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Performances Song History Lyrics

Demand

Music/Lyrics: Anastasio/Marshall

Vocals: Page, Trey

Albums: Hoist, Live Phish 10, Niagara Falls

Debut: 1994-04-09

Historian: Ellis Godard

"Demand" is a typical Trey composition (complex but not really “fugue-like,” as the band has described it) accompanied by quirky lyrics from Tom Marshall. But unlike those Tom/Trey collaborations that balloon into improvisation themselves, “Demand” often only precedes some other jamming tune. The debut (4/9/94) turned into a fabulous free-form “Weekapaug Groove,” in a set that involved much audience interaction. After being soundchecked three times on 5/20/94, the song took on a looseness that, for example, rendered a surprise segue into “The Sloth” (5/22/94), a nice shift to “Maze” (10/24/95), and a quick ragtime transition to “Antelope” (11/14/96). It's most recent appearance on 12/31/09 (after a 392-show absence) preceded a lovely meandering "Seven Below."



The song's debut appearance on Hoist included “Split Open and Melt” in the same track. After “Demand” ends, someone can be heard entering a car and putting an analog cassette tape into the car stereo. Then ensues the jam segment from the 4/21/93 “Split,” an instrumental mix of 4/4 and 9/8 time signatures that build in intensity until interrupted by a crash very similar to the start of the original “And So To Bed.” This crash is followed by a splicing of two versions of Phish performing Naomi Shemer’s “Yerushalayim Shel Zahav.” According to an interview with Fishman on the afternoon prior to “Demand’s” live debut, this ending prayer is “like the voice is rising to heaven, the spirit rising out of his body.” Fishman also mentioned in that interview that “Split” was the favorite song of a fan who died in a car wreck, and that her friends wrote Phish a letter to that effect, but that the track was set before that letter arrived.

The full Hoist track (“Demand” > “Split Open and Melt” > “Yerushalayim Shel Zahav”) has only been performed once live – on 6/26/94, which included a performance of the entire album. Some of the best versions came in the fall of 1995, in a legendary series of incredible shows (check out any among 10/8/95, 10/15/95, 10/24/95 or 12/7/95).

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sethadam1 Phish.net Staff Reply
sethadam1 I've always been drawn to this song, but only because it's a very strange song. The concept of the mid-song car crash and the character listening to a live version of SOAM is a risky move for most bands. I had given up hope that this song would ever be played again, it having been long since retired. But hearing it on 12/31/09 was a real treat, and they played it about as well as it could be played.
Score: 1
CannedWalrus Reply
CannedWalrus Delicious tune, this is.
Score: 0
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