Monday 08/03/2015 by bl002e

MYSTERY JAM MONDAY PART 194

Welcome to the 194th edition of Phish.Net's Mystery Jam Monday. The winner will receive an MP3 download courtesy of our friends at LivePhish.com / Nugs.Net. To win, be the first person to identify the song and date of the mystery jam clip. Each person gets one guess per day, with the second “day” starting after I post the hint. A hint will be posted on Tuesday if necessary, with the answer to follow on Wednesday. Good luck!

Answer: I'm honored to present to you the fourth member of the Mystery Jam Monday Emeritus Club, @PersnicketyJim, who won his seventh by recognizing the 11/24/95 Bathtub Gin. Be in the lookout in the coming weeks for a future MJM edition to be handpicked by our newest esteemed member.

LivePhish.com All-Time MJM Results


Comments

, comment by PersnicketyJim
, comment by CadillacRainb0ws
CadillacRainb0ws damn...
, comment by WayIFeel
WayIFeel @PersnicketyJim said:
Gin 1995-11-24

http://www.phishtracks.com/shows/1995-11-24/bathtub-gin?t=10m08s
Wow! I was still in October '95. I guess I would've eventually made it to the November. Anyways, still impressive. You're on a hot streak lately. I'm starting to think you have some sort of sports equivalent of PED's for your music technology for getting these so quickly.
, comment by ucpete
ucpete @PersnicketyJim said:
Gin 1995-11-24

http://www.phishtracks.com/shows/1995-11-24/bathtub-gin?t=10m08s
Christ, another one won before I arrived! Congrats on emeritus status -- what's the secret?
, comment by ucpete
ucpete @WayIFeel said:
@PersnicketyJim said:
Gin 1995-11-24

http://www.phishtracks.com/shows/1995-11-24/bathtub-gin?t=10m08s
Wow! I was still in October '95. I guess I would've eventually made it to the November. Anyways, still impressive. You're on a hot streak lately. I'm starting to think you have some sort of sports equivalent of PED's for your music technology for getting these so quickly.
I would certainly hope not, though the technology absolutely exists right now to win MJMs in an automatic fashion:

1) Download every Spreadsheet source.
2) Create fingerprints library using Echoprint.
3) Win free download codes from a non-profit website.

I don't think anyone would stoop that low though, so I'm going with the theory that @PersnicketyJim is an MJM savant -- he isn't the first, and he probably won't be the last.
, comment by PersnicketyJim
PersnicketyJim Don't want to come across arrogant in any way by explaining my methods below, but I'm comfortable with neither savant nor cheater labels. Thank you @bl002e and team for putting in the effort over the years. This has all been wonderful...

1) Identify the key. Maybe half the time that leads to the actual song due to the nature type II jamming; otherwise I memorize and reference it when scanning samples. It helps when you have "perfect" or absolute pitch, plus relative pitch. In today's case, it's in C.

2) Identify the tempo/beat. More of a general characterization (e.g. medium, fast, etc.) than identifying a specific key, but memorized and used for reference in the same manner as key. Again, in today's case it's right around 120 beats per minute. I'm also a drummer, and I've been trying to play along to Fishman for over 20 years.

3) Guess the era. This is primarily a gear/effects identification exercise. It's tempting to do this first but I think too many MJMs purposefully mess with this. Sometimes, though, the sound of Trey's "mini kit" really narrows it down, as it did today. Add a certain cymbal, keyboard or filter effect and it can be further narrowed.

4) Characterize the venue. Indoor, outdoor, small, large... Today's indoor sound combined with the mini kit pointed straight at Fall 1995. I already prefer listening to AUDs over SBDs, FWIW.

5) Open up .net song histories in a new tab, and jam charts in another. If the key and tempo suggest a particular song, I'll use the two charts to get a sense for when it may have been notably jammed. But if they don't, like today for me, then I'll just focus on descriptive clues.

6) Open up phishtracks.com (or similar online database) and sample according the memorization and clue-ranking methodology above. This is a rapid-fire exercise in which I scan approximately 20-30 second segments of jams before moving on to the next performance.

Today I sorted the jam charts by year (1995) and went down the list looking for mentions of Trey's drum kit. (Note: I laughed at the persnickety description of the 1995-11-09 Simple ... "Excellent and very rocking version, with Trey on the mini percussion kit, but in a great way." ;)

Out of caution, I listened to a few specially worded Summer 95 jams w/o mention of Trey's drums before diving into the the 5 that do clearly reference them in the notes. It took me only about one minute to do steps 1-6, followed by 10-15 minutes to get through perhaps 6 jams before I arrived at 1995-11-24. I probably listened to the posted MJM clip 5-10 times in between.

That's all. It would be great if someone built a Shazam for Phish - not for MJM, but for science. Obviously the advent of Phishtracks and its relatives changed the game a while ago. And once I started winning, of course, opening .net and refreshing became a Monday ritual. I should also point out that I honed my skills at @cmonster 's coffee shop - he plays Phish nearly every day and he indulges my obsession by refereeing while I pour my brew. @ucpete, @mcgrupp81: who's next?
, comment by cmonster
cmonster I will verify @persnicketyjim and his methods. I've seen him come in and tell about his trail to his latest win. It's always exciting to hear for a non-player but avid fan such as myself.
But he is definitely not cheating, though he may be a bit savant like. I mean, did you read his method? The man is obviously touched, at the least.

And I will happily play referee/trainer here at my coffee place for anyone who finds themselves in Seattle and in need of a caffeine fix.
, comment by ucpete
ucpete @PersnicketyJim said:
Don't want to come across arrogant in any way by explaining my methods below, but I'm comfortable with neither savant nor cheater labels. Thank you @bl002e and team for putting in the effort over the years. This has all been wonderful...
Thanks for sharing @PersnicketyJim! And to be clear, I meant no offense in my previous post. I don't think you were cheating, and you clearly have a much keener ear than I do -- so at least compared to me, I'd consider your ear as that of a musical savant (in the literal sense of the word, definitely not in the 'savant syndrome' sense!). Sure, I know which key most Phish songs are in and can identify the key in which the clip is played (which sometimes helps), but to be able to narrow it down to Fall '95 based on the mini-kit is quite frankly something I'd never be able to do. Congrats again, it's certainly well-earned!
, comment by PersnicketyJim
PersnicketyJim Thanks for forgiving my defensiveness. I do also look forward to the opportunity to help the blog win a future contest. I'll be sure to find a jam that avoids as much of the above criteria as possible!
, comment by mcgrupp81
mcgrupp81 @PersnicketyJim said:
Don't want to come across arrogant in any way by explaining my methods below, but I'm comfortable with neither savant nor cheater labels. Thank you @bl002e and team for putting in the effort over the years. This has all been wonderful...

1) Identify the key. Maybe half the time that leads to the actual song due to the nature type II jamming; otherwise I memorize and reference it when scanning samples. It helps when you have "perfect" or absolute pitch, plus relative pitch. In today's case, it's in C.

2) Identify the tempo/beat. More of a general characterization (e.g. medium, fast, etc.) than identifying a specific key, but memorized and used for reference in the same manner as key. Again, in today's case it's right around 120 beats per minute. I'm also a drummer, and I've been trying to play along to Fishman for over 20 years.

3) Guess the era. This is primarily a gear/effects identification exercise. It's tempting to do this first but I think too many MJMs purposefully mess with this. Sometimes, though, the sound of Trey's "mini kit" really narrows it down, as it did today. Add a certain cymbal, keyboard or filter effect and it can be further narrowed.

4) Characterize the venue. Indoor, outdoor, small, large... Today's indoor sound combined with the mini kit pointed straight at Fall 1995. I already prefer listening to AUDs over SBDs, FWIW.

5) Open up .net song histories in a new tab, and jam charts in another. If the key and tempo suggest a particular song, I'll use the two charts to get a sense for when it may have been notably jammed. But if they don't, like today for me, then I'll just focus on descriptive clues.

6) Open up phishtracks.com (or similar online database) and sample according the memorization and clue-ranking methodology above. This is a rapid-fire exercise in which I scan approximately 20-30 second segments of jams before moving on to the next performance.

Today I sorted the jam charts by year (1995) and went down the list looking for mentions of Trey's drum kit. (Note: I laughed at the persnickety description of the 1995-11-09 Simple ... "Excellent and very rocking version, with Trey on the mini percussion kit, but in a great way." ;)

Out of caution, I listened to a few specially worded Summer 95 jams w/o mention of Trey's drums before diving into the the 5 that do clearly reference them in the notes. It took me only about one minute to do steps 1-6, followed by 10-15 minutes to get through perhaps 6 jams before I arrived at 1995-11-24. I probably listened to the posted MJM clip 5-10 times in between.

That's all. It would be great if someone built a Shazam for Phish - not for MJM, but for science. Obviously the advent of Phishtracks and its relatives changed the game a while ago. And once I started winning, of course, opening .net and refreshing became a Monday ritual. I should also point out that I honed my skills at @cmonster 's coffee shop - he plays Phish nearly every day and he indulges my obsession by refereeing while I pour my brew. @ucpete, @mcgrupp81: who's next?
Nice job. Been too busy at work and when I check in, you've already bagged it and tagged it. It was interesting to hear how you break it down. I've never studied music and have always told myself that with Phish and much other music, I am depriving myself of an inner layer of the beauty by not becoming more informed. Kudos to you on your abilities. Side note: Looking at your avatar is bringing to mind the idea of the MJM spin off; Mystery Art Monday (MAM). "Yeah bra, I was totally checking Ascension of Christs from the 17th Century until he threw out that brushstroke hint".
, comment by PersnicketyJim
PersnicketyJim
@mcgrupp81: "Yeah bra, I was totally checking Ascension of Christs from the 17th Century until he threw out that brushstroke hint".


Nice. For the record, it's Solgiani's "Dispute of the Doctors of the Church over the Immaculate Conception", which is fitting of this site in some ways.
, comment by mcgrupp81
mcgrupp81 @PersnicketyJim said:
@mcgrupp81: "Yeah bra, I was totally checking Ascension of Christs from the 17th Century until he threw out that brushstroke hint".


Nice. For the record, it's Solgiani's "Dispute of the Doctors of the Church over the Immaculate Conception", which is fitting of this site in some ways.
Yo, you know that's my favorite version of DOTDOTCOTIC !
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