Friday 04/20/2018 by raidcehlalred

WOKE UP IN THE MORNING: MAKISUPA POLICEMAN KEYWORD CHART

On Tuesday, October 23, 1984, in the garage of a house on 69 Grant Street, the band performed what is believed to be their first gig (so billed as Phish). We know that “Makisupa Policeman” was played, but that’s about it. The setlist is incomplete. Hell, even the date—while possibly correct—might have been a few days earlier, or a couple of days later. Not that this much matters. What seems to be certain, however, is that “Makisupa Policeman” is the first known Phish composition publicly performed. And this is significant.

As Phish.net’s “Makisupa Policeman” song historian Jeremy Goodwin explains, the song’s rather elemental lyrics were penned by Tom Marshall in grammar school – circa 1969 – a fact which prompted Trey, during the Philly segment of the band’s 2003 Anniversary Tour, to cite “Makisupa” as Phish’s “original” song.

The surprising reality of a Phish song “written” in the halcyon heydays of Led Zeppelin and Jimi Hendrix has prompted Trey to dub “Makisupa” as Phish’s “60’s” song, though those familiar with the tune and its pseudo-reggae stylings are quick to point not to Jimmy Page or Jimi Hendrix, but, rather, to Bob Marley and Bunny Livingstion, musicians slowly giving rise to what is often considered the new reggae movement.

The origin of the distinctive word at the heart of the song – ostensibly an imaginary place name – comes, Goodwin notes, from the distant memories of Tom’s early childhood. He took to issuing a singular nickname to all of his older sister’s boyfriends, of whom he was in awe due to their perceived coolness (based largely on the music they listened to and the occasional guitar-strumming ability). The inscrutable nickname was “Macky.” He penned these words while writing a song with childhood chum Chris LaRiche: “Hey Macky Super Policeman.” Years later, Trey misheard the first two words as one, and “Makisupa” was coined. Although this tidbit – recounted many years after the fact – seems in fact to be a genuine recollection, one should take note that Tom has provided fallacious explanations for lyrics many times in the past, seemingly as a form of sport.

What can be documented, however, are those keywords that Trey has incorporated during live performances of the song. Today, thanks to the tireless volunteer efforts of Phish.net users Dave M. (@doglogin) and Jam Charts Guru @raidcehlalred, with the help of Phish.net tech whiz and content junkie Pete Skewes-Cox (@ucpete), we are pleased to announce precisely that: the first (to our knowledge) document containing every one of the so-called “keywords” (or perhaps, more accurately, “key phrases”). And what better day to announce the “Makisupa Policeman Keyword Chart” than on April 20th?

Photo © LivePhish
Photo © LivePhish

Whether spontaneous, or “spontaneous,” Trey’s pithy ruminations always spark a smile, as they have grown from direct pot references (“Woke up in the morning, smoke a little herb”) to ignite direct political action (“Woke up this morning, NORML”), alight upon clever understatement (“Woke up this morning in Hempstead”), highlight the band’s (more than one might guess) brushes with the Makisupa Policeman himself (“Woke up in the morning, border guard in my bunk; he took his fucking dog on my bus, and he found my dank”), peaking in the run-up to Coventry with the brutal irony (“Woke up this morning, had myself a tall, cool, soy milk”), and even bravely acknowledging the elephant in the room post-reunion (“Woke up this morning, pissing in a drug cup; woke up this afternoon, called my probation officer”). All these classic keywords and phrases, and many more, populate the new chart.

When the band returned in 2009 clearly fitter, presumably happier, and, arguably, more productive, certain songs (see “NICU”) had to weigh upon Trey before being played. However, on June 6, 2009, when the band performed the first post-break-up “Makisupa Policeman,” Trey, true to form, delivered some self-effacing humor, when, after smoking a little herb, he woke up in the afternoon – only to snore.

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Comments

, comment by dscott
dscott This chart is rad!

FWIW - The (inaudible) on 6/19/94 is "Smoke a little herb."

At least, that's how it starts. After that muttered utterance, it's hard to discern whether what follows is laughter, a muttered repeat of "a little herb," or some other unintelligible muttering.
, comment by OrangeSox
OrangeSox Very timely release of this excellent work guys!
, comment by Capt_Tweezerpants
Capt_Tweezerpants I like this chart a lot... pot.
, comment by fhqwhgads
fhqwhgads You're in Mike's house
, comment by ucpete
ucpete @dscott said:
This chart is rad!

FWIW - The (inaudible) on 6/19/94 is "Smoke a little herb."

At least, that's how it starts. After that muttered utterance, it's hard to discern whether what follows is laughter, a muttered repeat of "a little herb," or some other unintelligible muttering.
Thanks! I just re-listened and you're right. Corrected.
, comment by tubescreamer
tubescreamer I don’t know if I’m fired up or bowled over by this esteemed .netting! Me thinks a little bit from column A and a little bit from column B.

Question: is there a known meaning for “dioxin on my head, gaddafi in my bed”?
, comment by OrangeSox
OrangeSox @tubescreamer said:
Question: is there a known meaning for “dioxin on my head, gaddafi in my bed”?
This is a great question. What a random couple of words... The original Gaddafi keyword pops up at a time when he was one of America's great foes, coming shortly after the hijacking of Pan Am Flight 73 and several months after the bombing of Libya in retaliation for a Libyan terrorist attack in Berlin. Perhaps he was just in the news.

I wonder if the dioxin reference could be something related to inconsequential school-learning, since they were all still ostensibly college students. I don't really see anything notable about dioxins around that same time. Perhaps one of those questions we will never have answered, but i'd love to know its origins too since it's essentially the most common "keyword" ever...
, comment by raidcehlalred
raidcehlalred @OrangeSox said:
@tubescreamer said:
Question: is there a known meaning for “dioxin on my head, gaddafi in my bed”?
This is a great question. What a random couple of words... The original Gaddafi keyword pops up at a time when he was one of America's great foes, coming shortly after the hijacking of Pan Am Flight 73 and several months after the bombing of Libya in retaliation for a Libyan terrorist attack in Berlin. Perhaps he was just in the news.

I wonder if the dioxin reference could be something related to inconsequential school-learning, since they were all still ostensibly college students. I don't really see anything notable about dioxins around that same time. Perhaps one of those questions we will never have answered, but i'd love to know its origins too since it's essentially the most common "keyword" ever...
This is something we pondered ....

You mention Gaddafi in a historical context. I'm far from a history major, but I believe a lot of the West's angst regarding Libya at the time centered upon chemical weapon fears.

I think dioxin is found in Agent Orange.

So the reference could be with regard to having these concerns on the 'head' (mind), so to speak. These sorts of things you'd have nightmares about, or would keep you up at night sort of thing ....

(Head and bed rhyming, of course / An ends and means ....)

Gaddafi was also known to disappear / had doubles .... So this could also be sort of a goofy play on that wild aspect of the story, as in: Hey, look, he's over here, sort of thing ....

Pure speculation -
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