Tuesday 07/07/2015 by pzerbo

FARE THEE WELL - CHICAGO 3 RECAP

The celebration of fifty years of the Grateful Dead came to a bittersweet conclusion on Sunday at Chicago’s Soldier Field, the last of five “Fare Thee Well” concerts billed as the final shows of this quintessentially American of institutions. During this abbreviated final run of shows – that some had labelled a nostalgia trip or worse, a “cash grab” – a band emerged that very closely approximated the spirit of the Grateful Dead. Not just in the authenticity provided by a lineup of its surviving members, but in the truest spirit of the band, producing music that – in, at times, brilliant flashes – transcended all the bullshit, and gave us the real thing.


Photo © @soldierfield

Before the first set began, the band gathered to offer bows to audience and a group hug before The Last Grateful Dead Show Ever. Constructing the final setlist must have been an enormously difficult task – one last shot at their enormous repertoire as a group. The celebration kicked off with a rousing “China Cat Sunflower” > “I Know You Rider” with Trey and Bruce trading verses on “China Cat” and Bobby taking lead vocals on “IKYR.” As was the case for large segments of this run, Trey shined throughout, weaving leads both delicate and powerful. They opted for a democratic approach with Bobby, Phil and Trey sharing Garcia’s signature “I wish I was a headlight, on a northbound train” line, and the fifteen-minute combo set a tone of celebration and earnest joy for the gig. “Estimated Prophet” added to this first set’s “second-set feel.” Approached with an almost funereal pace that saw Trey intently following Bobby’s lead to keep (the lack of) pace, the jam nevertheless gathered some steam toward the end.

Built to Last” was offered seemingly not as self-congratulations, but as a nod to the enduring bond between the band and its fans. Bruce assumed the vocal duties, but it was Trey who would shine on this tune with confidently delivered lines that floated effortlessly and optimistically. “Samson and Delilah” rarely missed a Sunday show, and this version stayed true to the Dead’s history, even in the band’s heyday, of often sloppy performances. Phil’s “Mountains of the Moon” was a surprise call, given that it was never performed in a Dead show after 1969. “Mountains of the Moon” sent more than a few fans to the restroom and concessions, but that would have been a mistake; “Mountains” was brilliant, easily provided the jamming highlight of the first set, and one of the most patient, balanced, and engaging conversational passages of the entire run. The traditionally spirited “Throwing Stones” closed the set with an almost unrecognizably slow pace. At one point it seemed that Bobby had forgotten the song’s lyrics and we were heading for a “senior moment” but instead he delivered a modern day improvisation that “you can buy the whole goddamn government today!” We give you a hard time, but we love you, Bobby!


Photo © @languagestrange

The second set began with fireworks (literally) and then opened with their first big radio “hit” (and one of only two repeats from Santa Clara), “Truckin’.” “Cassidy” offered a good-bye from the band – “Faring thee well now / Let your life proceed by its own design / Nothing to tell now / Let the words be yours, I'm done with mine” – and also the jamming highlight of the second set, twelve blissful minutes that would have been notable show highlights in almost any Grateful Dead era. Trey took a crack at Garcia’s loved “Althea” that was compact but far from throw-away before yielding to the beloved “Terrapin Station.” Phil and Bobby traded vocal versus on this “Terrapin” that proved one of the only questionable decisions of the night, as the band was unable to find solid footing in the basic mechanics of the song.

After the final “Drums” -> “Space” segment – augmented by an array of psychedelic computer graphics on the venue’s massive video screen as well as on the webcast feed, in the event that stuff wasn’t already happening inside your head – Phil offered another moving testament to the collective love that all had gathered to celebrate with “Unbroken Chain.” Though born in the band’s prime and appearing on 1974’s From the Mars Hotel, “Unbroken Chain” almost never made it into the Dead's live repertoire, emerging only in the spring of 1995 just months before Garcia’s passing, also appearing in the Dead’s final Soldier Field performance on 7/9/95. They made it through the composed section mostly unscathed and validated the choice with an inspired if brief jam. Bobby then delivered a moving rendition of the final Garcia ballad performed by this band, “Days Between,” with the set predictably concluding with “Not Fade Away.” Trey, Bruce and Bobby shared vocals on the “Touch of Grey” encore that hilariously saw Bobby donning a “Let Trey Sing” t-shirt… never too late for one final joke. Never trust a prankster! A single encore would simply not suffice and the band returned one more time for a touching “Attics of My Life.”


Photo © @jayblakesberg

Especially given the unrelenting amount of shit given by many fans in the lead-up to the event's organizer, Pete Shapiro, for everything from ticket prices and distribution to the show’s venues, it should be said that these events were exceptionally well-run, professional, and fan friendly. The record-breaking crowds of 70k+ in attendance each day truly put the revamped Soldier Field facilities to the test, with bathroom and concession lines often challenging, and the biggest complaint being the congestion ordeal of exiting the venue on the routes back to civilization. But other than some of these difficulties inherent in any big event, those in attendance seemed no worse off from the experience (far from it!). The in-venue visuals by Candace Brightman and Paul Hoffman were spectacular, and the at-home production was also stellar, with virtually flawless delivery, outstanding production value, crystal clear and full sound, and magnificent halftime video montages by Justin Kreutzmann with original music by Neal Casal. There were a million things that could have gone wrong, but most everything went right; so kudos to everyone involved in putting together these historic events in a way that allowed fans to keep their focus where it belonged, on the stage.


Photo © @languagestrange

The band on that stage produced some truly inspired music. I’ll readily admit that I was skeptical from the outset – these guys don’t play together regularly, for reasons. The Grateful Dead was a democratic institution to a fault, and you don’t need to be a rock-and-roll hall famer to know that sometimes you just want to do your own thing, the way you want. Put those guys who are used to having things precisely their way back into that democratic cauldron… it doesn’t often work. To be honest, it hasn't worked all that well in the post-Jerry attempts to date. That they put aside those differences to gather as a group one last time was no surprise, as the incentives to do so were plentiful. That they did so and produced music of a quality that was deserving of the mantle of the band’s name, Grateful Dead – that surprised me. To Bobby, Phil, Mickey and Billy: thank you, for this weekend, and for the music that has been the soundtrack to my life since my first show in 1981. Bruce Hornsby and Jeff Chimenti also deserve the appreciation, respect, and thanks of fans for their contributions to this continuum of music known as the Grateful Dead.


Photo © @languagestrange

These shows were clearly not about Trey Anastasio. But we’re covering this on phish.net because of his involvement, so a few concluding words about his performace are in order. What a moment for him… as happy as I was to be listening to my favorite living musician playing with the band I grew up with, I was more happy for Trey. This obviously was far from the first time he’s had the opportunity to play these songs with members of the Dead, but to be able to attack the catalog so fully, to not only perform the songs but really lead the band through jam after jam, on the biggest of stages, it was a profound joy to witness. Grateful Dead music that is good requires a lead guitarist who can execute the compositions competently; Grateful Dead music that is great requires a lead guitarist that can converse as an equal, but also put the band on his shoulders and elevate the whole. Trey did both. Trey Anastasio didn’t need the validation of being able to fill the hardest hole to fill in all of rock and roll – and to gain the appreciation, respect and even love of the only rock audience more skeptical than Phish fans – to be known by many as the world’s greatest living rock musician. But it sure doesn’t hurt. The implications for Phish of this experience? Could be huge... simply huge.

Sayin’ thank you!… for a real good time!

Phillip Zerbo

(Chicago1 Recap; Chicago2 Recap)

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Comments

, comment by velcro
velcro Thank you! A truly magical weekend.
, comment by catacea
catacea Thoughtful and appropriate reviews, thanks for taking the time to convey the experience so completely.
, comment by User_25940_
User_25940_ Great read. My feelings exactly. And for those that weren't there or didn't see it on PPV, when Attics was playing they should an image of each band member, and when Trey's picture came up, it got the loudest applause, by far. Thank you Trey, thank you GD, thank you Chicago, and thank you to all the Deadheads I spent so many,many years with. These shows could not have been more fun.
, comment by bicknosco
bicknosco Very good review. And I do agree this will be huge for phish. I do believe this was one of the greatest things Trey could have done for his career in music. I believe this will give Trey more legitimacy outside the phish community to the people who criticize without fully listening or even make an attempt to understand Phish. Good things to come.
, comment by tek9rifleskills
tek9rifleskills Wonderful weekends and wonderful music from all these guys! Thanks for this reflection and review it is nice to read :)
, comment by driftlessMN
driftlessMN Well said for sure, thank you for an excellent recap. The weekend was wonderful and fully surpassed my expectations. I had a blast each night and every set, but the pure joy I felt during that 2nd set on Friday night was tremendous. It was such a thrill to see that collection of musicians share the stage last weekend, & I cannot say enough about Trey, the hard work was definitely admired and appreciated. Very well done.
, comment by chillable
chillable Thanks for the writeup, you really nailed it. I went into these shows expecting to have fun and feel nostalgic. What I wasn't expecting was to be truly back in the moment of 'feeling' a real Dead show again. My heart will be full from that experience for a long time to come.
, comment by DividedSkywalkerNYC
DividedSkywalkerNYC Fabulous review! Trey's preparation was outstanding and thorough; he even played the "Touch" solo - a personal favorite - note-for-note. I smiled as many Phish fans must have when Trey got the loudest cheers, but was that the non-Phish crowd acknowledging his stellar contributions or the Phish fans in attendance screaming for their "Jerry" having overachieved on the largest stage of his career? I agree that potential implications of Trey's performance could be huge, but in what form? As much as I live and breath Phish it's hard to see how this past weekend catapults them to a higher plateau. Maybe more exposure for Trey? It will be interesting to see how this plays out, both intellectually and musically.
, comment by User_25940_
User_25940_ Those applause for Trey were mainly from Deadheads who were simply
in awe of his performances for all 5 nights. Deadheads know good music
when they hear it, and Trey elevated this whole run in a way
I'm sure most people didn't expect. And the rest of the
band fed off it. What a run.
, comment by ckess22
ckess22 Great review. Great run. Bravo to all involved. And Trey...it's really hard to come up w the words. He's the man, plain and simple.
, comment by Uakari
Uakari Well done amigo!
, comment by Phriend_of_the_Devil
Phriend_of_the_Devil An amazing weekend on so many levels. It was not the Grateful Dead, and could never be without Jerry. But it was truly Grateful Dead music, warts and all, played with a raw power and willingness to take risks that at its best moments approached peaks perhaps not reached since 1977. Leaving the Cap in Port Chester on Sunday night, I felt a sense of deep contentment (and relief that the haters had been so wrong these past several months) and a feeling of closure. At the same time, I felt a great sense of joy from realizing that there is still "furthur" to go. The music will continue to play the band, whether it is Phil & Friends, JRAD, DSO, and perhaps occasionally now, hopefully, our favorite band from Vermont.
, comment by ivorytusk
ivorytusk Very well reviewed! I was so happy for the boys, and especially for Trey . . .
, comment by bryontreece
bryontreece Thanks for a thoughtful & well written review....not that I would have expected any less. :)
, comment by Pictures_of_Chairman_Mao
Pictures_of_Chairman_Mao Yes - great review. Was in attendance all 3 nights. You summed it up pretty much perfectly. Nice job.
, comment by Scott
Scott The halting Terrapin and awkwardly slow presentations of a few other songs including Throwing Stones and TMNS (for the first half) really speak to the lack of time the whole band spent together.

Hornsby should have been better prepared for these shows. If he was, I bet he would have earned a few more singing parts. As it was, his piano was functional, but not rising to the level of the occasion.

The musical creativity and performance was best on the left, weakest on the right. Trey, Phil, Billy, and (in Chicago anyway) Bob were great. The other three were mostly superfluous. Mickey earned the right to be there, but he wisely played with brushes for the half of the material he was less prepared to play.

Yet the numerous highlights were very high and worthy of the legacy of the Grateful Dead. Lots of great music underneath all that production and talent and age, built on a foundation laid in 1965. I felt like a guest, but I really enjoyed participating in the anniversary celebrations and thought they were a big if imperfect success.
, comment by Jestinphish
Jestinphish What a great write-up. Couldn't agree more. It was wonderful. I felt so lucky to be there and see not only how much it meant to the fans, but also how much they band enjoyed it. Most of them played with a smile all night long, for three nights in a row. And Trey.... What can be said? What an honor for him and how awesome that he not only rose to the occasion, but far exceeded anyone's expectations. He was simply brilliant to watch and listen to. As a guitar player I was in awe of not only his tone, but his ability to change his phrasing and attack. He used different scales than he normally does. He left the arpeggios at home. He truly fused his style with what he took from Jerry's and it was beautiful to watch.

My biggest hope after watching these shows is that Trey learned a little bit more patience from the old gents. From the granddaddies of the scene. I would love to see Phish lay back a little more often and see where the music goes, because the times they have that I have seen or heard usually produces some tremendous results.

I haven't been this excited for a summer tour in a long time and these three shows made me crack open the saving account and grab tickets for Hotlanta and Blossom Center, in addition to Alpine and Dicks that were already part of the summer plan. Bring it on boys.

And lastly to the Dead. I was lucky enough to be there when I was 16 years old for the last shows in '95. I "got it" immediately and delved into hours and hours of live Dead material, it was all I listened to. I made plans with all my friends to head out over our summer after junior year for Dead tour in '96. And I was crushed by that news in early August. Even after my few months with them I felt a sense of loss and could only imagine what was felt by those that had loved them from the start. Luckily a few weeks later my buddy Joe played me a little ditty called "Reba" by this band called Phish (while we smoked a joint in his car before going into a basketball game at our high school). I was blown away... And I had a place to focus my musical appetite. The more I learned about the band, the more I loved them. Gamehendge.... 20-30 minute songs... Secret language... I finally found something to call my own! And I am fairly sure it never would have come around if it wasn't for a small band from California called the Warlocks that grew into not only into the Grateful Dead, but a movement and a lifestyle.

So to the men that started it all... I can only say thank you. From the bottom of my heart. I simply can not imagine how empty my life would have been without the music of these two bands. It has provided not only the soundtrack to my adult life, but some of my fondest memories.
, comment by phootyjon
phootyjon Very well written; thank you for your efforts. I am so excited to see how this all translates to summer tour and beyond. I am so grateful to be a phan. See you OR kiddos!
, comment by Destiny_Bound
Destiny_Bound @DividedSkywalkerNYC said:
Fabulous review! Trey's preparation was outstanding and thorough; he even played the "Touch" solo - a personal favorite - note-for-note. I smiled as many Phish fans must have when Trey got the loudest cheers, but was that the non-Phish crowd acknowledging his stellar contributions or the Phish fans in attendance screaming for their "Jerry" having overachieved on the largest stage of his career? I agree that potential implications of Trey's performance could be huge, but in what form? As much as I live and breath Phish it's hard to see how this past weekend catapults them to a higher plateau. Maybe more exposure for Trey? It will be interesting to see how this plays out, both intellectually and musically.
The training, research, dedication, patience, playing with others, finger licks, methodology, rehearsals.... how could this not improve the man as a musical artist? This is what the greatest "Phish" impact will be, our friend Trey went through an introspective boot camp at a critical point in his career. Rest on his laurels? heck no, he went to work, challenged his inner musician soul, and will attack HIS catalogue of music with a greater ferocity. After a strong '12, debut music in '13, hitting road with new music in '14, things were starting to get stale again. This is exactly what the band needed for '15 and beyond.
, comment by Destiny_Bound
Destiny_Bound and...excellent review. and @Jestinphish, awesome dude, thanks for sharing.

What may be in store for Alpine on 8/9? A return stop at the Terrapin station? Endless possibilities this summer, and less than 2 weeks away from Bend, OR. Woo!
, comment by psuphan
psuphan Great review from top to bottom. Got chills a few times reading your closing words about Trey, and you're absolutely right... The implications could be HUGE! I can't wait to find out!
, comment by jwp86
jwp86 @Jestinphish said:

My biggest hope after watching these shows is that Trey learned a little bit more patience from the old gents. From the granddaddies of the scene. I would love to see Phish lay back a little more often and see where the music goes, because the times they have that I have seen or heard usually produces some tremendous results.
I couldn't agree more. It looked like at least a couple of time Phil and Bobby gave Trey the "slow down" sign. Not to take away at all from how amazing he was at these shows, or how amazing he is with Phish, but a bit more patience would, I think, be a very good thing.

Also, I had a very similar experience in 95, seeing my first Dead show on St. Patty's Day in Philly, then my first Phish show at the Mann on 6/25/95. Two events that changed my life profoundly. Bring on summer tour!
, comment by blombekr
blombekr Excellent review. Sunday was pure magic. Trey is a God. Let's go, Phish.
, comment by nicuenjoymyself
nicuenjoymyself great read thanks for everything you guys do to bring us closer to the music
, comment by ColForbin
ColForbin @Scott said:
The musical creativity and performance was best on the left, weakest on the right. Trey, Phil, Billy, and (in Chicago anyway) Bob were great. The other three were mostly superfluous. Mickey earned the right to be there, but he wisely played with brushes for the half of the material he was less prepared to play.
You aren't wrong here, at all, but I did a listen of 7/4 with headphones yesterday and was able to better hear Bruce and Jeff's contributions. I gained a little more appreciation for what they were up to.
, comment by philanthropist
philanthropist Wow! Thank You! I could have written this piece! (although not quite as well!! ;) ) It really echoed a lot of sentiments and thoughts I had about the lead-up to FTW and the shows themselves.
I was there the whole weekend, grew up as a deadhead seeing 35 GD with Jerry and quite a few Jerry Garcia Band shows, 90 Phish shows since '97, and I honestly agree with virtually everything you said. The piece even made me tear up a little, not the first tear-up this week!
Not sure about the implications to Phish, though, but I can't wait to find out!
, comment by philanthropist
philanthropist @DividedSkywalkerNYC said:
Fabulous review! Trey's preparation was outstanding and thorough; he even played the "Touch" solo - a personal favorite - note-for-note. I smiled as many Phish fans must have when Trey got the loudest cheers, but was that the non-Phish crowd acknowledging his stellar contributions or the Phish fans in attendance screaming for their "Jerry" having overachieved on the largest stage of his career? I agree that potential implications of Trey's performance could be huge, but in what form? As much as I live and breath Phish it's hard to see how this past weekend catapults them to a higher plateau. Maybe more exposure for Trey? It will be interesting to see how this plays out, both intellectually and musically.

I have the same questions about the implications to Phish. It will be interesting to see how it plays out.
, comment by jonesgator
jonesgator The only thing this event did for me (besides provide me with hours of great fucking music to listen to) is remind me that I need to appreciate Phish while they are here and for what they want to play. I don't expect (or want) Trey's playing to be heavily influenced by the catalog of songs he learned for FTW. I loved his contribution to the Grateful Dead shows, but I am happy each and every time I get to see our band play their own music. If Trey wants to spray some Jerry licks into his jams, or if the band wants to add some Dead tunes to the offering, that's great. But we shouldn't go into this summer with the expectation that these things will happen, nor should we really want these things to happen. Fewer expectations and more open ears is my motto going forward.
, comment by JustACoupleTimes
JustACoupleTimes It's refreshing to read resounding positive reviews. As someone who was at an age that limited my experience of The Live GD universe to 93' and 94' (both in Chicago), it has always been sore to hear comparisons and rhetoric making unnecessary judgments about this band vs. that band, this guitar player vs. that one. Have we been that negatively conditioned by politics?
Let's respect ALL players here. I think if someone negates the efforts of Trey (or anyone with whom they are not familiar), then they are disrespecting the collective choices of the original GD members to include anyone else. Complain about that choices made and you are indirectly slamming the players who were involved in helping create a musical/culturally conscious movement.
, comment by nichobert
nichobert Feel like now is as good of a time as any to turn the clock back 16 years to the first time Trey (and Page) got the chance to truly dig into the Dead's music.

Those Warfield Phil and Friends shows from April 1999 were something I remember adoring right afterwards but I never kept them in the rotation. Over the last few weeks that has come to feel like a missed opportunity. Because I should have been evangelizing for these shows this whole time.

Listening to them now I'm absolutely stunned by how excellent the improvisation is. There's a part of me that feels like the improv highlight reel from these 3 nights challenges the very best 3 night stretches the Dead or Phish ever did. From Viola Lee Blues, most assuredly the greatest first song any band has ever played together, to the third nights Dark Star broken up into three segments adding up to over 100 minutes of music in Dark Star-> It's Up To You, Days Between -> Dark Star-> My Favorite Things and Terrapin-> DWD-> Dark Star-> Friend Of The Devil, the magic is gushing from the stage in torrents.
, comment by nichobert
nichobert All that said, I'm not going to get my hopes up too high. Obviously 1999 had other issues going on, but IMO there's more to outright adore in those P&F shows than the combined subsequent summer Phish tour. And they really only hit those same heights a few times, like Simple-> My Left Toe and Chalkdust-> Roggae.

Maybe this time it will be different. I like Phish more now than I did 15 years ago, but I wouldn't be shocked if they pulled back up to a Summer 2012 level of on stage communication and execution.
, comment by MtnJam
MtnJam Jeff seems to be getting very little attention, but was on point all weekend. I guess he is least known artist of the band so I understand, but take a listen to his contributions and I think you'll be impressed with what he has to offer.
, comment by sirhotpants
sirhotpants Excellent, accurate recap. I nodded in agreement many times while reading it. Thanks!
, comment by gratefulterp
gratefulterp Thank you, PZ, enjoyed your recap. For this guy, expectations exceeded. The city exceeded my expectations. Well chronicled at this point the wide berth we were granted. What it was, to me, was establishing a large and safe place for us to do our thing. Thank you to the city of Chicago. The heads exceeded my expectations. You didn't have to be on social media much to pick up on negativity leading up to FTW. None of it was evident, to me, once I entered the city. What that place felt like before the band took the stage on Friday...like slipping on an old comfy shoe?...made me think that this was going to be great regardless of what the band did. WE were there and WE were pumped! Thank you all, I love you more than words can tell! The band exceeded my expectations and I expected them to be good. It was more than a few gray beards expressing things like "wow, was I wrong about Trey" during Friday setbreak. I'll overgeneralize and say the band exceeded all expectations. Thank you boys, see you in your various incarnations on the road.
, comment by raidcehlalred
raidcehlalred I couldn't agree more. It looked like at least a couple of time Phil and Bobby gave Trey the "slow down" sign. Not to take away at all from how amazing he was at these shows, or how amazing he is with Phish, but a bit more patience would, I think, be a very good thing.

I don't know, man. At least during the Scarlet - Fire.... It wasn't just Let Trey Sing; it was: Let Trey Ring!

I say 'more notes.'

I hear so much of the same in so much of the recent "II" jamming.

I get the patience bit, but I'm ready for some more Trey-centric playing, rife with that warm sound and action.
, comment by LarryTheDuck
LarryTheDuck Thank you @pzerbo for such a great, thoughtful and objective review.

Since I was 19 years old I've faithfully followed the Dead since my first day of their jaw dropping jamming at the Unitarian Universal Church on February 6, 1966 in what used to be called Sepulveda, California and over the five decades leading to all five shows of Fare Thee Well to the very last refrain of Attics of my life. But enough of that.

I stopped here to praise Trey. Magic was made due to him and the boys. Trey truly transcended any comparisons, including that of Jerry. Trey IS Trey and Garcia IS Garcia.

And thanks to all in you Phish fans for sharing this wonderful man.

~LtD~

Image
, comment by FACTSAREUSELESS
FACTSAREUSELESS @raidcehlalred said:
I couldn't agree more. It looked like at least a couple of time Phil and Bobby gave Trey the "slow down" sign. Not to take away at all from how amazing he was at these shows, or how amazing he is with Phish, but a bit more patience would, I think, be a very good thing.

I don't know, man. At least during the Scarlet - Fire.... It wasn't just Let Trey Sing; it was: Let Trey Ring!

I say 'more notes.'

I hear so much of the same in so much of the recent "II" jamming.

I get the patience bit, but I'm ready for some more Trey-centric playing, rife with that warm sound and action.
Not sure if you're advocating that Trey has more patience.....or less.

The band was playing a lot of upbeat numbers very slowly. This was not a benefit to the music. It was sign that the band was thinking and needed time to process. They couldn't play at the pace they needed to because....they couldn't. So Trey had to slow down for them, not because he was impatient.

Hornsby cuts off the signature riff of Fire by jumping on the lyrics, but Trey covered his tracks nicely. I felt Trey held back during this run and showed great respect/restraint. If he had let loose, only Phil could have stayed with him.
, comment by raidcehlalred
raidcehlalred typing w/ broken hand, so not as cogent as i'd like: sorry.

i totally agree w/ you: trey had to slow; he's beyond patient. this has been established. if phish moves in a different direction, i'm advocating for him to lead.... w/out so much thinking.
, comment by SoularT
SoularT Great write-up. You're right, Trey really stepped up and filled Jerry's hole.
, comment by LarryTheDuck
LarryTheDuck .
Hello again...

From my previous comment...

I stopped here to praise Trey. Magic was made due to him and the boys. Trey truly transcended any comparisons, including that of Jerry. Trey IS Trey and Garcia IS Garcia. And thanks to all of you Phish fans for sharing this wonderful man.

I think this photo says it better...

Image

See you all out on the road...

~LtD~
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