty bad. The vocals are way off key, the jams don't work well, and Clod simply doesn't belong. So much for the Jam Charts. More pitchy woes on YEM as both the vocals and instruments struggle to stay in tune. Tush sounds like a bad bar band. Even the recently polished and stable Sneakin' Sally sounds pretty sloppy. I'm not sure why I'm hearing this so much differently than the other reviewers, but I've listened to every tape from inception to this point in order, and I can tell you that this is not one of the better shows. It's a bummer since the set list is so tasty and it marks the advent of year #3 for Phish. Oh well, I know that this story ends happily (maybe not ends... maybe progresses!) Better luck next time... cue up 2/13/87!
, attached to 1986-10-31

Review by aybesea

aybesea Continuing my tour through the early archives I come across their first recorded Halloween show. I half expected to see Elvis' Aloha From Hawaii covered in set 2 but alas, no dice. Sound here is really warm and very clear. For the vintage and environs one could not expect a better tape. As far as the songs, I'm limiting things to short blurbs and highlights: Slave is wonderful with soaring guitar work. This thing is already a monster and it's only 86! Melt the Guns is entirely forgettable, but segues into a solid Sneakin' Sally. I never realized how important this song was to the Phish canon until I started this foray into the early years. Halley's Comet sounds like an intentional comic version. Doesn't do it for me. Back Porch Boogie is a great little bluegrass number that they take out for a spin... nice! I wish that they'd play this one occasionally nowadays. This segues into Shaggy Dog, another tune that I'd absolutely love to see make the sporadic appearance in modern shows. Trey's chicken pickin' is outstanding. The Fluffhead here is just beautiful... very light and airy. After an early appearance and subsequent absence, it's great to see Fluff becoming cemented into the lineup. The jam sounds to me very much like it was lifted from Cumberland Blues. Really good and inspired, but more or less just a Trey (with a little Fishman) off the cuff, chicken pickin' fest. This segues to Bag using the same amp'ed up tempo from the jam, but it doesn't work well with the song. Swing Low is great little interlude... they should use this more often. Lounge music. David Bowie makes a debut at this show, sounding much like it always would. The jam is quite interesting and different than many more mature DB's in that it explores a lot of different musical nooks. Perhaps not the most cohesive, but certainly very intrepid. Good Have Mercy jam, although the tempo is a little slow. This song is so powerful, I don't know why they didn't keep it in the lineup. I'd take this over Makisupa every time. The Hood is solid, though nothing exceptional. I only mention it because at this point all of the components are in place for this song. It is done incubating. I know that there are others who will vehemently disagree, but I really don't understand the appeal of Sanity or Icculus (or Anarchy, though we're lucky enough not to have one in this show). In my mind the band is way too good at this point to rely on comic response. Skin It Back remains one of the strongest covers from this early era. This one should be played on a semi-regular basis in the modern era. Unfortunately, this particular outing is not one of the stronger attempts. This show really should be rated about a 3.5, but because of the lack of 1/2 points I can't do that. It's too good for a 3, but really not up to a 4 standard.
, attached to 1986-10-15

Review by aybesea

aybesea Continuing my march through the early years, here are my notes on this show: First off, as others have mentioned, the sound on this show is solid... really solid! Languedoc + Phish = Aural Ecstasy. This one is a pleasure to listen to. Also of note, there are a bunch of [at least recording] debuts on this tape. This is also the first full length performance that we have been treated to, so... let's get this show on the road. Alumni & Makisupa are played competently, though there is nothing of particular note. Skin It Back is a sweet addition to the set list, and Page does an admirable job of capturing that Little Feat charm. And then we hear Trey knock it down... nice! I wish that they'd play this more often as they do it well. At least we get a few of these in this primordial age of Phish. Segue to Cities and it's a pretty good one. TBH, I've never liked the lazy pace that Phish likes to play this amazing song at, but this one is a bit less anemic than many. The bass work here is really good. There was supposedly a previous H2, but this is the earliest one that circulates. It is every bit as beautiful as it is in its current incarnation. This lilting melody is so very welcomed to the expanding repertoire. I have to admit that as they sound the final chord I am just waiting for Weekapaug to explode, but alas... not yet. The McGrupp that follows is a really good one. This track has matured just beautifully and the musical portion is basically together at this point. The lyrics are still spoken (and double tracked). I don't understand the jam charts GD-like comment, but the jam itself is really very compelling. Next up is Bag without the modern opening sequence. Instead they just do an ambling jam into the first verse. Also of notice is that in this second reading of Bag, we get the over the top lyrical inflection that would land squarely in TMWSIY. Most of the prepared musical bridge is intact at this point. Also of note is that the ending used here is jarring... so much so that most of the audience doesn't even clap for a few seconds. Next up is YEM and it just seems to keep getting better with every outing. Except for the lack of the trademark opening, much of this song seems to have been worked out... at least up through the jam segment. They also include a VJ section for the first time. The elusive Lushington makes it's debut to close the first set. It is complete and well played... even the tricky, intricate parts. I don't know why this one has been shelved. It seems to be a quirky fan favorite and I, for one, would love to see it make an occasional appearance. Not likely, though. The second set opens with the Phish debut of Peaches. I'm a huge FZ nut from way back (true story... this is the song I had played at my wedding reception at midnight... you should have seen the crowd!), so I am geeked that they must have practiced the shit out of this! It is flawless, though brief. Golgi makes its second recorded appearance and is much more comfortable on this occasion. There are a couple of gaffs with the playing, but nothing major. Segue to a Dixieland jazz version of Swing Low. Oh my, shades of Phish to come! The first post-Jeff Camel Walk is relatively uneventful. The Shaggy Dog debut features well practiced vocal harmonies. This is another gem that deserves to be placed in permanent rotation. I love this version. Page tears up the honky tonk bits of this song, and Trey's chicken pickin' is a delight. Mustang Sally sounds like typical bar band stuff. The last recording of Fluffhead comes almost two years earlier on 12-1-84, so it is really great to hear it again here. And wow has it ever matured! With Page this song absolutely comes to life. It's so much fun to listen to these things evolve. The bridge is played impeccably. Sneakin' Sally sounds amazing on the grand piano and it features an a capella jam near the end. The Wilson is, unfortunately, just a fragment. But the Slave that follows is complete and sounds just great. This really isn't surprising since this song has been polished for a while now. Mike's is a really energetic version and the first one to truly space out a bit. It's nice to see this cornerstone of the canon taking some risks. Quinn & Have Mercy are both performed well enough, but there is nothing of particular interest in either of them. Hood, on the other hand, is becoming quite the magnificent beast. Except for the intro, it sounds very much like a modern Hood. Granted, it hasn't yet developed the jam that would make it a show piece. Set 3 is 100% silliness. I'm up for a little silly every now & then, but this set grates on my nerves. Canteloupe would have been a pretty strong Antelope, but Trey goes over the top on his vocals while playing the gag and kind of messes it up. Sanity and Anarchy are just ridiculous and I'm not a fan. Finally, after hearing Fluff earlier, we get Clod... the missing piece of the puzzle. Here it is far bluesier and more languid than it is typically found in its normal environs. Page takes the reins and almost makes this cocktail lounge music. Cool by me! So, conclusions? First off... get this one... it's well worth the listening time. As far as a rating, the sound is really good (5 stars considering its vintage and location). The performance ranges all over the 3-5 scale, so I'll call it a solid 4. The song selection is incredible because of all the debuts, so I'd like to bump things up a little. Overall, I'd call this show a 4.5, but can't because we don't have 1/2 stars (hint, hint).
, attached to 1999-05-14

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks Another great show with Gotta Jibboo, Sand, and O-o-h Child all standing out. I made a mistake in my review of the previous night's show. The Sand from this night is actually the longest of '99, about 10 seconds longer than the night before. As with pretty much every '99 Sand, this one is worth a listen. This the longest Jibboo of '99 as well. The rhythmic oriented section of the jam is what makes it stand out compared to other '99 versions. O-o-h Child has a nice jam but it's my least favorite out of all the jammed out versions of the song we've seen so far.
, attached to 1999-05-13

Review by NightSpeaks

NightSpeaks Another strong show. This Gotta Jibboo is a good version, although pretty much standard. The song/jam just seems to get better every time they play it. Windora Bug gets some effects-laden extra mustard again which is cool. First Tube -> Sand should be a > in my opinion. This is the longest Sand of '99 and is worth a listen. Smells Like Teen Spirit played by audience request is fun.
, attached to 1998-08-03

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Deer Creek Rarely Disapoints Few shows open quite the way this one does either the crowd was losing their minds or were wondering WTF was going on. Rhinoceros is a fantastic debut to kick things off it really sets the mood. Hailey's isn't your run of the mill typical version. It quickly goes into a nice Wah-Funk jam, very reminiscent of the cohesive funky fall '97 jams. Page and Trey are locked into eachother. It then goes into a nice drum led Mellow, Psychedelic type jam. I really REALLY enjoy this jam. It's not balls out and not super spacey it's really just right for me. Awesome Ride Captain Ride bustout that is very well played. The guitar solo is also quite noteworthy. Solid Moma Dance and a Strong Character Zero. Gumbo comes out of nowhere to start set 2. The jam is very groove based but excellent in it's execution. Sloppy intro to Axilla. A top shelf tube love me a solid tube. and if this show wasn't weird and random enough, The Wedge ends the set. It's also excellent. Now in my opinion most people were expecting When the Circus Comes and if they didn't like it they were walking out. But stick around because were still going to play A solid Antelope as a bonus. Overall a great show. It's shy of 5 stars but I'd give it over 4 if I could!
, attached to 1998-08-07

Review by Bob_Loblaw

Bob_Loblaw Not bad Not Bad They stretch their legs a little bit during Drowned, more of an exercise jam than anything. Stash is strong as always. Ghost goes into a nice hose jam that kind of swallows you whole then fades out. Col Forbin .Mocking bird at the end of the set? Huge bustout. Extra long narration that reminds me why I prefer these narrations over Harpua, it's way out there. It's obvious it hasn't been played in a while but hey still a nice treat. Set 2 opens with a peaky and well played Chalkdust. It's followed by a great filthy Mike's Song that doesn't drift very far, but still some great tone and playing by Trey. Very well played LxL. Fantastic Piano segue into Wading. Weekapaug has some really fierce playing in it and is a great cap (man they sure loved playing full Mike's Groove sets in '98 huh?). Nothing to write home about with a generic Funky B Encore. Over all not a very memorable show besides the Mockingbird Narration, but that's something I might go back to in the right space.
You can still access archived Phish.net reviews


Phish.net

Phish.net is a non-commercial project run by Phish fans and for Phish fans under the auspices of the all-volunteer, non-profit Mockingbird Foundation.

This project serves to compile, preserve, and protect encyclopedic information about Phish and their music.

Credits | Terms Of Use | Legal

© 1990-2017  The Mockingbird Foundation, Inc. | Hosted by End Point Corporation